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View Full Version : Queston About "Passing Teams"


remix 6
10-07-2007, 09:00 AM
When people say "this WR came from Texas Tech or Hawaii where his #s are inflated due to the system.." i have some trouble understanding. If the team is a passign team and you put aside the #s a bit, cant you jsut watch the WR play and say "hes got what it takes regardless where he came from?"

you see the WR get the opportunity more to run routes, catch the ball, read defenses and i think it should benefit the WR in many ways if u dont look at #s and just watch film or something

same with QB..you see a lot more throws, he gains a lot of experience throwing and hes forced to make reads more often than an average system.

i think the systems do matter in some ways but if u look beyond the college name and system and just scout the player, you can see that they might be as good as others.

draftguru151
10-07-2007, 11:10 AM
Um, partly. As far as numbers, if a guy plays at Hawaii or TT trying to argue that he is a good player or better than someone else and using his stats to do so doesn't make sense. They're pretty much irrelevant. As far as watching them and judging them, it's hard to tell what is actually them and what is the system. QBs may look like they are accurate or like they're smart but in reality it may just be a one read type of thing and throwing to a wide open guy. Receivers may look like they're getting open but it's really the system. So some things you can tell like arm strength or hands but other things are harder to judge.

SuperKevin
10-07-2007, 01:28 PM
Players in these offenses need to have stats thrown out the window when you are trying to measure their potential. When I look at Michael Crabtree, the numbers are awesome but, I am really looking at what he doesbefore and after he makes the catch. He has size, speed, hands, great body control and sideline awareness. Even if his numbers were cut in half, these things would still stand out and make him a top prospect

Staubach12
10-07-2007, 01:43 PM
Especially with spread passing systems, the system does a very good job of making reads easier for QB, giving WRs better matchups, and helping WRs find holes. This makes it hard to evaluate QBs and WRs, but it can be done. You're not shooting in the dark here. However, you need to evaluate closely.

jared
10-07-2007, 01:54 PM
You can't totally throw out stats though. You can look at what Crabtree is doing within the system as a FRESHMAN and compare him to past TT receivers. His production is off the charts, even by TT standards, which would lead me to believe he is someone to take seriously.

Sniper
10-07-2007, 02:14 PM
You can't totally throw out stats though. You can look at what Crabtree is doing within the system as a FRESHMAN and compare him to past TT receivers. His production is off the charts, even by TT standards, which would lead me to believe he is someone to take seriously.

RS Frosh though, so essentially a sophomore.

etk
10-08-2007, 10:10 AM
Players in these offenses need to have stats thrown out the window when you are trying to measure their potential. When I look at Michael Crabtree, the numbers are awesome but, I am really looking at what he doesbefore and after he makes the catch. He has size, speed, hands, great body control and sideline awareness. Even if his numbers were cut in half, these things would still stand out and make him a top prospect

It's not fair to insert Crabtree in this discussion. I think this thread is for the Joel Filani types.

etk
10-08-2007, 10:12 AM
RS Frosh though, so essentially a sophomore.

A rFr has the same eligibility of a true frosh. It might not be as impressive at the present moment but it's equally as scary for the future.

619
10-08-2007, 10:15 AM
warren moon played in a run 'n shoot offense for most of his career and hes a hall of famer

Race for the Heisman
10-08-2007, 10:28 AM
A rFr has the same eligibility of a true frosh. It might not be as impressive at the present moment but it's equally as scary for the future.

Not really. True froshies could have a medical redshirt later, and a redshirt soph could enter the draft.

Turtlepower
10-08-2007, 10:30 AM
Not really. True froshies could have a medical redshirt later, and a redshirt soph could enter the draft.

For example... Sidney Rice was a redshirt soph when he declared for the draft. =D

etk
10-09-2007, 09:53 PM
Not really. True froshies could have a medical redshirt later, and a redshirt soph could enter the draft.

The draft thing was irrelevant to what I meant, but good point on the medical redshirt. I will point out that you can apply for a 6th year of eligibility even if you were redshirted already, though.

Moses
10-09-2007, 10:00 PM
warren moon played in a run 'n shoot offense for most of his career and hes a hall of famer

Things change in the NFL. It is a lot harder to operate out of a spread offence in the NFL. The game is just so much faster and if you don't keep some TEs or RBs in to block, you'll have no time to pass.

Iamcanadian
10-10-2007, 04:03 AM
Pro scouts don't look at the system a player plays in anywhere near the top of his list as a priority. College football isn't close to pro football. The adjustment to the pro game is immense no matter what position or what college you play for.

For QB's, the 1st priority is always arm strength. Does a QB have a pro arm and no system can change that. If you play for Ohio St. or LSU you are still a system QB and hardly asked to play like a pro QB. This system crap is way overblown. Most extreme system QB's like Hawaii and Texas Tech use it to hide the weakness of their QB's arms but sometimes they actually get a strong armed QB like Brennan and that alone makes him a top prospect.
Yes, he will have to make adjustments just like any other player has to make adjustments when he reaches the pros. It is a completely different game whether you are a QB, an OT, a WR or a defensive player. They all have to make changes.

WR is no different. Texas Tech and the Hawaii's simply don't get great athletes to play at WR. If they did, they would get drafted. It didn't hurt Calvin Johnson that he had to play with a QB named Ball who couldn't hit the side of a barn door, pro scouts could still judge him because he was big and fast, had good hands etc. etc. etc. You put Calvin Johnson in Texas Tech's offense and he gets drafted just as high. Talent and measurables aren't lost no matter what system you play in.

yourfavestoner
10-13-2007, 12:12 AM
Pro scouts don't look at the system a player plays in anywhere near the top of his list as a priority. College football isn't close to pro football. The adjustment to the pro game is immense no matter what position or what college you play for.

For QB's, the 1st priority is always arm strength. Does a QB have a pro arm and no system can change that. If you play for Ohio St. or LSU you are still a system QB and hardly asked to play like a pro QB. This system crap is way overblown. Most extreme system QB's like Hawaii and Texas Tech use it to hide the weakness of their QB's arms but sometimes they actually get a strong armed QB like Brennan and that alone makes him a top prospect.
Yes, he will have to make adjustments just like any other player has to make adjustments when he reaches the pros. It is a completely different game whether you are a QB, an OT, a WR or a defensive player. They all have to make changes.

WR is no different. Texas Tech and the Hawaii's simply don't get great athletes to play at WR. If they did, they would get drafted. It didn't hurt Calvin Johnson that he had to play with a QB named Ball who couldn't hit the side of a barn door, pro scouts could still judge him because he was big and fast, had good hands etc. etc. etc. You put Calvin Johnson in Texas Tech's offense and he gets drafted just as high. Talent and measurables aren't lost no matter what system you play in.

Exactly. If you are a great athlete in a system offense, you will get noticed no matter what.