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View Full Version : NFL Vs NBA Draft Process


kwilk103
06-27-2008, 09:21 PM
watchin the nba draft last night got me thinking how the 2 leagues handle the draft process

nfl----declare, then go to combine, workouts, etc; workouts come after the deadline to pull your name out of the draft


nba---declare, then go the the nba combine, workouts, etc; deadline to pull your name out comes after the combine and most individual workouts

obviously in the nba you get a better feel of where a players gonna go b/c the workouts come before the deadline to come back to school; if you get injured, have bad workouts, etc, you can go back to school; imo, better for underclassmen

in the nfl, you have to declare then workout; if you get injured (like jack i; not gonna attempt to spell his name) your screwed; bad workouts same thing; also you dont get as good as a feel of where your gonna go b/c you have yet to workout; could get some real bad advice

what would be the positives negatives if the nfl were to go the nba route?

positives: players benefit the most; find out if they should go back to school or stay in the draft; less chance for bad advice, as you would have a better understanding of where your gonna get drafted

negatives: draft wise, the talent pool would be diluted; some underclassmen that had bad workouts and would be 2nd day picks would likely head back to school; not as many underclassmen would be in the draft, meaning less draft eligiable players, thus thinning out the talent level; obviously the elite and
1st day picks would stay in the draft; maybe only 5 rounds due to less players?

what are your thoughts on the 2 leagues and their draft? just something i thought of last night and thought it would make a nice discussion to pass some time(mainly b/c alexander shot up the boards from late 1st to top 10 b/c of workouts, and if it was like the nfl, he doesnt test the waters)

forgot to say i prefer the nba's system; i really like how it benefits the player more than the league

BeerBaron
06-27-2008, 10:42 PM
well i think the biggest part of what the nba does better is the pay scale...but thats a whole nother topic for a whole nother discussion.....

it would be nice if players could pull their names out of the draft though. I honestly believe it wouldn't hurt a thing for a player who still has eligibility but goes undrafted to be allowed to go back to school.

the NFL loves the NCAA because it's basically a free minor league system. They get to scrape off the cream that rises to the top every year and make millions for it. Then the next year, they get to do it again......i think thats why the NFL has rules in place like they do to keep the NCAA happy and contented such as the 3 year rule.

certain positions like QB that require a development of the mental game and positions like on the lines that require a few years of college to develop physically probably wouldn't be affected but for a RB who is maybe a true freshman and has a monster year.....a guy like that at his position could probably go straight to the NFL and it would take carries off him that he could use to make money with.

so i can see why the NFL does what it does to keep the NCAA happy to a degree but swiping a few ideas from what the NBA does right wouldn't hurt either

kwilk103
06-27-2008, 11:20 PM
yea, i like the 3 yr rule

but i was mainly talking about how they conduct workouts and the entering/taking name out of the draft

i'm interested to hear scott's take on it (does he post in the offseason?; i dont really come on this board til season starts)

sprawwl
07-02-2008, 12:37 PM
watchin the nba draft last night got me thinking how the 2 leagues handle the draft process

negatives: draft wise, the talent pool would be diluted; some underclassmen that had bad workouts and would be 2nd day picks would likely head back to school; not as many underclassmen would be in the draft, meaning less draft eligiable players, thus thinning out the talent level; obviously the elite and
1st day picks would stay in the draft; maybe only 5 rounds due to less players?

I don't think that the talent pool would be diluted - after the first couple of years, you'd have the same number of people coming out of school. There's a shelf life for how long people can stay in school before they have to go pro.

What you would see would, I think, be more borderline prospects testing the draft waters, and an eventual emphasis even more on workouts rather than performance. You'd get a lot more Thomas Howards rather than Paul Poslusznys (sp?)

The ability to test the draft would mean that there would be more expenses for teams and the league in terms of scouting and visiting and testing. That and the emphasis on measurables would be the only real drawbacks I could think of.

Duster
07-02-2008, 01:52 PM
With the NFL there is a danger of having too many players working out/testing the waters. It's not so bad in the NBA because there's likely less than 100 guys to look at but in the NFL it would be well over 1000.

wogitalia
07-04-2008, 07:22 AM
With the NFL there is a danger of having too many players working out/testing the waters. It's not so bad in the NBA because there's likely less than 100 guys to look at but in the NFL it would be well over 1000.

Such different sports and drafts though. NBA has 60 guys that get selected and another maybe 60 that get shots in summer camps. There are very few guys who have a shot if they are undrafted, not to mention, there are no systems and the like where certain guys will appeal to some teams and not the others.

In the NFL you have guys who are 3-4 only prospects and vice-versa, zbs, vertical receivers, so many mroe guys have a chance at making a roster, not to mention how many undrafted FAs there are each year, so you have and need a much bigger draft class(not to mention the 7 round draft).

As for the systems themselves, the NBA system leads to less steals, you don't get guys who because of a poor 40 time slide to the later rounds because they go back to school and work on it for next year, of course the major affect that the NBA system has is to seriously devalue seniors, those guys have no chance if they mess up and can thus free fall and more importantly their college achievements get forgotten. It is something I don't like.

You certainly see it in the NFL as well, but not to the same extent, guys like Leinart and Quinn have been recent victims, but it isn't anywhere near as widespread. The NFL system leads to more steals, which is nice, I also think it rewards players more for their college achievements, guys like Jack Ike would have been done in the NBA with no chance because he couldn't play next year and he most likely wouldn't get picked this year, would make his life very hard, but that has as much to do with there being more rounds as the workout setup.

Personally I think the only advantage the NBA system has is the rookie scaled contracts and that is a seperate issue.