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oldLibid21
07-18-2008, 12:48 PM
There's no denying that Oher's one hell of a physical player. He's got all the tools you need to be successful in this league. Except one thing: he's got learning 'disabilities' like that of a child. Do most of you realize the problems Oher had to go through to master a college playbook? No doubt he will have twice, if not more, problems with an NFL playbook. What do you guys think of this? I personally think this will really slow him down in the NFL. I actually think it will become so big of a problem that it might be the one thing that determines whether or not he makes it to a Pro Bowl and things like that, but that's just my opinion.

Turtlepower
07-18-2008, 12:51 PM
I think that people who have read Blindside drastically overrate Michael Oher's mental capacity. I could assume that many NFL offensive lineman also struggle mentally in the game, but they just haven't been as open about it as Michael Oher is.

Addict
07-18-2008, 12:55 PM
Just curious, but do linemen really need to know the playbook that thourough? All they really need to do is know if it's a run, pass, play action or misdirection play... other than that it's just blocking people...

eaglesalltheway
07-18-2008, 02:18 PM
You've never played offensive line have you Addict? I don't mean that be offensive, but that is something that people who have never played the position, and thus don't understand it, say. There is sooo much an O-linemen needs to know and remember. Granted it isn't nearly that of a Quarterback or Runningback, but it isn't like your out there taking up space and mauling guys who come near you. Have you ever seen in games linemen will point at certain defenders (usually the C does most of the pointing) to let people know who the man they must block is. It is also anticipation and understanding of the runninggame. You also have to know where the ball is going on a run play so you can determine how you will attempt your block. This is very basic but a good example. Say you are a RG, and a 22 Dive is called. You have to know that that means the RB will be trying to run one your left hand side, and thus, you need to position yourself on the defender you are up against in order to create as clear of a path as possible. But if a 24 Gut is called, you must also know that the run is going to your right hand side and you need to position your body between the defender and the runner to prevent your man form making the play. A linemen just doensn't listen to the play and go "Oh its a run, I've got to plow this guy over" and they don't go "Ahh a pass, I've got to shuffel my feet and keep him from getting to the QB." There are also times where linemen willdo what is called a chop block. And attempt to take the feet right out from unfer their opposing D-linemen. O-linemen will do this if they are being outmatched in some form or another. In pass blocking, there are assingments that can switch depending on what the defense brings. Sometimes a C or G will have to quick slide out to prevent a LB or blitzing secondary member form reaching the QB from the outside, while still being aware that there may be a guy trying to bait him in the middle of the field into thinking that he is going into coverage, only to blitz once that linemen has bit on the outside rush. Bottom line is you need to have at least some football knowledge to be successful in the NFL, no matter how athleticly gifted you are.

oldLibid21
07-18-2008, 03:04 PM
You've never played offensive line have you Addict? I don't mean that be offensive, but that is something that people who have never played the position, and thus don't understand it, say. There is sooo much an O-linemen needs to know and remember. Granted it isn't nearly that of a Quarterback or Runningback, but it isn't like your out there taking up space and mauling guys who come near you. Have you ever seen in games linemen will point at certain defenders (usually the C does most of the pointing) to let people know who the man they must block is. It is also anticipation and understanding of the runninggame. You also have to know where the ball is going on a run play so you can determine how you will attempt your block. This is very basic but a good example. Say you are a RG, and a 22 Dive is called. You have to know that that means the RB will be trying to run one your left hand side, and thus, you need to position yourself on the defender you are up against in order to create as clear of a path as possible. But if a 24 Gut is called, you must also know that the run is going to your right hand side and you need to position your body between the defender and the runner to prevent your man form making the play. A linemen just doensn't listen to the play and go "Oh its a run, I've got to plow this guy over" and they don't go "Ahh a pass, I've got to shuffel my feet and keep him from getting to the QB." There are also times where linemen willdo what is called a chop block. And attempt to take the feet right out from unfer their opposing D-linemen. O-linemen will do this if they are being outmatched in some form or another. In pass blocking, there are assingments that can switch depending on what the defense brings. Sometimes a C or G will have to quick slide out to prevent a LB or blitzing secondary member form reaching the QB from the outside, while still being aware that there may be a guy trying to bait him in the middle of the field into thinking that he is going into coverage, only to blitz once that linemen has bit on the outside rush. Bottom line is you need to have at least some football knowledge to be successful in the NFL, no matter how athleticly gifted you are.

Yep. I have a friend who plays offensive guard/tackle for my high school team. Yes, my high school team, and he even complains sometimes that they ask too for too much when remembering the plays. Their playbook is no joke either. It's easily over twenty pages.

Addict
07-18-2008, 03:12 PM
You've never played offensive line have you Addict? I don't mean that be offensive, but that is something that people who have never played the position, and thus don't understand it, say.

never played O-line, or football for that matter (European)

There is sooo much an O-linemen needs to know and remember. Granted it isn't nearly that of a Quarterback or Runningback, but it isn't like your out there taking up space and mauling guys who come near you.

that was exactly my point. I didn't say they just need to know 'pass' from 'run', but the knowledge needed to play isn't as large as a 'skill' position.


Have you ever seen in games linemen will point at certain defenders (usually the C does most of the pointing) to let people know who the man they must block is. It is also anticipation and understanding of the runninggame. You also have to know where the ball is going on a run play so you can determine how you will attempt your block.

Firstly, Oher plays tackle, so he won't need to be pointing, but moving on, anticipation is more a general feel for the game, which I understand is crucial. Besides that, I never said they don't need to know what the playbook is, just that they don't need to know it as well as non-line players.

This is very basic but a good example. Say you are a RG, and a 22 Dive is called. You have to know that that means the RB will be trying to run one your left hand side, and thus, you need to position yourself on the defender you are up against in order to create as clear of a path as possible. But if a 24 Gut is called, you must also know that the run is going to your right hand side and you need to position your body between the defender and the runner to prevent your man form making the play.

It really isn't fair to cut up your post this way, since it cuts up your point. So I won't repeat my point again.

Anyway, this I understand.

A linemen just doensn't listen to the play and go "Oh its a run, I've got to plow this guy over" and they don't go "Ahh a pass, I've got to shuffel my feet and keep him from getting to the QB."

see above.


There are also times where linemen willdo what is called a chop block. And attempt to take the feet right out from unfer their opposing D-linemen. O-linemen will do this if they are being outmatched in some form or another.

well that seems pretty easy to remember: when beat -> chop block. I don't really see how that's relevant to the point.


In pass blocking, there are assingments that can switch depending on what the defense brings. Sometimes a C or G will have to quick slide out to prevent a LB or blitzing secondary member form reaching the QB from the outside, while still being aware that there may be a guy trying to bait him in the middle of the field into thinking that he is going into coverage, only to blitz once that linemen has bit on the outside rush.

what you're discussing now is field awareness, not playbook knowledge. Anyhow, I didn't mean to say playing OL is for morons or anything like that.


Bottom line is you need to have at least some football knowledge to be successful in the NFL, no matter how athleticly gifted you are.

Obviously.

I think you misinterpreted my point. All I was saying was that lineman don't need to know the playbook AS THOROUGH as guys who play RB, QB or WR. Their basic task is always: blocking. Picking up blitzes and stuff like that has more to do with awareness and vision, not playbook knowledge.

IndyColtScout
07-18-2008, 04:00 PM
I was a TE in HS, however I was used a few times as a reserve guard when a few OL went down.

Personally, I think you are completely overrating Oher's mental limitations and how the will affect him on the NFL level.

Granted I did not play at the same level, but seriously when I went into OG I knew what the play was, but I literally got 0 reps with the other players. So basically its like throwing someone into the fire. Guess what? I never allowed a sack on the few drives that I played OG.

Oher is awesome, and frankly I think his bigger problem is dealing with speed rushers and not his learning disabilities.

I understand what you are saying in terms of the bigger playbook, protection schemes, OL audibles, helping w/ double team, knowing when to pull, stuff like that. However, Oher has been doing this for a while. IMO the transitions for a LT is going to be a lot easier to make than that of a QB. If this was a QB, maybe this has merit. I don't think this will be a problem for Oher.

PossumBoy9
07-18-2008, 04:08 PM
Alex Barron has obvious physical gifts, but the mental part of the game has been his weakness thus far. He's infamous in St. Louis for his false starts.

Byrd430
07-18-2008, 06:24 PM
It's a big leap between college and pro and there are very few players who have the ability to step right into an NFL uniform and be a star.

Will his 'mental disability' slow him down? Sure it is. So will the speed of the game. So will the opposing DEs.

I think the worst this means for Oher is just that it will take some time to really develop himself. But as I said, it's not like too many teams honestly believe that a drafted player is going to step in and dominate.

mqtirishfan
07-18-2008, 06:35 PM
I'd want no part in trying to figure out how to play LT in the NFL. It takes a very intelligent player to play LT at a higher level.

IndyColtScout
07-18-2008, 06:39 PM
I'd want no part in trying to figure out how to play LT in the NFL. It takes a very intelligent player to play LT at a higher level.

I'm pretty sure that most Centers are the leaders of their units as well. So I doubt Oher is going to be calling out line changes and such. I believe most teams view the Center position as the most intelligent of the OLmen. I really don't think this will cause him problems. Yeah it took him a little while to develop but time is what is usually takes to get better.

oldLibid21
07-18-2008, 07:40 PM
It's a big leap between college and pro and there are very few players who have the ability to step right into an NFL uniform and be a star.

Will his 'mental disability' slow him down? Sure it is. So will the speed of the game. So will the opposing DEs.

I think the worst this means for Oher is just that it will take some time to really develop himself. But as I said, it's not like too many teams honestly believe that a drafted player is going to step in and dominate.

Woah, we're not talking about a rookie quarterback stepping into the spotlight here. For a second there, I thought you were trying to explain to me how hard it is for a rookie offensive linemen to step in as a starter in the NFL...

There have been so many successful rookie offensive linemen that have just stepped into the starting role in place of, say, an injured player and did very well. It's a lot harder for a position like quarterback to find a diamond rookie in the rough. But in terms of offensive linemen, you always hear of unknown rookies just step in and start dominating other teams.

I'm saying sure, teams draft rookies realizing they need to be developed, but the offensive line is undoubtedly one of the easier positions to get in comparison to other positions on the field (such as QB, RB, WR, etc.)

However, when a team drafts someone like Oher, he will undoubtedly be among the Top 5 drafted in the draft. When an offensive linemen is drafted that high, they don't think, "Hmm, this kid needs a year or two to develop." When you're drafted that high as an offensive lineman, you're expected to start day one and get in the mix as soon as possible.

yourfavestoner
07-18-2008, 10:55 PM
You guys, offensive linemen (particularly centers) are often the second smartest guys on the field behind quarterbacks. They have to remember MUCH more that running backs or other skill positions. Why do you think it's so easy for running backs to make the transition from college or the NFL?

Offensive linemen have to remember complicated blocking schemes. Also realize that every play is blocked differently, and it depends on the front the defense is in.

Caddy
07-19-2008, 12:19 AM
Michael Oher is going to be an extremely interesting case as we get closer and closer to the draft due to his prominence in the book Blind Side. The ordinary person who knows little about the draft will know the name Michael Oher and will also know about his life and the things he has had to do to get to where he is today.

He is physically gifted and everybody is aware of that. He has won the critical acclaim of scouts and coaches all over the country. The pressure on him is going to be immense once he is drafted into the NFL and I think this pressure alone will cause just as much trouble as any learning disability.

mqtirishfan
07-19-2008, 12:19 AM
Woah, we're not talking about a rookie quarterback stepping into the spotlight here. For a second there, I thought you were trying to explain to me how hard it is for a rookie offensive linemen to step in as a starter in the NFL...


It sounds like you have absolutely no idea how the game of football is played. As an offensive lineman, you need to be able to recognize blitz schemes and how the front 7 will react at a moment's notice, or you will be a weak link on the play. An OT doesn't account for a guy on a stunt? Sack. An OT misses a LB reading a play on a sweep? Loss of yards. This is just at a basic high school level. Try having guys like Mario Williams and Jared Allen trying to make plays, with the best defensive minds in the world sending them every-which-way. You have to know and recognize all of the things that a defense can do on any given play.

Also note that I am completely ignoring that this recognition must be used differently on almost any play.

oldLibid21
07-19-2008, 12:47 AM
It sounds like you have absolutely no idea how the game of football is played. As an offensive lineman, you need to be able to recognize blitz schemes and how the front 7 will react at a moment's notice, or you will be a weak link on the play. An OT doesn't account for a guy on a stunt? Sack. An OT misses a LB reading a play on a sweep? Loss of yards. This is just at a basic high school level. Try having guys like Mario Williams and Jared Allen trying to make plays, with the best defensive minds in the world sending them every-which-way. You have to know and recognize all of the things that a defense can do on any given play.

Also note that I am completely ignoring that this recognition must be used differently on almost any play.

The transition that an offensive tackle has to make in the NFL from the college level is much easier than the transition than that of a quarterback no matter how you say it.

Caddy
07-19-2008, 01:11 AM
The transition that an offensive tackle has to make in the NFL from the college level is much easier than the transition than that of a quarterback no matter how you say it.

You do realise that just because it is easier translate as an OT than a QB doesn't mean that it is an easy transition.

eaglesfan_45
07-19-2008, 01:23 AM
The transition that an offensive tackle has to make in the NFL from the college level is much easier than the transition than that of a quarterback no matter how you say it.


Really, than what happened to Robert Gallery? He was so dominant as College OT but what has he amounted to as a Pro OT? Not Much.

You significantly underestimate the transition from college OT to pro OT. You have to adjust to a new game speed, a bigger playbook, and more complex blitzes. That, and your facing top-notch competition week in and week out.

Scott Wright
07-20-2008, 04:30 AM
As someone mentioned Oher is going to be a very interesting prospect in the '09 Draft and anybody who has read the book will have reservations. Top prospects are obviously scrutinized but teams will absolutely take an even closer look at Oher throughout the draft process.

Personally, based on film I am a fan of his and I think Oher has a chance to be a Top 3-5 draft pick but there are many who feel he is vastly overrated, due at least in part to some of the concerns mentioned in this thread. When I re-launch the site next month Oher will be my #1 rated senior offensive tackle and one of my Top 3 prospects overall but I sure wouldn't bet the house on him being there come April of '09. That's not to say he won't be, but there are factors out there that could push him down and some other talented players like Eugene Monroe who could give him a run for his money.

eaglesfan_45
07-20-2008, 04:58 AM
what exactly are Micheal Oher's mental disabilities?

wicket
07-20-2008, 12:01 PM
Really, than what happened to Robert Gallery? He was so dominant as College OT but what has he amounted to as a Pro OT? Not Much.

You significantly underestimate the transition from college OT to pro OT. You have to adjust to a new game speed, a bigger playbook, and more complex blitzes. That, and your facing top-notch competition week in and week out.
He is not saying that it is the easiest transition to make and obviously there are people gonna fail, otherwise the top pick every year would be a OT or one of the other surefire situations. However a higher percentage of the top prospect offensive linemen seem to succeed, which translates into a situation where the pro-quality of an offensive lineman is easier to scout than that of some other positions and the transition is easier. Although it must be said that there are few rookie-star-linemen on either side of the ball.

etk
07-20-2008, 12:52 PM
Offensive linemen have one of the toughest positions in the game from a mental standpoint. They have to be down in a 3-point stance with limited vision, and knowing the playcall is only 1/10 of the way to knowing your assignment. Defenses throw different looks at you and the lineman has to know who's blitzing if they're pass blocking and they have to decide who they're blocking in the run game depending on the alignment of the front 7/8. It's not easy to determine whether you have to down block the end, reach for the linebacker, or chip the nose guard and go after the middle backer. On top of that, the linemen have to know the strength and athletic ability of their opponent as well as their favorite pass rush combinations, similar to batters scouting pitchers. The physical nature of the position is also challenging mentally, as you have to grind it out in the trenches for 60 minutes and you have to be tenacious every play. Not everyone is born wanting to kill people every chance they get. It's especially tough because linemen get very little appreciation or admiration from fans and the media and it can become depressing (Nick Kaczur?).

Ask Tony Mandarich how important it is to be stable mentally as an offensive lineman in the game of football. There's only one position that is more prone to mental mistakes, and that is quarterback (safety is up there as well).

Paranoidmoonduck
07-20-2008, 02:52 PM
Personally, I do like Eugene Monroe from Virginia more. But Oher's maneuverability and power shouldn't be underestimated.

oldLibid21
07-20-2008, 03:08 PM
Some of you guys misunderstood what I meant. I realize that there is a big jump from the college to the NFL level. (That's what this thread is based around- is Oher ready for that or is he even capable of making the jump?) I was talking to some of you guys before that was making it sound like the transition of an offensive tackle was SO big that it would have to make them sit the bench and learn the game behind a veteran offensive tackle for a couple years (like a rookie quarterback would). I was just simply pointing out that there is a huge difference between the transition of a rookie QB than that of a rookie OT.

And I'm just curious to why this topic was closed before. Anyone know why?

marks01234
07-25-2008, 08:04 AM
Some of you guys misunderstood what I meant. I realize that there is a big jump from the college to the NFL level. (That's what this thread is based around- is Oher ready for that or is he even capable of making the jump?) I was talking to some of you guys before that was making it sound like the transition of an offensive tackle was SO big that it would have to make them sit the bench and learn the game behind a veteran offensive tackle for a couple years (like a rookie quarterback would). I was just simply pointing out that there is a huge difference between the transition of a rookie QB than that of a rookie OT.

And I'm just curious to why this topic was closed before. Anyone know why?

You do realize that a lot of QBs come in and start and have success right away. Peyton Manning, Ben Roethlisberger, Daunte Culpepper, Kurt Warner, Randall Cunningham and Dan Marino all come to mind. Heck, even Mike Vick (who one could argue never got a good grasp of the mental aspect of the game) had a good rookie season.

You don't see rookie offensive tackles sitting the bench very often, largely because their is five offensive line positions. It's pretty common for an NFL team to draft a rookie QB with a solid guy ahead of him. It is also pretty common for an NFL team to draft a rookie tackle with a solid guy ahead of him. The difference for lineman is that one of the two players can be easily moved to another lineman position (usually right tackle but also guard). It is a lot easier to find a way to get a lineman into your lineup than it is a QB.

For those that have played football out here - let me me finish with this comment that I am sure you will agree with - There is a huge difference between thinking before the play snaps than thinking while the play is going on. And there is a huge difference in thinking while the play is going on and thinking while the play is going on after you've been hit.

Scott Wright
07-31-2008, 10:11 AM
I am actually going to be interviewing Michael this morning and I am definitely going to ask about about any potential learning disabilities.

That interview will be posted when the site re-launches, which is tentatively scheduled for Monday, August 11.

Fogcity_faithful
07-31-2008, 10:46 AM
I think most of this is being blown out of proportion. If he has a learning disability and it is documented he has probably learned ways to deal with it. He may take longer to learn a playbook, but he will be able to play at the level required. Interested to read that interview

ChezPower4
07-31-2008, 12:49 PM
It seems like he's doing just fine in college with learning the play book. The team that drafts him will no doubt find a way to help him grasp the offense quicker than maybe he would on his own. It also would seem likely given his situation that NFL teams would be willing to be patient with Oher.

ChezPower4
07-31-2008, 12:49 PM
I am actually going to be interviewing Michael this morning and I am definitely going to ask about about any potential learning disabilities.

That interview will be posted when the site re-launches, which is tentatively scheduled for Monday, August 11.

Can't wait for the re-launch

eaglesalltheway
07-31-2008, 02:09 PM
I am actually going to be interviewing Michael this morning and I am definitely going to ask about about any potential learning disabilities.

That interview will be posted when the site re-launches, which is tentatively scheduled for Monday, August 11.

Can't wait Scott, both for the relaunch and the interview. I really envy you sometimes. I woudl love to be in a posisiton like you are.

Mr. Stiller
08-01-2008, 12:51 AM
It sounds like you have absolutely no idea how the game of football is played. As an offensive lineman, you need to be able to recognize blitz schemes and how the front 7 will react at a moment's notice, or you will be a weak link on the play. An OT doesn't account for a guy on a stunt? Sack. An OT misses a LB reading a play on a sweep? Loss of yards. This is just at a basic high school level. Try having guys like Mario Williams and Jared Allen trying to make plays, with the best defensive minds in the world sending them every-which-way. You have to know and recognize all of the things that a defense can do on any given play.

Also note that I am completely ignoring that this recognition must be used differently on almost any play.

I agree here... but I must add...

Some people are making it seem like Oher has never played LT and will get drafted merely on measureables. Having to learn how to play LT from scratch.

This is a guy who has week in, week out, year in, year out for the past 2 years (Not including this coming year) been one of the best LT's in the college game.

So While there is a learning curve (Possibly new Technique, new scheme, different language, etc.) it's not like he doesn't have some experience to make the curve easier as opposed.. Myself who'd never played OL in my life jumping in there.

I think Oher staying his senior season in college speaks VOLUMES about how he's trying to take that next step in becoming not only one of the best, but THE best and most elite LT to come out in a couple of years.

I think his mental limitations are overrated in the sense that a lot of football players, even great ones, seem like half a tard.

I know someone on here for the longest time had Emmitt Smith comments in his profile. Listening to Emmitt and Thannon Tharpe make me want to have a brain aneurysm, but they also were some of the best players at their position in their era.

Now, Oher may not be suited to pull a Joe Thomas and anchor his OL his first year.. In fact many college players are not.

So if it takes him a year to get up to NFL Speed and such, there are far worse things that could happen.

If he doesn't click, I'll be extremely disappointed.. but if he does, he should be one of the best in the pro game.

Paranoidmoonduck
08-01-2008, 04:19 PM
Keep in mind that Michael Oher couldn't read at 14 years old and by the time he was a senior in High School he was making the Honor Roll and Dean's List. From what I've seen he's actually decently eloquent. I don't have many concerns about the kid's intelligence.

Byrd430
08-01-2008, 07:25 PM
Keep in mind that Michael Oher couldn't read at 14 years old and by the time he was a senior in High School he was making the Honor Roll and Dean's List. From what I've seen he's actually decently eloquent. I don't have many concerns about the kid's intelligence.

Where do you find this info? I live in MS and I still didn't know this!

oldLibid21
08-01-2008, 09:56 PM
Can't wait to see how that goes, Scott.

TACKLE
08-01-2008, 11:18 PM
Where do you find this info? I live in MS and I still didn't know this!

It's called The Blind Side by Michael Lewis. Great book that focuses on Michael Oher's life.

WCH
08-04-2008, 10:59 AM
Multiple studies have been done over the past 30 years or so, and all of them have shown that OT's are among the most intelligent people in all of professional sports. The average wonderlic score is 26. The only non-OL who average higher than a 20 are TEs and QBs.

Here's one analysis:
http://benfry.com/writing/archives/147

Here's an image showing the average wonderlic scores for each position:
http://benfry.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/positions2.png

To put these numbers into perspective, here are the average scores for a few other professions:

Chemist: 31
Programmer: 29
Newswriter: 26
Sales: 24
Bank teller: 22
Clerical Worker: 21
Security Guard: 17
Warehouse: 15

So basically, yes, it definately helps to be pretty smart if you want to play OL in the NFL. Maybe you can get away with just pushing guys around on your HS football team, but that won't cut it in the pro ranks.

SenorGato
08-16-2008, 06:13 PM
Oher actually sounds pretty intelligent in Scott's interview. Honestly, I realize Lewis paints all of his main characters very, very favorably, but what I got from The Blind Side wasn't that he was stupid or had any learning disability of any kind at all. He really was just never taught the stuff, and if he was it really didn't matter to him because well...he kind of had to try to survive first everything else later.

I believe Oher has the drive, intelligence, AND talent to legitimately be picked in the top 10. Even if he has a learning disability, it doesn't seem to have held him back at all.

Race for the Heisman
08-16-2008, 08:28 PM
I wouldn't be worried about him at all just given the progress he has shown. To come as far as he has in the amount of time that he has, it shows either enormous potential or fantastic work ethic, so why worry?

Scott Wright
08-17-2008, 04:26 AM
For what it's worth Oher was not real talkative and kind of a boring interview, although that doesn't necessarily indicate anything about intelligence.

Also, he told me unequivocally that he does not have any issues with a learning disability. I even threw a follow up at him about it but nothing.

Here is his exact quote:

Scott Wright: Perhaps one of the biggest concerns when it comes to Michael Oher as a pro prospect is a potential learning disability that could hold you back a bit when it comes to absorbing an NFL offense. Can you talk about that a bit?

Michael Oher: There is no issue. I learn everything fine and rarely miss an assignment. That’s really out the door and I have no trouble learning anything.

http://www.draftcountdown.com/interviews/Michael-Oher/Michael-Oher.php

eaglesfan_45
08-17-2008, 04:26 AM
Senor Gato, he sounded intelligent in Scott's interview? how do you know, his answers were no longer than 1 sentence.

Edit: Scott beat me too it. But I said that as soon as I read the interview.

Micheal Oher seemed like a gloriously entertaining interviewee Scott :rolleyes:

Personally I hate having to interview people who give awnsers like that, and unfortunately for me it happens alot (On my schools newspaper, I'm going to be the sports writer this year), because the other people at my school think they're hilarious when they make things awkward or they think that being interviewed is weird so they try to hurry up so they can finish.

SenorGato
08-17-2008, 09:56 AM
Eh...seems like he just kind of answers the questions and moves on. Bad guy to interview...sure...and I realize I wasn't there to add context to his answers but it seems like he just kind of answers the questions and waits for the next one.

D'you see these guys when you interview them Mr. Wright? What was his body language like?

Scott Wright
08-17-2008, 02:07 PM
Eh...seems like he just kind of answers the questions and moves on. Bad guy to interview...sure...and I realize I wasn't there to add context to his answers but it seems like he just kind of answers the questions and waits for the next one.

D'you see these guys when you interview them Mr. Wright? What was his body language like?

I interviewed Oher over the phone.

He seemed very nice, just quiet and gave short answers.

Basically the exact opposite of a guy like Colt Brennan.

Addict
08-17-2008, 02:11 PM
I interviewed Oher over the phone.

He seemed very nice, just quiet and gave short answers.

Basically the exact opposite of a guy like Colt Brennan.

he really blew you away didn't he?

Scott Wright
08-17-2008, 02:26 PM
he really blew you away didn't he?

Who, Brennan?

Definitely. As I have said many times in the past Colt is one of the most charismatic people I have ever spoken to or been around.

When it comes to the "It" factor he has it in spades.

Addict
08-17-2008, 02:29 PM
Who, Brennan?

Definitely. As I have said many times in the past Colt is one of the most charismatic people I have ever spoken to or been around.

When it comes to the "It" factor he has it in spades.

when he did so well in the week 1 preseason game, I figured you'd be pretty happy.

Yeah I've seen him talk a few times and he really does handle interviews very well, he just makes you love him.

jballa838
08-17-2008, 02:31 PM
and how is that it factor working for him thus far in the pro's?
just wondering :)

Addict
08-17-2008, 03:08 PM
and how is that it factor working for him thus far in the pro's?
just wondering :)

Coaches are human too, though he'll have to play well ultimately, he'll get a few more chances than most because he's so likeable.

jballa838
08-17-2008, 03:35 PM
Coaches are human too, though he'll have to play well ultimately, he'll get a few more chances than most because he's so likeable.
So are teammates, making him the bizzarro Ryan Leaf.

Saints-Tigers
08-23-2008, 09:50 PM
Off the field intelligence and digesting a playbook are very important, but even more so is instincts, and how quick a player reacts on the field, and that really can't be taught, cramming the playbook CAN be taught to an extent, it will take work and a lot of dedication.

I haven't studied much on Oher, how would everyone rate his actual instincts and his ability to react on the fly?

Edit: My favorite example of this is NBA player Brandon Roy, he's known for his basketball IQ, and his ability to read and react to plays, but he also has a learning disability, but busted his ass hard to learn in College, but most of all, he's a natural basketball player.

Mr.Regular
08-26-2008, 11:41 AM
Just finished The Blind Side, really good book, easy read... perfect for draftniks!
Anyway, yeah I clearly have some issues with Oher's mental limitations. He has depended on others his whole life to kind of push him along. Like there has always been a guiding hand making sure he does everything correctly. Doesn't seem very bright or independant... and when he is in the NFL he will be expected to become a staple in the left side right away. That takes major brains, and football IQ.
Can he do it? Yes. Will he? Who knows.
That being said he for sure has the physical aspect down. And his story is very inspirational. He does seem like a great guy, and a guy you'd want to root for, so coming the 09 season I'll definately be rooting for him (except of course if ends up a Bear or Viking).