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CJSchneider
09-11-2009, 05:59 AM
http://schember.net/db1/00080/schember.net/_uimages/9-11image-pictakenforschember.netwebsiteon15October2005.jpg

I for one would enjoy hearing the memories that members of this forum have of 9/11. I will thank everyone in advance for not letting thread become a political discussion of any kind and remain a tribute to those who passed as well as a thank you to those who responded.

Caddy
09-11-2009, 07:09 AM
It feels so long ago now. I was back in my early years at high school and I remember pretty well everything that was going on. For 24-48 hours all 3-4 commercial channels were covered in non-stop footage.

no bare feet
09-11-2009, 08:15 AM
Any chance I can I like to show my appreciation to those who serve this country whether armed forces, civil servants, law enforcement, etc. This day is a day that will forever be in my mind. Thoughts and prayers will always be with those who lost their lives.

killxswitch
09-11-2009, 08:29 AM
I was in my senior year of high school at the time. I remember being a mix of nervous and angry. I remember there being rumors all over the place that there were other planes in the air and that it was only beginning. I remember my English teacher's son was living a few blocks from the WTC and how relieved she was when he called and said he had slept through the attacks and was fine.

And I remember the asshole gas stations using it as an excuse to jack up gas prices. In some areas it spiked to over $5/gallon.

I remember for days afterward there were no planes in the sky, no jet engine trails, no helicopters, nothing.

I appreciate those who left their lives behind to go to NY, from all over the nation, to rescue the victims of the attack. The deaths of those trying to save others are equally heroic and sad.

TitleTown088
09-11-2009, 09:07 AM
I remember my high school teacher wouldn't let us watch it and told us that Al queda didn't do it because they had initially denied it.

RAVENS/WIZARDS/ORIOLES
09-11-2009, 09:16 AM
I remember everyone's parents calling the school and picking up their kids. I was the only dickhead in all my classes the rest of the day...........My parents didn't care :(.

On a serious note **** AL QUEDA!!!!! I give all the respect to anyone who serves with our military. There is a boy in my class that was a marine for 4 years and served 2 tours in Iraq. He got a standing ovation in the class. Firefighters, Cops, and everyone who helped during this tragic time.

JRTPlaya21
09-11-2009, 09:19 AM
I was in 6th grade and I was in my English class. It was the brightest, clearest day possible. Our princpal came on over the loudspeaker I think at almost 11 and said there had been an attack on the World Trade. The majority of us didn't know what that was and our teacher explained it to us. When I got home that day I watched CNN with my mom and could not believe what I was seeing. My history teacher down the hall was very concerned because her son lived nearby. To this day I will never forget all of the details of where I was and what happened.

YAYareaRB
09-11-2009, 09:28 AM
I was in 7th grade getting ready for school and seen it happening on TV. It was unreal for me.. It didn't feel like it was happening. I couldn't help but feel for all people involved for a very long time. I usually feel for people who have passed away but this was by far the worst I have ever experienced. This lady that went to my church was on one of those planes. I would feel absolutely crushed everytime I seen her husband or her kids.

Canadian_kid16
09-11-2009, 09:42 AM
I was in 5th grade, and being Canadian, I didn't have much of an idea of what the World Trade Center was. Our school also didn't have cable television anywhere, so while we tried watching a bit of the coverage on unfocused, unclear television, it was difficult.

We stayed in class the whole day, and I remember a slightly bigger story being how an airport in Newfoundland housed some American planes who were grounded their once the attacks happened.

ironman4579
09-11-2009, 09:55 AM
I was in the military at the time. We were doing EIB practice (military guys will know what that is). One of the guys came down to our platoon area and said that a plane had hit one of the Twin Towers. A bunch of us went into my room and started watching the coverage. I saw the second plane hit the tower as it happened. Then they said that a plane had hit the Pentagon. We just kind of looked at each other and said "We're going." Then everyone started getting their gear ready for deployment. It was one of the most intense feelings/experiences of my life.

BoneKrusher
09-11-2009, 10:12 AM
being a late sleeper, i remember turning on the tv as i woke up and just the shock of the second plane hitting the towers and the sick feeling of, is this really happening?

Jughead10
09-11-2009, 10:21 AM
I was a freshmen in college attending school in the Bronx and quite hungover that morning. One of the locals bars that let in underage kids had Monday night football specials. It was week 1, and the Giants were playing Denver. Remember McCaffrey broke his leg that night.

My mom called that morning and woke me up and told me not to go into Manhattan cause there had been an attack. I watched a lot of it on TV and at one point went to the highest buliding on campus and could see all the smoke from a distance.

The most memorable thing to me was the following week. And the fear that had come over a lot of people. Class was cancelled all week but I remember not being able to get home until Friday because all the bridges/tunnels/trains were closed. Also the jet fighters and military choppers flying overhead for the next week or so was very memorable. We had a vigil on campus which was interrupted a bit by a loud chopper flying over head.

Also remember getting a ton of AIM messages that day from friends wondering if I was ok. Apparently people didn't know that the Bronx was a decent distance from the WTC and many thought I was pretty close to the carnage.

HeavyLeggedWaistBender
09-11-2009, 11:14 AM
8th grade math class. Principal tells us over the loud speaker, most obnoxious kid says "cool!" (ironically hes now serving in Iraq). Math teacher wouldnt turn it on.

2nd hour science teacher (one of my all time favorites) did. I dont have a gun, I dont like war, and Ive never gotten into a real fight. But the science teacher said "Nuke em til they glow and shoot em in the dark." I thought that was kinda funny.

Got home and watched with the fam. Played with my dog to get away from it for a while, thought it was wierd how she (being a dog) had no idea the world was changing. Sounds dumb maybe but whatever.

My older but little sister is 100% physically healthy after serving more than a year in both Afgahnastan(sp?) and Iraq. But she, like many who've served, still cant watch fireworks without flinching and thinking of their barracks being hit with RPGs almost every night. (Something she thankfully didnt tell us happened until she came back)

I cant imagine what that was like for somebody who had a loved one in one of those buildings. And I am forever grateful to those whove served or continue to do so.

We all support the troops, but none us do enough.

Don Vito
09-11-2009, 11:23 AM
I was in my 7th grade math class and an announcement went over the PA system when the first tower hit; I'm from Boston so there were a lot of people I went to school with who had parents who were pilots, flying on business, or somewhere else of concern so it was bad. The teacher put the TV on right away and we were watching the coverage then we saw the second tower hit right away. One of my friends mom was an AA flight attendant so he left school, another one of my friends dad was an AA pilot so he did the same, but the scariest was another kid in my grades mom was supposed to be in a meeting at the top of the first tower but she was sick and stayed in the hotel so she (along with the other two kids parents) were OK. I did know some kids who knew people who died and that was terrible, my dad worked and still does work cargo at Logan Airport for NWA so he knew a good amount of people who died. At that point, we had no idea what was going to happen from there on out (like most people) so my dad packed up the car with a bunch of 5 gallon water jugs and food and was ready to drive up to NH for a few days.

The one thing I remember most about 9/11 is after getting let out of school early, right when I got home two fighter planes screamed over. I couldn't tell you how low exactly they were, but they were low and loud. As a 7th grader, thats when I realized the severity of the situation. I will never forget that moment or many moments that day.

Brent
09-11-2009, 11:32 AM
Let's see, I was at football practice, and it was my sophomore year of HS. One of the trainers was like, "some plane just hit the WTC" and we were like, "that's crazy how could you not see that coming?" thinking it was an accident.

After practice, I saw like 20 people staring at the TV in the training room and when I peeked in, that's when the first one collapsed. Basically, the school didnt even bother teaching, everyone was just watching TV the whole day. Then they canceled all after-school stuff and left every one leave early.

Splat
09-11-2009, 11:35 AM
being a late sleeper, i remember turning on the tv as i woke up and just the shock of the second plane hitting the towers and the sick feeling of, is this really happening?

Pretty much the same for me I know others in the past have said this but I really thought it was just a movie when I turned on the TV till I turned the channel it was every where I was in shock. :(

MichaelJordanEberle (sabf)
09-11-2009, 11:42 AM
I was in 6th grade and I didn't grasp the enormity of it at all. My French teacher told us at first, but she seemed pretty calm about it. Then my regular teacher came in crying, and that's about when I figured this is probably pretty serious. When I got home, my brother, sister and I watched with our parents pretty much all night. Seeing video of the event still sends chills down my spine. R.I.P. to everyone who lost their lives, and thank you to the everyday heroes who risked themselves to save others.

aNYtitan
09-11-2009, 11:47 AM
I was in the 8th grade, with a clear view of the skyline from my classroom. A friend mentioned some smoke in the distance, and we brushed it off as some factory churning it out. Didn't find out at all until lunch time at around 11:30 when I went to get pizza and the tv was on the site. Just absolute shock, and like many people have said "thought it was a move".

United we stand and we will never forget

The_Dude
09-11-2009, 11:55 AM
Another thread that makes me feel old....

I was working for a business-to-business telemarketing company. I had no idea that anything was going on until my boss walked by and said: "2 planes hit the world trade center and 1 hit the pentagon.... we are under attack". I left my cubicle and sat in his office and listened to the radio fr about an hour.

Then i went and interviewed for my first job in a school. I went home and skipped work for the next 3 days because all i could do was digest all of the information that was available. I remember being dumbfounded by all of the people holding up "missing persons" flyers of their loved ones.... heartbreaking. I finally broke down and shed some tears when i saw footage of the British gov't displaying their flags at half mast and having their band play the star spangled banner. Weird. I don't know why that finally made me break down, but it did.

What i remember most was the incredible amount of outward displays of patriotism in the year that followed the attack. I really miss that and i wish that the strong feelings of patriotism in this country still existed today.

I had a huge lump in my throat last night as i watched Harry Conick Jr sing the national anthem last night.

Thanks to all of the incredibly brave men and women who serve in the military & the police & fire departments. Heroes.

Wootylicous
09-11-2009, 12:19 PM
I remember being in New-York 1 year after the drama. They played amazing grace and it was the most intense moment I ever lived in my life.

RIP to everyone who lost their lives.

The Dynasty
09-11-2009, 12:21 PM
I was in 7th grade at the time and didn't know much about the world trade center but I could tell it was a huge deal of what happen. I was in gym class and didn't know what happen until my foreign language class. All we did that day was watch TV and listen to the radio. I remember going home and it was on every single channel except on Nickelodeon.

God bless all the people who service the United States of America. Also God Bless the victims families of this tragic day. R.I.P. to the victims..We shall never forget.

Edit: I also remembered My grandparents were flying out of Buffalo back to Florida that day and the flight was after it all happened so the flight was delayed.

Borat
09-11-2009, 12:24 PM
I was in San Francisco getting ready for my grandfather's funeral. I was up early and watched pretty much all of it. He was a lifelong fireman so it was a little upsetting to see those firemen go into the buildings before they crumbled. My grandma was super pissed though cause she could tell everyone was in shock about the attacks while attending the funeral.

JFLO
09-11-2009, 12:42 PM
I was in my 7th grade math class and I remember another teacher coming in and telling my teacher what had happened. Then, my class went out to the hallway to watch what had happened on a television.

I like most young kids at the time really didn't realize what was going on, I didn't soak it in like I do now. I remember one of the first things that I saw on the television was Osama Bin Laden's picture, but I still didn't know who he was or if he had anything to do with the horrible and awful events that had just processed.

I can't imagine the terror that went through the people's minds and the families that they belonged too. My thoughts and prayers are with those who have passed and the families involved.

diabsoule
09-11-2009, 12:44 PM
I was sleeping when it happened. I had graduated high school in May and was just working for a friend of mine at the time. My mom came into my room to wake me up and said "a plane flew into the World Trade Center". I rolled over and said "it was probably a Cesna or something like that." She came in a second time and said "another plane has flown into the World Trade Center!" At this point I started to wake up but hadn't got out of bed when I heard her scream "A plane has flown into the Pentagon!" For some reason hearing that a plane was purposely flown into the Pentagon got my blood boiling. I was angrier about that than the WTC. A couple of months later I tried joining the military.

tjsunstein
09-11-2009, 12:48 PM
I remember vividly being in my humanities class in 6th grade and being moved into a different classroom to gather around a TV. I was surprised that the teachers had us watch the footage because most of the kids were too immature to grasp the events that were happening. I have a mental image in my head, I know who I was sitting with, I know who was called to the main office over the loud speaker, I know the kids that were making jokes about, and I remember coming home to my mom, dad, and sister, who was 7 at the time, watching tv. Every channel had coverage. From the local broadcasts to nickelodeon and espn. It was one of those things that you hated to watch but couldn't take your eyes off of. I fell asleep on my couch to 9/11 coverage. Every time I watch those planes hit the building, a piece of me cries inside. Like someone previous to this post said, we had the strongest display of patriotism the whole year following 9/11. I feel like that has faded a bit. Why? I'm not sure. I can't believe it has been 8 years. That's unreal. Like many others on this board I'm sure, I have family serving in the military and know some kids I graduated with that are enlisted. Take a moment to remember those that passed on that day, and take a moment to thank those who are fighting for our freedom. Never Forgotten, 9/11/01. God bless the victims, their families, and America.

Jughead10
09-11-2009, 12:49 PM
I was sleeping when it happened. I had graduated high school in May and was just working for a friend of mine at the time. My mom came into my room to wake me up and said "a plane flew into the World Trade Center". I rolled over and said "it was probably a Cesna or something like that." She came in a second time and said "another plane has flown into the World Trade Center!" At this point I started to wake up but hadn't got out of bed when I heard her scream "A plane has flown into the Pentagon!" For some reason hearing that a plane was purposely flown into the Pentagon got my blood boiling. I was angrier about that than the WTC. A couple of months later I tried joining the military.

That's interesting. Sometimes around here in the greater NYC area, I feel like we neglect to remember that people also loss their lives in Pentagon and that field in Pennsylvania.

Scott Wright
09-11-2009, 12:54 PM
I was in college and had just hopped out of the shower and was getting ready for class when my roommate called me to the TV to watch. Then I had to leave for class but they sent everyone home right away. Got back to the apartment and watched the coverage all day long.

It's weird but right away as it happened one of my roommates and I said it was probably Osama Bin Laden behind it. Not sure how we knew about him then.

Anyway, I am glad to see everyone remembering this important day and sharing their memories.

aNYtitan
09-11-2009, 12:56 PM
Like Jughead just said we also have to remember is the plane that crashed in Pennsylvania, and those people that risked their lives in order to save a multitude of others. I look back on it, and I feel those citizens are overlooked, because what must have been going through their minds at the time is something I always wanted to know

tjsunstein
09-11-2009, 12:59 PM
I'm watching tribute videos on youtube right now and I can't imagine what these families have gone through the last 8 years.

dolphinfan2k5
09-11-2009, 01:50 PM
I posted this in the sig thread, but I might as well post it in this. Something I made, sort of a tribute or whatever.

My heart goes out to everyone who lost someone that day, I can't imagine the pain.

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/8881/rememberkb.jpg

I was in my 6th grade class, and it was my teacher's birthday. We all planned that day to silly string her when she came back into the class at a certain point. So we did, and I think she started crying. We hadn't been told. That must have been the worst. I still remember her saying at one point, it's ok a lot worse things have happened today. The rest is kind of a blur. None of us really knew what was going on at all.

Rosebud
09-11-2009, 02:03 PM
That day started with me going to the hospital to have an external brace drilled out of my leg, we then had a celebratory lunch and on the drive home heard about it on a mock news program so we thought it was just a poor attempt at humor until we got home and cnn told us that was not the case.

TitleTown088
09-11-2009, 02:24 PM
I was in San Francisco getting ready for my grandfather's funeral. I was up early and watched pretty much all of it. He was a lifelong fireman so it was a little upsetting to see those firemen go into the buildings before they crumbled. My grandma was super pissed though cause she could tell everyone was in shock about the attacks while attending the funeral.

Sheesh, Double-whammy. That sounds like a sad day to say the least.

no bare feet
09-11-2009, 02:37 PM
I read a great article today explaining how the country has changed since 9/11. it may be to political to post in here. New York Times has it up on their website. Betraying Our Dead is the title.

I don't want political argument but wow has our country changed for the worse since that horrific event. You would think an event of that nature would make a country more focused on an internal level than worrying about external factors. Changing internally would then in turn change views and approaches externally in a natural way.

Still don't want to overshadow this day of remembrance but some of those folks wjho lost their lives would be turnign in their graves.

Brent
09-11-2009, 02:46 PM
New York Times has it up on their website. Betraying Our Dead is the title.
You mean the NY Post.

P-L
09-11-2009, 02:56 PM
I read a great article today explaining how the country has changed since 9/11. it may be to political to post in here. New York Times has it up on their website. Betraying Our Dead is the title.

I don't want political argument but wow has our country changed for the worse since that horrific event. You would think an event of that nature would make a country more focused on an internal level than worrying about external factors. Changing internally would then in turn change views and approaches externally in a natural way.

Still don't want to overshadow this day of remembrance but some of those folks wjho lost their lives would be turnign in their graves.
Very good article, but too political to discuss.

DeepThreat
09-11-2009, 03:07 PM
I was in second grade. There were second grade time rumors going around. I heard that we had been bombed, that there was a plane crash, that there were four plane crashes, and some other crazy stuff. When my mom picked me up, she said that there had been a terrorist attack and such. I don't remember it very well, to be honest.

T-RICH49
09-11-2009, 03:21 PM
I was at home sick.when I woke up I turned my sterio on and heard two planes hit the WTC.I quickly got out of bed and turned the tv on.Absolutely shocked and sick(for a whole different reason) to see the WTC crumbled into a heap

Stash
09-11-2009, 03:21 PM
I was a freshman in college here on the west coast and I had an early morning computer science class that day. I remember walking through the dorms on my way to class and seeing a lot more people than normal up and watching TV. Didn't really think much of it at the time, then when I got to class my professor said that we still had to take our test despite what happened that morning. At that point I still had no clue what was going on because he wasn't very specific, so I just took my test and went back to my dorm. I finally found out when all my roommates and some friends were watching the coverage on TV, crazyness.

JT Jag
09-11-2009, 03:25 PM
On September 11th, 2001, I was just 12 years old. I remember it like it was yesterday.

When I got to school in the morning, I made my way to to history class. I still remember my teacher, staring dumbfounded at the class's small television while sitting on her desk.

When the classroom filled in, she explained--- in a way that you can only explain to those innocent of the dark politics of the world--- that America had been attacked, and no one knows how bad it was yet.

Unfortunately, class photos were that day. I may have said a few things that could now be said as being in bad taste and uncharacteristic of the attitude a 12-year-old should exhibit, including but not limited to deadpanning that the Statue of Libery was the next target and those people cheering in the street should be shot.

Looking back at it... I'm rather disappointed at myself and how I reacted mentally. I didn't really take into consideration the loss of 3,000 lives that happened on that morning. Rather, I was just irritated that my older brother, who was scheduled to fly in for a visit on September 13th, would not be able to make the trip for obvious reasons.

Remember, remember the 11th of September
And an evil terrorist plot.
I see no occasion why two towers' eradication
Should ever be forgot.

Halsey
09-11-2009, 03:33 PM
I was sleeping in my barracks room on Pearl Harbor Navy Base and didn't find out until my girlfriend called me at 5:30am Hawaiian time. I remembered not being totally shocked when she first told me "we're being attacked by terrorists" because it was long suspected an attack on American soil was coming. I had no idea the breadth of the attack until I got to a TV.

CJSchneider
09-11-2009, 07:13 PM
First allow me to thank each one of you for sharing the memories you have with the rest of us. No doubt that at one point, perhaps when you read through this, you gave specific attention to your reaction on that day and hopefully, if even for but a second, you were again unified with the person next to you - reconnected by what really matters in life and not by that which is fleeting and momentary.

I find it so very interesting that many of you have shared with us that you were in school when this happened. It was somewhat strange in many ways to imagine the personas I have attached to you as children. I was also in school. My career as an educator was still in its proverbial "conception". I was one month into my student teaching assignment, leading a class that was mine by proxy if you will.

I had been assigned to a Jr./Sr. High school not far from Northwestern State University for student teaching. On that morning, I had just finished teaching my first hour, Jr. High PE class and made my way across to the High School Health and Wellness class. As student trickled in, I could tell something was different. A few of the young men who I had gotten to know in the month I had been there ran in frantically and told my the news. They were in their Woods class, which had a T.V. and radio in the classroom portion of the shop. My first reaction to them was that it was a hoax. I remembered having scheduled a test for Thursday, the first one of my own creation and planning. I thought this was surely a cleverly devised plan to test the "new teacher". How I wish I was right.

A few moments later the inter-com buzzed to life and the Principal of the school made the announcement. Many of the students began to cry. You can imagine how I must have felt. No class academic course-work previous or since has come close to preparing me as a teacher on how to console a room full of people when such an event takes place. After the announcement was finished, the best I could muster was to ask for a moment of silence and to tell the students to remember as much from the day as they could as it would surely be a "watershed moment" in their lives.

To say the rest of the day was surreal would be an understatement. I found myself having a great number of questions, few of which were answered. My younger brother was still on active duty in the U.S. Army stationed in Europe and my thoughts focused on him and on what he may be going through in the hours after the tragedy. I drove home faster that day then any other day I can recall. My wife arrived home to our small apartment with our oldest child, who was 3 at the time, moments after I remember that for a few minutes we stood there in our living room, all three of us, locked in an embrace, crying.

This evening, in a few moments, I will gather my three children together and we will watch one of many tribute specials together. I will break down and explain to them that which the special can not. I hope that such a terrible moment will not take place in their lifetime. Sadly, knowing how the world works at times, I fear the will however. I hope the time spent with them tonght can somehow prepare them for that moment.

Thank you for allowing me to share my thoughts and memories with you here. May we never forget the sacrifice made my so many on that day, the efforts made by countless others afterwords and the even more still who lost loved ones.

awfullyquiet
09-11-2009, 07:42 PM
i'm waiting for the 10th anniversary.

Thumper
09-11-2009, 10:59 PM
I can remember where I was like it was yesterday. My mom woke me up and said that she had to get ready and she wanted me to watch the news and see what was happening. I watched as plane #2 hit a tower and watched as they both collapsed. This was when I was in fourth grade, and I remember it perfectly as if it happened just hours ago, I will never forget, I will always remember.

Watching all of these documentaries makes me sick to my stomach, that somebody had it in themselves to commit such and evil thing, to be so evil as to think they were serving god. It sickens me to think of all of those people who died, to think of how those people must've felt if they were above the floors that were hit, knowing that death was imminent, knowing that your life was over, nobody should ever know that feeling and it makes my insides curdle just thinking of it.

Al Queda is the scum of the earth, and the day we catch Osama Bin Ladin (if he isn't dead already) I would love to see him suffer the worst possible death imaginable, maybe let victims families each throw one stone at him until he is dead. I hate him and everything he stands for with every fiber of my being.

tjsunstein
09-12-2009, 10:33 AM
The worst part is that people were told to continue working in some parts of the buildings.