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J-Mike88
08-07-2010, 05:02 PM
Sadly, this is a thread that I feel will be an issue for quite sometime.
I hate this stuff, but there are a lot of issues both sides disagree on, and a few very big ones. Can that many big ego's comprimise in time to avoid a work stopage?

I try to side in the middle because I realize the owners are the ones who run the show, but the players are the ones who risk injury every single play. But players make so much more than the olden days, they are very well compensated, even the NFL vet minimum.

One thing I know for sure is that officially licensed merchandise is way, WAY over priced. So are tickets, the Sunday Ticket on DirecTV, etc. There's a direct correlation between the skyrocketing wages to the price of things we the fans pay. I don't like it. Not everything in life goes up.

The economy sucks:
Stocks went up and up, then they crashed down.
Real estate went up and up, then they crashed back down.
NHL salaries were chopped in half when they were locked out.
LPGA Tour stops were cut out, prize money shrunk.
The AVP prize money was totally cut down, and now the AVP Tour is barely hanging on.
Nascar attendence is way down.

I would like to see the things we pay for cut in half, and then let's see what it does to the players salaries. You think anyone will quit playing because they're not making as much? Me neither. But I know plenty of people who aren't buying their jerseys direct from the NFL.com site because they can get it for 1/6th the price overseas online. I know plenty of people who don't pay for the Sunday Ticket now because it costs $200 more than it should, or used to.

Here is a good article about some of the issues.

http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2010/08/06/goodells-locker-room-meetings-arent-going-well/?ncid=txtlnkusspor00000002

Domonique Foxworth, Brian Waters, Scott Fujita, Joe Flacco, MJD, etc......

"I mean, that's almost like a slap in the face to our intelligence," Chiefs guard Brian Waters said in a separate phone interview. "We know the owners are paying him. Don't take us for granted as far as our understanding of what's going on here."
"I was hopeful we'd get some more answers," Browns linebacker Scott Fujita said of Goodell's meeting with that team. "I think he came in unprepared for how educated the players were going to be. A lot of guys were concerned about it afterward, and I think kind of shocked for how unprepared he was for these kinds of questions."
At one point during the meeting, in discussing the rookie wage scale, Fujita mentioned that the players had put forth a proposal on that matter months ago but hadn't received a response. Fujita held up a copy of the proposal and asked the commissioner if he'd like him to read it aloud.

"I don't think he wanted me to read it," Fujita said.

In Baltimore, quarterback Joe Flacco peppered Goodell with questions about the rookie wage scale, and whether the owners planned to put in a provision that guaranteed that any savings derived from such a plan would be applied to pay for established veterans. Veterans such as Ray Lewis, Derrick Mason and Matt Birk joined in.

In Jacksonville, star running back Maurice Jones-Drew pressed Goodell on specifics about the owners' plans to expand the season to 18 games, and what they planned to do to compensate players for the extra work and the increased health and injury risks that could come along with that.

What the commissioner has found is an angry attitude among players who are concerned that they'll be locked out in 2011.

"It's looming right now, and when we see Roger, that's what we think about," Foxworth said. "He represents the impending lockout."
"I think Jerry Jones and Dan Snyder would be happy being in the NFC Championship Game every year and deciding who goes to the Super Bowl because they have an endless supply of money. I don't think they're in favor of a salary cap, and I know they're not in favor of revenue-sharing. I don't imagine Jerry Jones' NFL would look too much different from what the players would want. You never heard Jeter and A-Rod complain about what Steinbrenner was doing."

Goodell has repeatedly described the owners as united on CBA matters. As an example, he has cited the owners' collective willingness to allow this season to be played without a salary cap (a consequence of not getting a new deal done before this past March). He also has denied that the owners are planning to lock the players out in 2011 in an effort to get a new deal done, though the players and NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith have said they believe that's exactly what's being planned.

Given the depth of the differences between the two sides on these issues, Aiello said Goodell expected to field these kinds of questions in these meetings. He also said he believed such discussions could be productive.

Brent
08-07-2010, 05:19 PM
It's sad to see it playing out like this, but I'm expecting to see a lockout.

J-Mike88
08-07-2010, 05:42 PM
It's sad to see it playing out like this, but I'm expecting to see a lockout.
You really think it will happen?
Full season lockout?

Brent
08-07-2010, 08:59 PM
You really think it will happen?
Full season lockout?
the owners hold all the power, they'll likely get whatever they can agree on.

my guesses: no salary cap and less revenue sharing.

J-Mike88
08-07-2010, 09:57 PM
the owners hold all the power, they'll likely get whatever they can agree on.
my guesses: no salary cap and less revenue sharing.
God I hope not, ^ there ^.
Even though my team sells out every single game, every single year, and they could raise ticket prices, etc... I still would puke if they permanently got rid of the salary cap. I hate the Yankees and Red Sawks because of that crap.

yourfavestoner
08-08-2010, 01:50 AM
God I hope not, ^ there ^.
Even though my team sells out every single game, every single year, and they could raise ticket prices, etc... I still would puke if they permanently got rid of the salary cap. I hate the Yankees and Red Sawks because of that crap.

The loss of a salary cap wouldn't be nearly as devastating as people think it would be. The main reason why is because it doesn't take nearly as long to make an impact in the pros in football as their is in baseball. Good players are usually heavy contributors by the time they get to their second season.

Secondly, the quarterback is the great equalizer in football. If you've got a good one, you'll usually be competitive. Find a way to restrict the movement of quarterbacks, and you'll keep parity in the league.

And third, the elimination of the salary cap helps medium-to-small market teams, because it removes the cap floor. Sure, some cheap owners will take advantage of this. But it will help teams that draft and develop extremely well by allowing them to reallocate their resources more wisely, instead of handing out stupid deals just to get above the cap floor.

Shiver
08-08-2010, 01:57 AM
The salary cap is nice, but it isn't necessary to maintain the parity. To further YFS's points, which are excellent, the league's TV revenue is evenly distributed and it is substantial. It isn't like that in baseball. The Yankees have their own network in the largest market in the US. That alone keeps every team financially profitable.

bam bam
08-08-2010, 03:27 AM
unions = extortionists. This one is no different.

bam bam
08-08-2010, 03:33 AM
Sadly, this is a thread that I feel will be an issue for quite sometime.
I hate this stuff, but there are a lot of issues both sides disagree on, and a few very big ones. Can that many big ego's comprimise in time to avoid a work stopage?

I try to side in the middle because I realize the owners are the ones who run the show, but the players are the ones who risk injury every single play. But players make so much more than the olden days, they are very well compensated, even the NFL vet minimum.

One thing I know for sure is that officially licensed merchandise is way, WAY over priced. So are tickets, the Sunday Ticket on DirecTV, etc. There's a direct correlation between the skyrocketing wages to the price of things we the fans pay. I don't like it. Not everything in life goes up.

The economy sucks:
Stocks went up and up, then they crashed down.
Real estate went up and up, then they crashed back down.
NHL salaries were chopped in half when they were locked out.
LPGA Tour stops were cut out, prize money shrunk.
The AVP prize money was totally cut down, and now the AVP Tour is barely hanging on.
Nascar attendence is way down.

I would like to see the things we pay for cut in half, and then let's see what it does to the players salaries. You think anyone will quit playing because they're not making as much? Me neither. But I know plenty of people who aren't buying their jerseys direct from the NFL.com site because they can get it for 1/6th the price overseas online. I know plenty of people who don't pay for the Sunday Ticket now because it costs $200 more than it should, or used to.

Here is a good article about some of the issues.

http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2010/08/06/goodells-locker-room-meetings-arent-going-well/?ncid=txtlnkusspor00000002

Domonique Foxworth, Brian Waters, Scott Fujita, Joe Flacco, MJD, etc......


http://www.amazon.com/Economics-One-Lesson-Shortest-Understand/dp/0517548232/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1281256178&sr=8-1
http://mises.org/store/Human-Action-The-Scholars-Edition-P119.aspx

You need it.