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BigBanger
09-09-2010, 05:27 PM
Round 1 Players



AJ Green, WR, Georgia, Jr.
http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/126/ajgreen.jpg (http://img121.imageshack.us/i/ajgreen.jpg/)
AJ Green is a special talent that the NFL draft only sees every handful of years. The last prospect that was as big and imposing as Green was Calvin Johnson, and before that, Andre Johnson and before that, Randy Moss. AJ Green is not quite in that elite, rare category of a once-in-a-decade type receiver prospect, but he's about as close as it gets. He's more in the Larry Fitzgerald and Dez Bryant range, which is still pretty damn good. With ridiculous size, great length, very good speed, excellent hands, great focus and concentration, Green routinely makes highlight reel catches, jumps over defenders and simply looks like a man amongst boys. An extremely productive player in the SEC for three years. Against the top competition, Green has shown an innate ability to adjust to poorly thrown balls, shield defenders with his big frame and make tough catches in traffic. Excellent body control and elite level ball skills. Really attacks the ball when its in the air. Vertical threat that is very dangerous and will keep defenses honest. A true #1 receiver prospect that has to be accounted for on almost every single play. Really opens things up for other players and makes everyone around him better, including his quarterback. Green is a good route runner and gets good separation. He lacks that elite quickness in and out of his breaks. He will be very productive at the next level and be a teams top receiving threat for years to come. Good character and very good work ethic. A smart player that has natural instincts for the position. Maybe the most talented player in the 2011 draft. Coming from a pro style offense and is familiar with the NFL route tree. Understands defenses and option routes. Isn't going to do a whole lot after the catch, but will be a dangerous deep threat and a big scoring threat. A safe player for a position that has produced a lot of draft busts. I think Green will be a major contributor for an NFL team and a future Pro Bowl player capable of really exploding. Could be one of the best wide receivers in the NFL in three or four years. Rather thin frame, lanky. Will have to improve strength. Great competitor, focused. Terrific red zone threat. The best player in this draft.

Grade: Elite



Marcell Dareus, DE, Alabama, Jr.
http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/1189/marcelldareus.jpg (http://img15.imageshack.us/i/marcelldareus.jpg/)
Marcell Dareus is the cream of the crop when it comes to this heavy class of defensive linemen. At nearly 320 pounds and well over 6'3'' Dareus already has an NFL frame. With very good athletic ability and lateral quickness, Dareus can play over an offensive tackle, a guard or a center. Extremely versatile linemen with gaudy power. Reminds me of Cullen Jenkins, one of my favorite players in the NFL. Has a similar build as Jenkins (just bigger) coupled with similar athletic ability. Dareus battled through injuries his junior season and still managed to be a force that commanded constant double teams and extra attention. When healthy, Dareus flashed brilliance rarely seen from a defensive tackle. A hard nosed player with a great motor and physicality. Extremely heavy hands and great use of power and leverage. Generates the most force and momentum of any defensive linemen in this class. Incredibly strong and a has frame that is well built. Really explodes off the line of scrimmage and can penetrate the backfield by splitting linemen or powering through with a bullrush. Great balance with a great first step. A surprisingly good natural bender that can take a cut block and power through. Has experience all over the line and can play any defensive line position in a pinch. Best suited for a 34 defensive end role. The best natural 34 defensive end prospect in this draft (along with JJ Watt). Holds up incredibly well at the point of attack. Great leverage and power with a thick lower half that allows him to anchor against double teams. Has violent hands and excellent handwork. A rare defensive line prospect that can really rush the quarterback. Has experience playing 43 defensive end, where he was shockingly effective and explosive for such a big man. Versatile and can be utilized in a myriad of ways as a pass rusher. Was not as productive due to injuries and limited starting experience. Best days are ahead of his. A finisher that knows how to finish a play. Great motor. Relentless. Very smart and instinctive. Plays with his eyes up. Recognizes gadget plays, such as screens and reverses. Plays gap assignment. Very smart player. Great athlete. Exceptional body lean and footwork. A natural pass rusher with pass rushing instincts. Needs to improve with leverage against the run on a consistent basis, but his run stuffing ability is not on the same level as his pass rushing ability at this time. Can stack and shed defenders. Great ability to separate and gain outside leverage. Well coached. A complete player that is capable of dominating as a run defender and pass rusher. Very few flaws in his game. Stamina, fatigue and lack of starting experience are the only real negatives. Didn't put up great numbers in college. My third favorite interior defensive line prospect behind Ndamukong Suh and Haloti Ngata. Should be a dominating force that anchors a defensive front for the next 10 years.

Grade: Top 3



Patrick Peterson, DB, LSU, Jr.
http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/3598/patrickpeterson.jpg (http://img145.imageshack.us/i/patrickpeterson.jpg/)
Patrick Peterson is considered by many to be the "cleanest," best or most talented prospect in the 2011 Draft. With as much talent as any prospect in this draft, Peterson brings unparalleled size for the cornerback position. At 6'2'' and 220 pounds, Peterson has the size and strength few corners possess. Combine that rare size with blazing 4.3 speed and you have one of the biggest freak specimens any draft will ever offer. Peterson is coming off a very good junior season and brings versatility with the return game. With the size, speed and elite ball skills, Peterson could be an intriguing prospect as a free safety, where I think he would be extremely good, and maybe better at the next level. There are questions concerning his ability to drop deep into zones, make safety reads and take proper angles. Peterson will be used primarily as a cornerback once he enters the NFL, but a later transition could be very possible if he does not turn out to be the shutdown corner some expect him to be. Peterson has good hips and change of direction skills, showing fluidity in coverage although he does play a little too high on occasion. He does, however, struggle with footwork (at times) and takes false steps, which causes him to get beat quickly off the line of scrimmage. With as much speed as Peterson has, his burst is not at the same elite level and he will struggle covering quick-twitch receivers that can run short, underneath patterns in the middle of the field. Coverage skills were also exposed while in off coverage where quick posts and comebacks can cause Peterson to give up ground and easy receptions. He's much better in press coverage where he can use his excellent jam and length to hinder routes and timing with a wide receiver and quarterback. Will give up his fair share of receptions early in his career. He is not a shutdown cornerback prospect, and probably never will be, but he has the potential to be an elite player. Peterson does have incredible ball skills and excellent hands, which may be the best in this draft from any defensive back. Made some acrobatic interceptions and showed great ball skills and natural ability to undercut routes. An extremely tough and competitive player, and it shows on the field. A leader when on the field and has an aura about him that just oozes something special. Great tackler and does an excellent job in run support and making immediate tackles when giving up a reception. A tough competitor who never takes a play off and shows a great fiery motor. Likes to stick his nose in a run play and hit someone. A hard worker with virtually no character concerns to speak of. I don't think he'll ever be an elite, shutdown corner, but I do think he'll be a playmaker at the next level; unlike any cornerback we may have ever seen. Tons of talent and still has upside to become a better pure cover corner. I do think he has more potential be an elite free safety, an extremely rare one, then an elite cornerback. Either way, I think this will be one of the best players in the NFL by year three.

Grade: Top 3



Von Miller, DE/OLB, Texas A&M, Sr.
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Miller is one of the few prospects in this draft that will garner an "elite" label from a good amount of people. Miller is, without question, the most proven pass rusher in this draft. With the most athleticism and speed as any pass rusher in this draft, Miller shows the ability to be a perennial double digit sack guy. Miller is a good fit for 34 schemes as a weak side backer. Really great competitor with a terrific motor. Miller plays hard against the run and gives maximum effort. Tremendous range and closing ability. Phenomenal burst. Terrific in pursuit and looks comfortable in space. Still lacks the instincts and awareness in pass coverage, dropping into zones and feeling receiving threats behind him. Miller is, however, not great against the run and may struggle with NFL tackles early in his career. His size is the only thing that keeps him from being an elite player on my board. At just 6'2'' and around 240 pounds, he will struggle with the strength of NFL offensive tackles. He does have extremely quick hands and tremendous footwork. Miller has one of the most explosive first steps I have ever seen.  A tremendous advantage that allows him to set up offensive tackles. Has Derrick Brooks-like speed and quickness off the edge. The best jab step I've seen from a college player where he rushes up field and then quickly cuts inside and offensive tackle, gaining inside leverage. A Clay Matthews like jab step. Very strong punch and a solid bull rush that will improve with better strength. An energizer bunny. Terrific work ethic and top notch intangibles. For all the risk with pass rushers, especially in this draft, Miller has the least risk. A sure fire starter that will have Pro Bowl potential. Will need to develop his strength to become more of a complete player. Needs to develop more pass rushing moves (counter moves) and use his hands better to disengage from blockers, instead of relying on his speed and quickness. Will give up ground to get around a blocker instead of stacking and shedding with proper technique. Did disappear at times and his play wasn't always consistent. Miller is extremely productive and an incredible pass rusher. Great production: 27.5 sacks over the last two years with 39 tackles for loss. A naturally gifted pass rusher with tremendous body control, balance, athleticism, leverage and finishing ability. Good awareness and solid instincts. Tough. Leader. Fluid. Minimal question marks. Will develop into one of the best pure pass rushers in the NFL. Relentless attitude. Incredibly quick. Elite natural ability and tremendous potential. Should be the prize pass rusher from this class.  

Grade: Top 3



J.J. Watt, DE, Wisconsin, Jr.
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Watt is another first round caliber 34 defensive end to add to this incredibly deep class of five-techniques. Watt possess ideal size and great strength. A terrific motor and maybe the best character of any player in this years draft. A relentless player that constantly makes hustle plays. Never quits on a play. Very good athleticism and really performed much better in the Combine than most expected. Coming off a dominant junior season where he notched 21 tackles for loss. Incredibly stout at the point of attack and does a phenomenal job of relocating the line of scrimmage. Constantly lives in opposing teams backfields. Very strong, very long and does a really nice job of shedding blockers. Great hand placement and excellent length. Works better in traffic as opposed to further away from the ball in space. Quick enough to shoot gaps on a consistent basis and possess great balance to make plays in the backfield. Has excellent technique and plays with outstanding leverage. Has a knack for keeping his eyes up when rushing the quarterback and getting his hands up into passing lanes, batting balls at the line of scrimmage. Great instincts and awareness. A very good pass rusher that has the potential to post double digit sack totals on a yearly basis. Not special and will lack the explosion off the line of scrimmage to be an ideal fit in 43 fronts. If drafted by a 43 defense, he may never live up to his top ten projection since he lacks the ability to be a constant pressure pass rusher, and would probably better suited as a 43 defensive tackle (where you really don't want to play and negate his strengths). Watt certainly isn't a flashy player and doesn't have a ton of upside, but he's a phenomenal leader, a high energy and high character guy that could ignite a defense. An extremely hard worker that is dedicated to the game. Focused and determined. Incredibly passionate. Ideal 34 defensive end and similar in a lot of ways to Aaron Smith coupled with Chris Long's athletic ability. He will be an excellent player for the next 10 years. One of the safest players in the draft, and much better than most consider. Could wind up being the best player from this entire draft if used properly.

Grade: Top 5




Julio Jones, WR, Alabama, Jr.
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Jones is a big, physical wide receiver that has seen a huge rise in his draft stock after tearing the Combine apart. He's 6'2'' and 220 pounds, built like a rock. Running a sub 4.40, Jones became some people's #1 wide receiver in this years draft. On the field, Jones is coming off a very good junior season after a very disappointing sophomore season. A really good blocker and looks like a complete warrior on the field, which was further validated after it was learned he had a broken bone in his foot during the Combine workouts. Very strong and tough to tackle. A great competitor. A team player that gives tremendous effort. Plays with great passion and emotion. An excellent route runner and does a great job of getting separation by using very good technique. Very controlled while running routes. Solid hands, but has had issues with drops throughout his career. Good ball skills, but didn't make many high difficulty catches with corners draped all over him. Great character and work ethic. Very smart and excellent football IQ. Did not play up to his Combine numbers and looked more like a 4.5 guy on the field. Wasn't a great timer of jump balls. Lacks that elite quickness in and out of his breaks and wont gain great separation despite his excellent route running ability. Battled through injuries throughout his career. Plays with a style of play that may invite future injuries throughout his professional career as well. A solid, physical receiver that will do the majority of his damage as a possession receiver with the short to intermediate routes. Works the middle of the field and understands zone concepts. Finds the open holes in defenses. Will contribute in the running game. Compares well to Hines Ward and Anquan Boldin in regards to blocking and effort. A complete player, that has potential to become a true stud #1 wide receiving option for a team that will command constant attention and double teams. Not that elite prospect some have made him out to be, but he will be a very good, productive professional. A winner. A step below AJ Green despite having more upside. Grew on me throughout the draft process and became one of my favorite players.

Grade: Top 5




Aldon Smith, DE, Missouri, So. (Rs)
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Aldon Smith is a unique prospect with a unique skill set that I think makes him pretty special, but a little risky at the same time. Smith is a very tall and lanky player, but possess deceptive strength. A guy that you expect, just looking at his size and rather thin looking frame, to be a guy that uses speed and quickness to beat opposing players and be little more than a situational pass rusher. Smith is anything but a situational pass rusher and he's surprisingly stout at the point of attack despite playing with poor leverage. Smith does have unique quickness and athletic ability for a pass rushing defensive linemen, but his athleticism tends to get very overrated. Smith has the strength to kick inside and play over an offensive guard where he's usually at his best. Smith has a unique cutting ability that allows him to setup offensive linemen. He is able to fake to the outside and start upfield, and then quickly cut inside an offensive tackle, gain inside leverage and work towards the quarterback. Smith also displays a powerful swat move that he has perfected since his freshman year where he will swat a linemen's hands away and knock them off balance. Smith is a natural swatter that prefers to get inside an offensive linemen instead of running around an offensive linemen. Smith is able to time his swat perfectly. Just as a linemen is attempting to punch him, he swats their arms away, which causes them to drop their head, lose their balance, which gives Smith a free run at the quarterback. It's instant pressure and he uses violent hands and an incredible punch. Smith does struggle against the run and with his upright style of play, he will get blown off the line of scrimmage three to five yards down field. Smith attempts to just back peddle, and then throw a linemen off to the side, giving up several yards and allowing the offense to move the original line of scrimmage three yards into the teeth of the defense. Smith may struggle early against the run and will have to play with better technique in stopping the run. He is raw as a run defender and may never develop into anything more than a merely adequate run stopper. His lack of burst and speed to turn the corner makes me question if he's going to be the pass rusher some make him out to be. Very similar to Jason Pierre-Paul, but not as athletic or naturally gifted. He is a little stiff in his hips and struggles as a bender. Played through injuries as a junior and had a down season. Looked very slow and was mere shadow of himself. I don't know what kind of player Smith is and I don't know what kind of career he will have if he's not in an ideal situation. Still raw, but lacking great upside or potential. Should be able to produce early in his career. His power and strength will translate very well to the next level. He's about as NFL ready as any defensive player in this draft.

Grade: Top 10



Ryan Kerrigan, DE, Purdue, Sr.
http://img808.imageshack.us/img808/2498/kerrigan.jpg (http://img808.imageshack.us/i/kerrigan.jpg/)
Kerrigan is another top caliber Boilermaker defensive end that the program has been turning out in recent years. And like the previous three star defensive end prospects, Anthony Spencer / Ray Edwards / Shaun Philips, he will probably be underrated for a while, at the same time, outperforming numerous players that will go ahead of him. With more flashy and athletic speed rushers (with not nearly the all-around game that Kerrigan has) being the hot commodity, they will go much higher come draft day because of words like "potential" and "speed" and "size," or a combination of all three. Kerrigan isn't going to be a guy labeled as disappointing because he gets everything out of his talents. He has a phenomenal motor that never quits. He's a high character guy. Kerrigan plays the game with great discipline, incredible instincts and excellent technique. His great uses of leverage, his athleticism / flexibility, instincts and his football IQ are going to make him a successful defensive end at the next level. Kerrigan plays with heavy hands and great power in his upper body, really showing a natural ability to get under opposing offensive tackles and driving them back, getting them off balance and attacking the line of scrimmage. Does a great job playing low and gaining leverage. Uses very good hand placement. With a great bull rush and slip move, he combines that with a rip move that creates a lot of pressure on the quarterback. He does show the ability to turn the corner or simply overpower offensive tackles. He has underrated athletic ability and good quickness off the edge, and scrapping down the line. Has a knack for getting off the ball the second it's snapped. Kerrigan has exceptional balance and a solid burst. He can really close to the ball carrier. Has the ability to play both end positions and he has enough size to kick inside on certain situations. Stout against the run, but needs improving. Does a very good job keeping outside leverage and sealing the edge. Does struggle to disengage from blockers on running plays directed directly at him. He is excellent at playing on the other side of the ball and does a good job getting off the line quickly and relocating the line of scrimmage. Very smart, hard working player that maximizes his talents. Finishes plays and hustles. Works through trash very well. Good tackler and brings his feet with him. Extremely productive, but does have limited upside. A definite first round defensive end with a lot of versatility for base 43 defenses. One of my favorite players in the country. He will be a steal come draft day just like Spencer, Edwards and Philips were (who would be top 20 picks if their drafts were to be re-done). He may be the best defensive linemen in the 2011 Draft. A complete player that plays the run and pass equally effectively. Not overly athletic or explosive and wont be a consistent double digit sack guy. Incredible production and tons of experience.

Grade: Top 10



Cameron Jordan, DE, California, Sr.
http://img203.imageshack.us/img203/7813/cameronjordan.jpg (http://img203.imageshack.us/i/cameronjordan.jpg/)
Jordan is an emerging defensive line prospect that projects to be one of the best 34 defensive end prospects in the 2011 Draft. Jordan is an incredibly long player with excellent strength and power. Jordan doesn't look like a physically dominating specimen, but he's a technician when it comes to stuffing the run. Jordan is probably the best run stuffing defensive linemen I have ever seen. From a pure technique standpoint, he is flawless. His leverage is phenomenal and, by far, his greatest attribute. His understand of taking on double teams, stacking, shedding and then slipping a double team is already at a Pro level, and something I've never seen another college defensive player do on such a consistent basis. Jordan consistently powers through double teams, clogs holes and still has the ability to make plays. Jordan has a tall, lanky frame capable of adding weight. He could really develop physically at the pro level and play at around 300 pounds. Jordan is very athletic for a 34 defensive end, but not athletic for a 43 defensive end. Jordan is simply not a 43 defensive end even though some may say he is scheme diverse. When Jordan is too far away from the quarterback, he is out of his comfort zone and will struggle to apply pressure on the quarterback. He does not have the speed to run around offensive tackles and he is not a natural pass rusher from the 43 end position. Jordan relies on his quickness and initial burst to gain leverage and power through multiple blockers. Very strong, active hands that allow him to collapse the pocket and create a lot of pressure. Capable of delivering heavy punches and getting off blockers. A relentless motor with a great work ethic. Jordan is simply an animal. A guy that will dominate in a 34 defense for a decade and a guy I believe will be one of the best 34 defensive ends in the NFL. An absolute boss that is capable of make an early impact right away for an NFL team. Like Tyson Alualu, he could really emerge as a favorite for many teams and go a lot higher than people expect. He's the kind of guy you want on your side. Wont put up sack numbers and isn't flashy, but he will dominate the line of scrimmage and make everyone around him better.

Grade: Top 10



Prince Amukamara, CB, Nebraska, Sr.
http://img832.imageshack.us/img832/4816/princeamakamuara.jpg (http://img832.imageshack.us/i/princeamakamuara.jpg/)
Amukamara is the top rated senior corner in the 2011 Draft on most people's accounts. He has excellent size for an NFL corner and shows decent run support ability. He attacks running backs on toss plays or sweeps in his area, and he does a great job making the quick stop. An average tackler with poor technique. He does not wrap up on most tackles to the perimeter, instead staying low and cutting a runner to the ground. He is not as strong against the run while in traffic and closer to the middle of the field, and will struggle against bigger, physical backs. He does show very good aggressiveness on quick screen passes to wide receivers or quick hitches and slants. Amukamara is going to be known best for his aggressive style of play. He jumps routes and does a great job trusting his eyes, reacting and then closing on the ball, whether it be through the air or against the run. Amukamara is incredibly instinctive and has great field awareness. He has the ability to make flat footed reads, read the quarterbacks eyes, feel where the receiver is and then explode through the throwing lane. He does a great job with route recognition, and his foot speed and natural burst allow him to close quickly on the ball, undercutting receivers. Tremendous change of direction skills, shows a very strong plant / drive leg. Very rarely will you see Amukamara slip or lose his balance, but he is a little tight hipped and plays high. He's physical at the line of scrimmage and shows a very good, disruptive jam. Long arms and plays with good extension. Really does an excellent job wearing down a receiver and making opposing players work for everything they get. Amukamara is a solid athlete, but lacks that elite top end speed. He plays very physical and uses his hands very well when slowing down receivers and disrupting timing routes. He has shown decent makeup speed when he is beat, but struggles finding the ball. Very confident in his natural abilities and shows excellent patience, and maintains solid positioning and use of angles. Scheme diverse. Can play man coverage and zone equally well. Does a great job of using his safety help when he gets it. He is a gambler and will get caught cheating, giving up catches. Is a little too physical at times and might struggle with illegal contact or holding penalties early in his career. Will get beat deep due to overaggressive play at the line of scrimmage. Amukamara needs to do a better job understanding his own abilities and how much cushion is necessary. He has average hands and average ball skills. He breaks up a lot of passes. His combination of size, strength, athleticism, acceleration, change of direction and recognition skills will make for one of the best cornerback prospects in recent years. Amukamara is a high character guy and a real student of the game. Very new to the position (only two years of starting experience) and has a lot of upside. A natural corner with great instincts for the position. I think Prince Amukamara has the potential to turn into one of the elite corner's in the game. He has all the tools to be a great NFL player. He is a suffocating defender with phenomenal strength for the position, but he is gambler.

Grade: Top 10





Mike Pouncey, OG, Florida, Sr.
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Pouncey has been the consensus #1 interior linemen in the draft ever since he decided to stay for his senior season. His twin brother, Maurkice Pouncey, had a Pro Bowl rookie season with the Steelers at Center. His success makes Mike Pouncey a sought after commodity as teams will hope to strike gold just like the Steelers did. Pouncey doesn't quite possess the same kind of athleticism as his twin brother, but he shows much more of a mauling strength and toughness to his game than Maurkice did when he entered the draft. Not an elite athlete, but he does an excellent job pulling and shows very good footwork and has nimble feet. Can get to the second level and does a good job blocking linebackers. He does a real nice job of locking on to defenders and moving them off the ball. He tends to struggle with quick defenders and positioning when he gets beat. He will let defenders get on the outside shoulder and he'll lose the leverage battle since he doesn't move his feet properly, and this was exposed even more when he moved to Center during his senior season. Pouncey looked very uncomfortable with snapping the ball, then immediately engaging a defensive linemen. He does a great job blocking down and washing linemen in the running game. Prototypical in-line blocker in run heavy / man-to-man schemes. He does a solid job at the second level, but he will bend at the waist, lose his balance and get knocked to the ground too often. He needs to continue refining his technique and play with more consistent leverage. When he keeps his hips low, he gets great leverage and can really push linemen off the ball. Excellent pass protector and has an incredibly strong base. Strong hands, excellent punch and terrific hand placement. Always keeps his hands inside a defenders body and really impedes a pass rush. Great anchor ability and terrific balance in pass protection. Very good size, but will have to continue building his strength in the weight room to handle the elite power of the top defensive linemen in the NFL. An extremely safe player that wont surprise you. Pouncey is a guy who will start from day 1 at offensive guard and be a stalwart for the next ten to twelve years. Was NFL ready last year. Could be a perennial Pro Bowl player and maybe even an All-Pro on occasion. Does not project well to Center and really struggled snapping the ball, especially out of the shotgun offense, but he could play there if needed as a stop gap. His struggles during his senior year only helped his growth for the transition to the next level as he constantly had to battle from a position of weakness. The best linemen in the 2011 NFL Draft and maybe the most NFL ready player in the entire Draft. Not much upside or potential, but an immediate starter who works hard and plays with a nasty demeanor. Tough player and a great competitor. Will go higher in the draft than people expect.

Grade: Top 15



Robert Quinn, DE, North Carolina, Jr.
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Quinn is easily among the most talented players in this years draft, and in my opinion, the single most talented. In a draft full of top end talent coupled with question marks, Quinn is yet another highly talented, highly risky prospect to add to the list. Quinn has not played football in over a year due to a season long suspension. Going off of just his sophomore tape, he shows to be the most naturally gifted pass rusher in this draft class, possessing great potential and a tremendous amount of upside. With an improved junior season, Quinn could have developed into a rare pass rushing prospect that could have been drafted 1st overall. Now uncertainty and risk emerge with this talented prospect. Quinn also has a tumor in his brain that has teams worrying over his medical condition. If healthy and when on the field, Quinn is as talented as any defensive end prospect I have ever seen. Very solid frame with good height and bulk. Very good speed and the second best first step in the entire draft. Incredibly explosive off the line of scrimmage. Very good jab step that sets up his speed rush, allowing him to run around tackles. Uses his hands well to rip and dip when running the arc. Can consistently run around offensive tackles. Did rely on his supreme athleticism quite a bit while tallying his 11 sacks and 19 tackles for loss. Strong hands and can bullrush, but needs to improve his leverage on a consistent basis. Questionable motor and disappeared in games. Showed to be a playmaker as he forced 6 fumbles, doing a great job of dislodging the ball from the quarterback. Really finished a sack off with a good hard hit on the quarterback when he had a blindside shot. But did miss a lot of tackles in the backfield and didn't always break down and use proper tackling form. Needs to improve on finishing plays, will get wild and out of control. Still very raw and will need to develop more pass rush moves. Only a one year wonder and is a risky roll of the dice. Tends to play high and upright and will get punched in the chest, preventing his pass rush. Would disappear at times since he did not use a good variety of pass rush moves, which may cause him to struggle early in his career. Only average against the run and will have to play with more discipline and understanding of the nuances for the position. Did get pushed off the line of scrimmage and not very stout at the point of attack. Would lose sight of the ball and get turned around. Athletic, can chase and close from behind very well. So athletic he has garnered a lot of talk and consideration for 34 outside linebacker. I don't think he's an outside linebacker and he's best suited to be a 43 defensive end, but he could rush from a two-point stance. Good character and a hard worker. Still has a lot of development to do and really needs to improve on his technique to maximize that incredible potential. Has the potential to be an All-Pro that averages 12 sacks per season. Will have growing pains until he develops his technique and a repertoire. Lacks experience and has very average awareness and instincts. If he played as a junior he had the talent to be the best overall player in this draft. Rare ability, but a ton of risk drop him down my board.

Grade: Top 15




Anthony Castonzo, OT, Boston College, Sr.
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Castonzo is the prototypical, long limbed left tackle prospect that teams covet. With excellent quickness and athletic ability for a man that's 6'7'' and around 310 pounds, Castonzo shows the ability to play left tackle at the NFL level. With experience at right tackle, Castonzo could come in and start right away for a team at either tackle spot. With great fluidity and an ability to sink his hips, bend at the knees and get low, Castonzo can out-leverage opposing defensive players and anchor down. This is a rare prospect with such great fluidity for the position, especially for his size, that you wonder how high his ceiling really is. Castonzo is a hard working player with a great motor on the field. Top notch intangibles and great work ethic. Might even be a better student than a college football player, which is really saying something. Castonzo is a prototype for blocking speed rushers. With excellent technique, a great kick step, excellent footwork and good (but inconsistent) hand placement, Castonzo shows the ability to really dominate opposing pass rushers. Although Castonzo shows great technique, he does get a little inconsistent with his technique. He was beat more than you'd like to see. He may overextend at times and get caught out of position. He needs to play with more consistency at the next level and improve his punch, which I see as his biggest area of concern. Will struggle with a bullrush when he plays high and a little soft. Lacks power in his lower half and is not fully developed physically. Castonzo is also an excellent run blocker. He's not a powerful inline blocker, but he can hold the line of scrimmage, move his feet and seal running lanes. Castonzo shows a great ability to get out of his stance quickly. He really does a phenomenal job getting to the second level on running plays, which shows his quickness and athleticism. Castonzo was a guy who continuously got better each and every season at the college level. With a great frame, at around 310 pounds, he can add even more weight and power to his frame, which he will have to do (especially in his lower half). With more coaching he can continue improving on his technique and sure up his consistency. A typical Boston College linemen thats entering the NFL with a high football IQ, well coached, great character, hard working and a bit of a nasty disposition. There is nothing in Castonzo's game that is lacking for a future franchise left tackle. Still has a bit of upside, but probably wont ever be a dominant left tackle. More than capable of making a handful of Pro Bowls and being an anchor for a franchises blind side for the next decade. Tons of experience, started 53 straight games. Needs to get stronger and anchor better. Will struggle early in his career with stronger opposing linemen.

Grade: Top 15



Muhammad Wilkerson, DE, Temple, Jr.
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Wilkerson is an excellent NFL prospect that will tend to float under the radar amongst the bigger names of flashy prospects that went to bigger schools. The Temple prospect has phenomenal NFL size with excellent athletic ability for his natural position of 34 defensive end. At 6'4'' and 315 pounds, Wilkerson already enters the NFL with the frame to start from day 1. Incredible length. Very strong and shoots gaps with relative ease at times. Very aggressive with a terrific motor. A very productive college player that had experience playing all over line in multiple fronts: Played 43 defensive end, 43 defensive tackle and 34 defensive end while at Temple. A very good pass rusher that can split double teams and effectively run stunts, creating openings for other players. Splits double teams while rushing the passer. Basketball background shows on the field as he dips and plays low when rushing the passer. Occupies multiple blockers in the run game and shows the ability to play with his hands and get great extension. Relentless effort to the quarterback. Good bullrush and always moving his feet forward, towards the quarterback. Good balance and strength as a pass rusher. Excellent swim move. Shows he can use his hands well and has the power to swat the hands away of blockers, slipping a linemen and getting around them. A solid run defender that can and should improve into a complete player. More of a one dimensional prospect that's a better pass rusher than run stuffer. Tallied 16.5 sacks over his last two seasons with 23.5 tackles for loss. Wilkerson struggles with leverage and tends to play upright due to his height. Will get pushed off the ball with strong, aggressive run blockers. Also tends to get washed down the line due to poor leverage. Will get pushed out of his gap or take himself out of plays with his aggressive, up field style of play. Still raw as a pass rusher (needs to improve hand work) and run defender. Played in the MAC and did not see top level competition. Does play the run with good awareness (keeps contain and plays within the defense) and works in traffic fairly well. Has solid instincts for the position. Has as much potential as any defensive linemen in this draft. An excellent prospect and terrific fit for 34 fronts. Could develop into one of the better 34 defensive ends in the NFL within the next three years if he improves his technique and plays with better leverage. Clean off the field with no character concerns. Will be a steal and shouldn't fall out of round 1.

Grade: Top 15




Blaine Gabbert, QB, Missouri, Jr.
http://img837.imageshack.us/img837/2650/blainegabbert.jpg (http://img837.imageshack.us/i/blainegabbert.jpg/)
Gabbert possess very good arm strength, solid accuracy, top notch intangibles, great character and a high football I.Q. He has proven to be one of the few top quarterback prospects in this draft that has what you look for physically, combined with the maturity and knowledge to run an NFL system. Has shown great leadership qualities and intangibles, which makes you think he's capable of being a franchise quarterback. Great work ethic and focus. Dedicated to the game and improving his play. Gabbert is coming from a spread system that was mostly run out of the shotgun with five wide receiver sets. Most will knock the spread system, but Sam Bradford showed that a pass heavy spread system is not necessarily a bad thing since the NFL is changing to more four and five wide receiver sets on a more regular basis. Gabbert does show the ability to read defenses prior to the snap and find his open receiver before the ball is snapped. His system did make reads easy. Gabbert can get rid of the ball quickly, with timing and accuracy. Good field vision and recognizes blitzes, but he needs to improve in letting the play develop before getting the ball out too fast. Will leave plays on the field. He does understand hot routes and communication with his receivers. He will reduce sacks. Accurate, but Gabbert's ball placement is inconsistent and a lot of that has to do with his footwork. Gabbert's biggest area of improvement will have to come from his footwork and learning NFL drops. He will have to learn how take the traditional three, five and seven step drop backs and throw the ball with accuracy, timing and anticipation. Since he was mostly a catch, rock and throw quarterback out of the shotgun - dropping back could be a major project filled with growing pains and inconsistent play early on at the next level. Gabbert does have the work ethic, drive, focus and maturity to work on those things and improve his game. He is a raw prospect with less than 30 college starts, but his biggest question marks come with his patience and maneuverability within the pocket. Gabbert will bail out of the pocket far too quickly at times instead of staying in the pocket, sliding up, finding the throwing lane and going through the rest of his progressions. Lacks poise and doesn't show a great feel in the pocket. He does have solid mobility with the speed and quickness to escape and buy time. What you like to see is Gabbert's ability to keep his eyes downfield while moving up or out of the pocket. Instead of tucking it down and taking off like an athlete playing quarterback, he moves up, sucks defenders up and looks for big plays in the passing game. Gabbert has proven to be a top caliber prospect with some rawness and inexperience regarding his footwork. He is, however, advanced when it comes to the nuances of the game. He can hold safeties, manipulate coverage and create throwing lanes with his eyes. He can be decisive. He is a little inconsistent and does miss throws that he should hit. Throws really well in the short to intermediate area. Couple that with leadership qualities, work ethic, intangibles, and football smarts... Gabbert is the closest thing to being a safe pick at the quarterback position that this draft will have to offer. With that said, he's not a special quarterback that teams will look as a can't-pass-up player. The potential to be a complete quarterback is there. He's not a perfect player and his system does draw some concerns with the short passing game and the drop off from his sophomore year, but he will be a franchise quarterback that should be a Top 20 pick in the 2011 Draft.

Grade: Top 20



Brooks Reed, DE/OLB, Arizona, Sr.
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Brooks Reed is not the kind of player that is going to test off the charts or show elite level athleticism. On the small end as far as height and length are concerned. A 5th year senior with only marginal production. Lacks elite athleticism and top end burst or explosion off the line of scrimmage. Reed is not overly stout at the point off attack and will have to learn to play with better leverage. Will get engulfed by bigger blockers at times. What Reed will bring to the table is an unparalleled motor, great character, work ethic, toughness, intensity and leadership. Phenomenal character and the kind of guy you want on your team. Has a passion for the game rarely matched and plays every down at full speed. An excellent football player with a bit of upside as a pass rusher and run stuffer. A good pass rusher with a nice repertoire of pass rush moves including a power spin move. Uses his hands very well and shows natural pass rushing ability, which will only further improve with better technique. Very strong and powerful pass rusher with naturally heavy hands and great power. A lot of upside from a pass rushing standpoint and could be a potential double digit sack guy. Good athleticism and good quickness that translates well to a 34 outside backer role. Will get the edge and turn the corner on opposing offensive tackles, but will be in a deceptive manner. Certainly wont blow by tackles. Has drawn comparisons to Clay Matthews due to his hair and that rare motor, but he does not have quite the potential since he lacks the elite athletic ability and burst off the line of scrimmage Matthews possessed. A hard working overachiever type that still has untapped potential. The type of guy that will maximize his abilities. Very instinctive and smart. Well coached and plays with great discipline. May take a year or two to get his feet wet if drafted as a stand up linebacker, but could develop into a LaMarr Woodley type of backer since they compare better with power, size and athleticism.

Grade: Top 20



Nick Fairley, DT, Auburn, Jr.
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Nick Fairley is one of the most sought after and talked about prospects entering the 2011 draft. With a monstrous junior season, Fairley came out of nowhere to dominate along the defensive line for the defending champion Tigers. Notching 24 TFL and 11.5 sacks, garnering awards and accolades as the best linemen in college football and being named MVP of the championship game. Fairley emerged as a potential #1 overall draft pick until character and work ethic emerged as major red flags. Fairely was an absolute beast, penetrating backfields, piling up sacks, demanding double teams and causing complete chaos for opposing offenses to game plan around. Fariely had a dominant season, but only has one season to show for it, which is a bit of a concern. Fairley showed great strength and power to match great quickness and an excellent burst off the line of scrimmage. Fairley is stout at the point of attack, but did have lapses in his game where he would play high, lose his technique and get blown off the ball. Was it fatigue or just a poor motor where he decided to take plays off? With work ethic concerns and questions swirling around Fairley's character is what makes you wonder if he was just taking plays off. Motor turned off and on like a light switch. One has to proceed with caution and figure out what kind of person you are drafting. He was not able to attend Auburn University out of high school due to poor grades. Has a learning disability. It has also been said that he is lazy with has poor practice habits, and links to colossal draft bust JaMarcus Russell have raised eyebrows. Fell asleep during meetings. Fairley was a dominating player and is more talented than Gerald McCoy. Fairley is very raw and doesn't use his hands very well, sometimes hardly ever. He relies on his athletic ability for the position to run around guys instead of proper technique, which comes back to coaching (not adapting to it) and being a one year wonder. Fairley also doesn't look the part of an athletic marvel and doesn't seem to be a gym rat as he possess rather thin looking limbs and a thin lower half. Fairley is more country strong that could improve his strength with weight training. He is treated like a sure thing. A can't-miss-prospect, but he's anything but. He has red flags surrounding his work ethic, character and intelligence. Didn't play within the defense and just did his own thing. Doesn't really understand the nuances of the game and is strictly a 3-technique in a 43 front. Fairley also gets a lot of flack for being a dirty player. Flagged numerous times for late hits and took a lot of cheap shots on quarterbacks, which I really don't mind to be quite honest. Plays with a nasty demeanor and finishes plays. Fairley is extremely gifted. He is long, very athletic and shows unlimited upside. The concerns are there though. Will he reach that potential? Thats the question teams are going to have to decide during the interview process. Came into the combine at just 291 pounds, and I rarely rank sub-300 pound defensive tackles in the Top 10. Glenn Dorsey was the only one, and he got a Top 5 grade from me. You'd like to see better size since his limbs are lanky and most of his weight is carried in his mid section. He may not have the ability to get much bigger. A great athlete, but there is a bit of risk involved. Incredible movement skills and plays with natural leverage and generates a lot of speed, explosiveness and power. If he falls, he could be a steal since he is a top 3 talent in this draft at a critical position. Work ethic will determine success. My draft grade proves I think he will lose focus once he gets his NFL contract.

Grade: Top 20




Cameron Heyward, DE, Ohio State, Sr.
http://img835.imageshack.us/img835/7353/haywerd.jpg (http://img835.imageshack.us/i/haywerd.jpg/)
Heyward isn't the most physically gifted defensive end you'll find, but he does posses very good athletic ability for his natural position of 34 defensive end. He lacks the speed and explosiveness to be an impact player as a 43 defensive end and is best suited for 34 fronts. As a 43 player, his value is not nearly as high, and carriers little potential to be anything more than a decent pro. Heyward is a very tough, physical linemen that has a great motor and the kind of character / work ethic that will maximize his potential. Haywerd has really good size and excellent arm length with some room to pack on even more weight to his frame. Very good athlete with an excellent basketball background. Very agile and quick for a big man. Carriers his weight well. With weight room conditioning at the NFL level, Heyward may bulk up to around 300 pounds. He plays with incredible leverage and excellent handwork. A natural bender that plays low. Has a great bullrush and plays with heavy hands. Heyward disengages from blockers well. He uses his long arms to keep good separation, and in one-on-one situations he has the ability to stack, shed and toss a defender out of the way. Shows the ability to anchor down and play two gaps, but has been pushed around by strong offensive linemen. Has a good push-pull technique. His size is very good, but his strength needs to improve as he does get engulfed by double teams. He will also lose ground on occasion and will play high at times (mostly when he tires). He is not extremely stout at the point of attack and does struggle with bigger, physical linemen. He's not dominate and never will be in any phase of the game, but he's a very smart football player that is always in the right position, works well in traffic and plays with great discipline and excellent technique. Not a ton of potential left, but he could develop into one of the better 34 defensive ends in the NFL. Maybe a bit of an overachiever, but he never quits on a play and he'll make tackles behind the line of scrimmage, at the line of scrimmage or ten and fifteen yards down field. The one thing that I hate the most is how far off the ball he will line up. Everyone else will be up on the ball, and Heyward will be off the ball, sometimes over a full yard. Lacks a burst off the snap. Brings a lot of versatility along the line at the college level, but is exclusively a 34 defensive end prospect. Tons of experience playing against interior linemen. Great team player, a lead with great character. Has very good instincts. Very good vision. Has a knack for finding the ball. Does a good job pushing the pocket and playing until the whistle. Consistently gives linemen a fight for 60 minutes.

Grade: Round 1



Jimmy Smith, CB, Colorado, Sr.
http://img806.imageshack.us/img806/4868/jimmysmith.jpg (http://img806.imageshack.us/i/jimmysmith.jpg/)
Smith is an outstanding press corner and one of the most impressive cover corners I have ever seen at the college level from a pure man coverage standpoint. Smith has incredible size, about 6'2'' and 210 pounds with very long arms. He is great at the line of scrimmage and does an excellent job redirecting receivers off the line and really disrupting patterns, making it difficult to run routes. He is extremely physical, sometimes too physical past five yards. With his hand use and his long arms, his smoothness, balance and patience in coverage, he looks eerily similar to... Nnamdi Asomugha. I can't believe I just compared a college corner to one of the most technically sound corners the game has ever seen, but that is exactly who he reminds me of when he plays up to his abilities. Smith lacks the complete game and the consistency of Asomugha, but his technique is very similar to go along with his freakish size and length. Smith has a great understanding of the game, but does not always use the patience Asomugha is most known for. In press coverage he will take a false step and jump inside on occasion, which causes him to get beat off the line. He does, however, show very good straight line speed and can make up ground when he's beat off the line. He can read routes in off coverage, jump routes and use his instincts and closing speed to break up passes. He does read the quarterbacks eyes when in off coverage and makes plays on the football, or quick stops (closes extremely well) for minimal gains. He can make the position look as effortless as I have ever seen. Smith has good quickness, but is a little tight in his hips and plays a little too high, which will make some question if he needs to play safety. He can quickly plant and drive off his back (plant) foot, explode out of his break and stay right in the hip pocket of receivers on some of the most difficult routes to defend. Smith needs to sure up his tackling and do a better job stopping the run. He tackles too high and will struggle at the next level with stronger backs. He has a relatively thin / lanky frame, but he is willing in run support and doesn't shy away from contact. Smith needs to play with more consistency and use his size better when it comes to the run. Smith's knocks are his inconsistent play and his, sometimes, overly physical jams, which lead to holding, illegal contact or pass interference penalties down field. He will get overaggressive or wild with his technique and grab instead of jam. The disconcerting thing about Smith is his lackadaisical attitude, immaturity and possibly being a "paycheck player." Smith has tons of potential and a lot of upside. He's one of the most gifted corners I have ever seen. Really unlimited upside. Could be a major steal on draft day, but you get the feeling that Smith is only going to be good as he wants to be. Some major red flags regarding character. With some of the interviews I've heard, he is a complete moron that's incredibly immature and needs to learn to grow up. Incredibly stupid and takes no responsibility for his actions. Failed drug tests during college career numerous times. Has an entourage that he follows and came from a bad upbringing. Not a leader. Will probably be a giant waste of talent. From a pure talent standpoint, I think Smith is the most gifted corner in this class. Yes, better than Peterson. Simply, he might not care.

Grade: Round 1

BigBanger
09-09-2010, 05:28 PM
Day 2 Players





Andy Dalton, QB, TCU, Sr.
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Dalton is one of the most experienced players in the draft. A 42-7 career record and three time Bowl game MVP, Dalton has seen years of success as he was the centerpiece in turning TCU into a national powerhouse. Finished his senior season with a 13-0 record and win over Wisconsin. Only average height and size (6'2'' and 215 pounds) and slightly above average arm strength. He really improved his game and became the best player in Mountain West Conference. Finished his senior season with a 66% completion percentage with 27 TDs and 6 INTs. Played in a spread system mostly out of the shotgun. Will have to learn to take NFL drop backs and adjust his footwork. Really smart with an incredibly high football I.Q. Really mastered the offensive scheme of TCU and was like another coach on the field during his senior season. He had more control of the offense than other quarterback in college football. He showed a phenomenal understanding of the nuances of the game. Phenomenal ability to make pre snap reads and made audibles. Incredibly smart and can master an NFL offense. Decisive with the football. Has great natural throwing mechanics. Stands tall in the pocket. Will stand tall in the face of pressure and step into a throw while staring down the gun barrel. Great poise. Hard worker that's incredibly focused. A winner. Dedicated to the game. Great leader with tons of confidence. Very coachable and showed improvement throughout his career. Great competitor with enough athletic ability to move around in the pocket and buy time. Excellent decision maker and understands check downs and ball security. Great understanding of critical game situations. Would run into trouble throwing into zone coverages. Would force throws and was a bit of a gunslinger at times. Threw into triple coverage at times and made some bad decisions with the football. Usually extremely smart with the football, but will get greedy at times. Incredibly accurate and shows phenomenal anticipation on his throws. Great ball placement on short to intermediate throws. Doesn't have a great deep ball, but it did improve throughout his career. Will have to improve strength and conditioning to improve deep ball and accuracy deep down the field. Best suited for west coast systems that utilize the short, quick passing game he was accustomed to while at TCU. Had the luxury of the short passing game and quick reads. Dalton has starting potential, but his ceiling is limited. Wont be an elite starting quarterback, but he has enough tools and talent to be a winner and the leader of an offense. Great field vision and knows where the ball should go. A lot better than people think and he could be a surprise player and utter steal if he slips into Round 2. He has everything you look for in a franchise quarterback but the cannon arm.

Grade: Fringe 1st Round



Mark Ingram, RB, Alabama, Jr.
http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/5117/markingram.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/210/markingram.jpg/)
Mark Ingram will go down as one of Alabama's greatest players. He holds the record for rushing yards in a single season when he won the Heisman trophy in 2009 (his true sophomore year). The first Heisman trophy winner in Alabama's illustrious program history. He was the workhorse that led them to a National Championship victory over Texas. A decorated college athlete with great college production. Ingram goes in to the NFL draft with mild skepticism. With that skepticism also comes gaudy comparisons to the NFLs all-time leading rusher, Emmitt Smith. They are very similar. Neither did anything flashy, both were complete players, neither had great size, both ran extremely hard, both were natural runners with great instincts and both maximized their natural abilities. He isn't a big guy, but he is well built and carriers his weight extremely well. He's very thick, especially in his lower body and those type of backs (Ray Rice, Maurice Jones-Drew, Frank Gore, Steven Jackson, DeAngelo Williams, Ricky Williams, Michael Turner, Pierre Thomas) are becoming more stable and durable than speed players with smaller, slighter frames (Reggie Bush, Chris Johnson, Jamaal Charles, Darren McFadden, Steve Slaton). Like Smith, he lacks elite qualities and isn't deemed a "special talent" such as Adrian Peterson or Darren McFadden. He is more in the Ray Rice category of running back prospects. He uses his vision, his patience and his burst through the hole to consistently gash defenses. He runs with great power, has a low center of gravity, drivers through defenders and breaks a lot of tackles. He is a physical running back and wears on defenses. He seems to get stronger and stronger throughout the game. His balance and his vision are what separates him from the average back. He doesn't have good top speed to run away from defenders and his size may prohibit him from constantly running defenders over, but he does show a nice ability to cut back against the grain. Ingram has just enough wiggle to make a man miss. He's a decisive runner that runs hard downhill and attacks opposing defenses. Always keeping his legs turning as he carries defenders and gains extra yardage. He has proven to be a hard back to bring down. Ingram also has that great body lean and always falls forward. Ingram is the total package and does a nice job catching the ball out of the backfield. He's a complete player with natural instincts for the position (something that "special talent" Darren McFadden didn't have). Hardly ever fumbles and plays big against the best competition. Ingram is a hard working player with excellent character. The more you watch him and the more you stop and think about it, the more you might convince yourself that he projects to be a fantastic NFL player. No, he doesn't have the great speed or the gaudy size and he has taken a lot of carriers already at the college level, but he fits the mold for some of the most successful running backs in the NFL right now. Mark Ingram is as close to a sure thing as it gets. You know exactly what kind of player you're getting. There will be no surprises, there are no concerns for not reaching potential. He can come in right away and immediately boost an offense. There is limited potential and, possibly, a shorter career. Already coming into the NFL with a lot of mileage on the tires and an injury plagued junior season.

Grade: Fringe 1st Round



Greg Little, WR, North Carolina, Sr.
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Little is one of the most talented prospects in this draft, but due to character concerns and a season long suspension, he will fall in the draft. Most likely a third to fifth round player, Little could wind up being the biggest steal come draft day. Little has Top 10 potential and incredible upside. More talented than Julio Jones and just as physically impressive. Little is a former running back and that style of physicality really shows in his run after the catch. North Carolina did everything they could to get the football in his hands. Great option for reverses, screens and having him come out of the backfield from time-to-time. A true playmaker in the mold of Hakeem Nicks where, when the ball is in his hands, he as dangerous as they come. Incredible stiff arm, great spin move and has enough wiggle to make guys miss in the open field. Little has really strong hands and makes some acrobatic catches. Great leaping ability and body control. Has a big body, 6'2'' 230, and does a great job shield defenders from the football. Has the natural instincts for the position. Solid speed and good athletic ability. Incredibly tough and extremely physical. Has enough top end speed to run vertical patterns successfully, but wont be a dynamic deep threat. Little is very raw and has little experience playing the position. And it shows up in the technical aspects of his game. North Carolina had to find ways to get him the ball, because he couldn't get open on a consistent basis. Only a marginal route runner that rounds routes off and will be easy to telegraph at the next level. He's a spaz on the field and tends to due stupid stuff like taunting, drop kicking football into the stands after a TD and other silly antics that show immaturity and a lack of class. Very competitive and seems to have a love a passion for the game. Needs to mature and treat the game as a profession. Needs focus and learn the definition of accountability, which probably wasn't enforced by Butch Davis. Could be a prima donna on and off the field. May cause some unwanted attention and subsequent headaches for a team. The sky is the limit with him. Could be a really productive player in the mold of Brandon Marshall, but may never be the kind of locker room presence that you want. A more talented player than Julio Jones with more upside. Just lacks the same level of maturity. Probably wont be playing for a winner.

Grade: Fringe 1st Round




Jake Locker, QB, Washington, Sr.
http://img823.imageshack.us/img823/7207/jakelockeruw.jpg (http://img823.imageshack.us/i/jakelockeruw.jpg/)
Jake Locker went into the Washington Huskers program as an athlete first and a quarterback second. He'll be entering the NFL groomed to be a pocket passer prepared for by an NFL style offense. Under Steve Sarkisian's tutelage for his junior and senior seasons, Locker has made tremendous strides with his mechanics and footwork, but still has a long way to go. Locker has shown, before coaches and GMs even talk to him, that he is extremely coachable and has the ability to apply what he has learned to the field. Locker is a very athletic player with great speed and quickness for the quarterback position. Locker has a very good arm and a solid release. Has good touch on his passes. When his footwork gets sloppy, or when he throws off his back foot, his accuracy is poor and the velocity on his throws lessens. Locker is surrounded by poor skill position players and a very inconsistent offensive line, which will give his diehard Locker fans some much needed excuses for disappointing play. Locker has become accustomed to staring down pressure, which has lead to him throwing off his back foot even when he has time in the pocket. With Locker's great potential and gaudy upside that has garnered John Elway comparisons, comes just as much potential for failure. Jake Locker is not John Elway and he's certainly not the best prospect since John Elway, or even remotely close. For how much Locker has shown to improve since a freshman to senior season has been a significant improvement, but rest assured, he has a long, long way to go to be the passer some have made him out to be. Locker has had unrealistic expectations bestowed upon him and with a supporting cast that is quite terrible, any kind of blip on the radar will have people running from the bandwagon. Going 4-20 against Washington with 2 INTs did just that. Much debate was made about the game and then a series of blame game tactics were used to uphold Locker to his already, exceedingly unreal status. Some blamed everyone but Locker, some blamed Locker and Locker alone. Locker has become a polarizing player. His top notch intangibles, great work ethic and physical talent are enough for some to call a franchise quarterback. Locker does have first round potential, but he does not have elite potential. Never has shown that kind of ability. He simply has not shown an ability to look off defenders, make adequate progressions, proper decision making, poise in the pocket or even the ability to throw from in the pocket adequately. Locker is really good when's on the move and outside the pocket. His struggles come from inside the pocket, especially when he faces pressure. He is also very athletic and can avoid pass rushers, keep plays alive. He is susceptible to forcing a lot of throws and making some very bad decisions when under pressure. From his junior season to his senior season, Locker had no growth under the tutelage of Sarkisian. Locker is coming into the NFL with a lot flaws and a lot of ability. One week he may look like John Elway, but the next week he could look like Rob Johnson. The inconsistent production does hurt him and makes him a bit of an enigma at one of the toughest positions to scout. Would I be surprised to see Locker fail miserably? No, not at all. Would I be surprised to see him turn into one of the elite QBs in the NFL after 4 years of playing? Yeah, kinda, because I don't think he has the kind of potential to be a 4,000 yard passer with a high completion percentage and a 2:1 TD to INT ratio. Locker's inability to be decisive with the football and have timing with his receivers is an underestimated quality for a young quarterback, which he has not shown. Locker throws it when he sees it opens up and doesn't anticipate the play being open. Locker simply needs more experience in a pro style system. He is still new to it and he's not accustomed to making the kind of reads he's asked to make. Locker needs to improve on his anticipation and his footwork. When he steps into his throw or when he's on the move, he is very accurate and a very good passer. When he throws off his back foot or doesn't step into his throw, or when he rushes his throw is he can make bad decisions and throw an inaccurate ball. He has a lot of potential to both succeed and fail. He's a risky player. Depending on how much teams are willing to risk will determine how high of draft pick Locker is. Locker has failed to live up to the hype, or even come close to it, which has seen a drop in his draft stock from golden boy and eventual #1 overall pick to possibly not even seeing the first round. Locker may have the great intangibles and the top notch work ethic, but he just doesn't seem to be a great passer from inside the pocket. Mid 50s completion percentage in college is a major concern. Instincts for the position are questionable.

Grade: Round 2



Gabe Carimi, OT, Wisconsin, Sr.
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Carimi is a mammoth offensive tackle prospect standing at 6'7'' and 315 pounds. Long arms and uses them well for his punch. Decent athletic ability and decent footwork. An experienced linemen with four years of experience against top end talent. Replaced Joe Thomas and Wisconsin hardly missed a beat. A tough competitor who has battled through injuries. Does a really good job in the running game and could be an excellent in-line blocker with improved technique. A hard working player and a leader along the line. Good technique and is NFL ready. Excellent hand placement and a good punch. A complete tackle, but will be best suited as a right tackle. Lacks the athletic to play left tackle, where he played during college. Really struggles with speed and tends to play high, which causes a slew of technical issues. Will allow defenders to punch him (loses leverage at times) and knock him off balance. Will get walked back to the quarterback. Doesn't sustain blocks in the running game. Would drive a defender off the ball, but he's a leaner who tends to fall on his face after a great initial punch. Needs to keep his head up and play with better knee bend. Speed and athletic defensive ends exposed his limits as a pass protector. Consistently had to reach and grab due to poor kick step and slow feet. A right tackle only. Plays with a bit of a nasty attitude that will finish off plays. Will probably develop into a marginal starter for a team in need of a right tackle. Could be a solid starter for the next ten years. Will get beat and wont always finish off blocks in the running game. Really does compete and has an excellent motor. Has a great understanding of blocking schemes. High football IQ and understands positioning and angles.

Grade: Round 2



Adrian Clayborn, DE, Iowa, Sr.
http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/5484/adrianclayborn.jpg (http://img217.imageshack.us/i/adrianclayborn.jpg/)
Adrian Clayborn was the defensive player of the year in 2009. With a breakout junior campaign, Clayborn notched 20 tackles for loss and 11.5 sacks. He became one of the most complete defensive ends in the entire country and became a household name after a dominating Orange Bowl victory over Georgia Tech when he won the games MVP honors. Clayborn has good size, 6'2'' and 280 pounds, is very strong and holds the point of attack well against the run. He shows an excellent propensity to stack and shed defenders, plays with good leverage, takes excellent angles to get around players and closes to the ball carrier. Has a really good push-pull technique and threw linemen around at times. With a solid variety of pass rush moves, he's a player that uses his hands well, but is inconsistent with his handwork. They are very active though. I think Clayborn projects extremely well to a left defensive end position in a 43 front. He lacks the elite burst and explosiveness to play on the right side and wont be a sack artist at the next level. Clayborn is an incredibly physical player that shows a good motor. He does, however, seem to wear down during games and stamina seems to be an issue. He will have sporadic play and lose his quickness and speed at times due to fatigue. Solid technique and a powerful lower half. Very good feet and great balance. Strong anchor. Clayborn has very few flaws in his game, but the one's he does have are some major concerns that could greatly effect his chance to be an above average NFL player. One thing he has going against him, and this is a big concern for me, is a medical condition that he was born with. Clayborn was born with Erb's palsy in his right upper arm, which is a paralysis of the arm that can prevent range of motion, lack of strength and loss of feeling. He has battled this condition throughout his life and has gone through therapy during his childhood. I always noticed something odd about Clayborn's hands, and when I first heard the story, it brought up concerns. Sometimes it seemed like he was playing with one good arm, as I would see him attempt numerous one armed tackles that he was in position to wrap up with both arms. This is something that teams will look into. If they think it will effect his play, and I think it will, then Clayborn could see an unexpected drop in his draft stock. I don't think it effects his play too much at the college level, but it could have a bigger impact at the next level than most people expect. Sometimes one arm will be more active than the other. If this is the case, then he will probably have to kick over to the right side, the position he plays now, since his left hand appears to be his dominate hand and the more active arm. This makes me question if his technique will see any further improvements. Has he reached his max potential? After a down senior season where he only recorded 3.5 sacks, one has to question if Clayborn can improve. Adrian Clayborn, nevertheless, is a fantastic college player and a solid pro prospect. He looks very good in space for a guy his size and does an excellent job tracking the ball and taking great angles in pursuit. Very strong, plays great team defense and is a very disciplined player. He's a nasty player that knows how to finish a play and has delivered some bone crushing hits on QBs. He is a stud that shows excellent instincts and aggressiveness. Very good quickness and subtly. Linemen with great length and a good punch will give him a lot of trouble at the next level. At times I questioned if he was dominating on pure talent and power. Limited upside and medical could prevent him from being that elite starting end people are expecting of him.

Grade: Round 2



Akeem Ayers, LB, UCLA, Jr.
http://img31.imageshack.us/img31/978/ayers.jpg (http://img31.imageshack.us/i/ayers.jpg/)
Akeem Ayers is going to be one of the most intriguing and versatile players in the upcoming draft. With exceptional size for an outside linebacker in a traditional 43 front and outstanding athletic ability, Ayers, at times, looks the part of a traditional undersized, speed rusher. With long arms, which helps him stack and shed defenders greatly, and an excellent burst, Ayers shows great potential as a rush backer in a 34 defense. UCLA runs a bland 43 base defense for the most part, but they do allow Ayers to stick his hand in the dirt, pin his ears back and rush the passer in their "Joker" packages. With incredible athleticism and great speed, Ayers is hard to handle for college linemen while rushing the passer. He's just too fast and too athletic. Ayers shows his physicality when he uses his bullrush in pass rush situations and gains great leverage on opposing linemen, knocking them back on their heels. Then the next play he can drop back into coverage and show how fluid and comfortable he is moving backwards or side-to-side. Ayers has been underused in UCLAs defense thus far. A talent like him with that kind of versatility should be used all over the field, and he should rush the passer more often than he does. He's a big time playmaker for the Bruins defense and should be used as a more dynamic player in the NFL to maximize his talents. Ayers biggest draw backs are his inexperience and rawness, even for the standard 43 OLB position. His inconsistency and his lack of plays made behind the line of scrimmage are concerns. Ayers doesn't seem to trust his eyes. Either that or he has below average instincts. He doesn't hit the hole or make the stop for a loss. Instead he tap dances and waits for the back to come to him. He lacks that natural, down hill aggressive style of play. While in space, he takes bad angles to the ball carrier and will often times over pursue the play and give the back an opportunity to cut back on him, sometimes resulting in a missed tackle. He does miss too many tackles or dives and makes one arm stops. He, like a lot of Bruin defenders, needs to do a better job breaking down, especially in space, and making a technically sound tackles. Once Ayers continues developing, both physically and mentally, he can perform at a high level and be a very intriguing toy for defensive minded coaches. There have been some great linebackers drafted in the first round in recent years and I believe Ayers is as talented as any linebacker there has been in the past 5 years. I think Ayers potential is through the roof. I like him best as an inside linebacker in a 34 front, but he should give a team another pass rusher from the outside and potentially finish out his career there. He shows great potential to be a true 34 weak side backer. He has an explosive first step, natural hand use and he's more than athletic enough to dip his shoulder and run the arc. He's also much quicker side-to-side than most pass rushers. Ayers has the total package from a talent standpoint. He is very raw, but when scouts put on the game tape and see him the Joker packages for UCLA, they will see the best pass rusher the Bruins have, and one with major upside. He's not stout at the point of attack and will struggle as a run defender. He doesn't take blockers on, and instead tries to run around them, which does open up holes because lacks gap assignment. My big draw back, and what keeps me from calling him a top 10 player, are his lack of instincts, missed tackles, questionable toughness and lack of physicality. Ayers is one talented player, but toughness and run defense are major concerns. He's very raw with a ton of potential. May not have a true position and lacks a good motor. Also seems to quit on plays, and at times looked disinterested. Is going to give good effort on a bad team?

Grade: Round 2



Ricky Stanzi, QB, Iowa, Sr.
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Stanzi is one of my favorite college quarterbacks and one of my favorite players. One of the best leaders in this Daft class from the quarterback position and a true winner with a lot of experience in the Big 10. A winner that consistently put his team in favorable positions. Infectious personality and easy going. Terrific size and a solid arm with adequate strength and power. Can develop more velocity on his throws as he continues to get bigger and improve his strength. Throws very well on the run and had much improved accuracy during his senior season. Became "The Guy" during his senior season instead of the game manager during his junior season. Still has a lot of upside and potential and tends to get overlooked. Great ability to slid in the pocket, reset his feet and deliver and accurate throw. Very fluid hips. Can pump fake to one side of the field, flip his hips to the other side and get rid of the ball quickly and accurately. Very good base and excellent footwork. Coming from an NFL scheme. Made NFL reads and NFL throws. Extremely smart with a high football IQ. Shows the ability to go through progressions and read the entire field, but inconsistent in that regard. Tremendous mechanics. Stands tall in the pocket and will step into throws in the face of pressure. Can escape a pass rush, buy time, move out of the pocket and keep his eyes down field. Throws very well on the run. Excellent play action. Accurate at every level with short, intermediate and deep throws. Will tend to lock onto one side of the field. Doesn't always come off his first or second option. Held onto the ball too long at times and took too many sacks. Won the 2011 Insight Bowl where he matched up against Blaine Gabbert and the Missouri Tigers. That game showed that he has does not possess the same kind of physical tools as Gabbert and lacks the power and velocity on this throws to warrant a high draft pick. Tends to loft deep balls and puts too much air on his passes. Throws touch passes and lacks the fastball on throws 15-20 yards downfield. Needs to develop more torque with his hips on throws and garner more velocity. Tremendous upside, but an average arm that many people will downgrade and will be pushed to the middle rounds. Could be a huge steal and has potential to be a starter. If he continues to develop, and if arm continues to improve, he could be a major steal in the same vein of Matt Schaub, Tom Brady and Aaron Rodgers -- other QBs that fell due to average strength, but developed powerful arms in the pro's. Tremendous leader and very smart. Really progressed and made tremendous strides.

Grade: Round 2



Jonathan Baldwin, WR, Pittsburgh, Jr.
http://img202.imageshack.us/img202/6554/baldwin.jpg (http://img202.imageshack.us/i/baldwin.jpg/)
Baldwin is a highlight reel waiting to happen. Easily one of the most exciting skill players in all of college football and a prospect that will have scouts buzzing. I think most of the buzz wont be over his ridiculous vertical jump or his insane acrobatic catches, but weather or not he can separate from NFL corners. Coaches, GMs and scouts seem to go gaga every time they see a 6'5" inch player run down the field pick balls out of the air and make corners look like little kids. That's exactly what Baldwin does. He looks like a man amongst boys. He is simply too big, too strong and too athletic for college cornerbacks to contend with on vertical passes deep down the field. I wont deny his ability to track the ball and adjust to it, time his jump while the ball is in the air and show the great, strong hands to haul it in. The thing is, jump balls in college, against cornerbacks that wont play in the pros, are far more frequent at the college level and in video games. Every time you see a player this big, you have to stop and evaluate his quickness, his ability to separate and his route running. That is usually not shown in highlight reels. Everyone went crazy over James Hardy a few years ago and people are still waiting on guys like Jerome Simpson and Ramses Barden. Some thought Danario Alexander was the next Randy Moss. Sorry to say, but not even Calvin Johnson was the next Randy Moss. Baldwin shows similarities with those disappointments and the similarities are in their weaknesses. It is very hard for Baldwin to come out of his breaks with good speed and gain separation. He cannot run short patterns such as quick slants, out routes or jerk routes. He just doesn't have the stop-and-start ability or the agility to do so. He might run a good time at the combine, but that's straight line speed and that is not my big concern. And even his straight line speed doesn't seem to be anything special. We do know he can get deep, but even then Baldwin fails to show the ability to separate. And this is at the college level. Have you ever seen him just pull away from someone? Break their ankles and leave them in their tracks with a great juke? Just run a route so clean and so smooth that he separates with ease? Like a Santonio Holmes? A Chad Johnson? A Reggie Wayne? A Steve Smith? Michael Crabtree? A Roddy White? Or even a Derrick Mason? Baldwin, like a lot of these guys that stand over 6'3'' tend to have a very high center of gravity. He runs routes high and loses a lot of speed and quickness in and out of his breaks. His size may prohibit him from becoming a good route runner, which means he has little potential to improve. Baldwin is a very raw prospect with a limited route tree, and I think he is a far superior talent to the big, slow players that I mentioned here, but if he does succeed, it will be a rarity and the exception to the rule. Baldwin runs three routes. The 9 route, the hitch and the in-route. That's it. I'm not sure he has any potential to run any more than that since he is so limited with his lack of quickness, elusiveness and inability to come out of routes without losing speed. The NFL is changing to a smaller, quicker, faster man's game. I'm not sure this type of wide receiver is in vogue anymore. The bigger receivers in the league? Randy Moss, Calvin Johnson, Malcolm Floyd and Vincent Jackson. Those guys all have very good speed, but they all show very good quickness and suddenness. I'm not sure Baldwin can't succeed in the NFL, especially in the Chargers scheme where all those vertical routes would be best suited for him, but there is no denying the kid has a lot of talent. Baldwin has some really great hands, phenomenal ball skills and some real game breaking ability. One of my favorite college players in the game, but he's in for an up hill battle to succeed at the next level. With his incredible vertical and ball skills, maybe Jonathan Baldwin is the exception to the rule. There are a lot of question marks surrounding Baldwin.


Grade: Round 2



Ryan Mallet, QB, Arkansas, Sr.
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Mallet has the elite arm strength that scouts drool over and his 6'7'' frame gives him more than enough size, but maybe too much, to be an elite quarterback prospect. I feel his gaudy size is a major negative as he's so immobile that he really struggles to move in the pocket, avoid a rush, and then keep his footing and deliver an accurate ball down field. Once he gets pressure, he's forced into some bad decisions, forced throws and a significant decline in his already spotty accuracy. He really doesn't know how to take something off on short slants or throws underneath, and makes for a very difficult ball to catch on short passes. His accuracy and ball placement are also inconsistent, but mostly having to do with poor and inconsistent footwork / throwing mechanics. Mallett is very accurate when he has proper throwing mechanics and a good base. His vision and field awareness are areas that need to improve as he will lock onto a target and try to force passes into windows that aren't there. Also runs into issues with not seeing blitzers and really struggles with protection calls. Mallet really struggles when the play breaks down and the line collapses. He is a statute back there and needs everything to unfold perfectly for a play to work out, which simply wont happen in the NFL. Struggles resetting his feet to find a throwing lane and then delivering an accurate pass. When Mallet has time to drop back, set his feet and sling it, he can make it look as good as they come. An absolute cannon who can put the ball on the money when his mechanics and footwork are in proper working order. Incredible deep ball with tremendous accuracy and ball placement. As good as I've ever seen with vertical throws. He throws a lot of his passes off balanced, without his shoulders square and with all arm. His throwing mechanics tend to break down frequently. Mallet is a very raw prospect that is a bigger developmental project than most realize because of his poor pocket mobility and ability to recognize the blitz. He has a stigma for being the most NFL ready quarterback since he's coming from a pro style offense, but he will struggle adapting to the blitz. He seems to have put in little time and effort to become mechanically sound, which makes me question his work ethic. I have not seen much progression from one year to the next with Mallet. He's in a quarterback friendly scheme that saw many receiving options running wide open on a routine basis. Inflated production, but is coming from an NFL system with NFL reads. Extremely high football IQ that tends to get overlooked due to rumors and allegations of drug abuse. Mallett has some concerns regarding off field issues such as drugs and alcohol use and some say he thinks he's Eminem. His maturity seems to be highly questionable. Mallett's concerns on the field don't warrant the hype he has gotten, as he plays more like a second rounder with some serious holes in his game, but his character concerns, decision making, flawed / inconsistent mechanics / footwork and overall leadership qualities are something that he may simply lack. I felt that Mallett appeared to be a leader that everyone rallied around while at the Combine, but where there's smoke, there's fire. Mallett is a risk if you draft him high, but he could develop into a starting quarterback. Rare physical tools, but some major concerns moving and sliding in the pocket. Too many concerns about what type of man he is. Arrogant? Immature? Coachable? Accountable? You'd rather not have these questions, but he does. I think Mallett will be decent with an offensive line that is exceptional. If he goes to a team that struggles to protect the quarterback, then he could be in for some serious struggles and have a bad TD:INT ratio. Doesn't make players around him better, but could be like a Kurt Warner where if everything is perfect, he could put up some big numbers. If it's not perfect, he could be abysmal and be a second stringer. He has to go to the right team, or most importantly, the right offensive line. Really struggled in college when defenses rushed him. Reason why he was incredibly streaky. Starting potential, but very limited upside. Showed a lack of improvement during his college career and is basically the same player that he was going into Arkansas as he is coming out.

Grade: Round 3



Cam Newton, QB, Auburn, Sr.
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Cam Newton will be one of the most talked about prospects in the 2011 daft. The Heisman winning quarterback on the National Championship Tigers has as much talk about his off field issues as his on field performance, which will have scouts and teams all over the board on his value. Newton is a physically imposing talent with great size (6'5'' 250), excellent strength and power to elude pass rushers. A great presence in the pocket and feels the rush. Calm under pressure and doesn't make mistake. Moves well out of the pocket and throws his best when on the run. Newton has one of the strongest arms in this class and generates a lot of power behind his passes. A good, hard runner in the same vein as Tim Tebow. Ran for over 1,400 yards and 20+ rushing TDs his last season. Decent accuracy, but footwork causes for missed throws that he's capable of making. Excellent throwing motion that's over-the-top. Has one loss as a starter over two in college. A winner. A tough player that made plays in the clutch, just not in a traditional manner. For as many great things as Newton brings to the table physically, he has as many concerns that follow right behind. Newton is a supremely talented athlete. He has great production, but it was for just one year. Newton strikes me as a "me guy" surrounded by a bad group of people, that have gotten him into nothing but more trouble off the field during the entire draft process. From his history of stealing a computer and then trying to cover it up, to cheating on tests, dropping out of Florida before getting kicked out and then taking a lot of money to attend Auburn, Newton had his name in the papers for all wrong reasons - even during his National Championship run where he handled the scrutiny extremely well. Words like "self-entitled," "phony" and "narcissist" describing his personality aren't the best things floating around. Then you see him in interviews and he's incredibly fake giving scripted answers. Why is he hiding the real Cam Newton? Cheating on tests bring up serious concerns about work ethic regarding the mental aspect of the game, not to mention maturity, which he obviously lacks. Is he going to be taking shortcuts? Is he going to be the first one in and the last one out? Is he mature enough to be a professional? Is he going to sit in the film room for hours on end learning defensive schemes? Mastering an NFL offense? That's Newton's biggest hurdle: Working and transition to the NFL level, realizing that you can't rely solely on talent, which is what he did in college. Newton is coming from a college system that is about as far away from an NFL system as the college game gets. He mostly made two reads (high to low and to one side of the field), stared down receiving targets and did most of his damage with his legs, or on play action fakes. His running is not Michael Vick. He doesn't have the same speed and explosiveness that Vick had, which was the only truly successful run-first quarterback. He's not very accurate with the football and missed some wide open targets on occasion. Ball placement is spotty. Newton is going to have a big jump when transitioning to the next level. He is going to have to put in a lot of time adjusting to the NFL passing game. Very inexperience reading defenses and throwing the football with anticipation and timing. Even stated that he underestimated the timing aspect of playing quarterback at the NFL Combine. Waits for a receiver to become open before delivering the ball, and fails to put the ball into tight windows (mostly due to scheme as receivers were running wide open quite frequently). Newton does have excellent pocket awareness, can avoid pass rushers and scramble for yards, but when he feels pressure he doesn't keep his eyes down field, instead looking to pick up yardage with his legs. Very strong and powerful, tough to take down in the pocket or outside of it. Can improvise and make something out of nothing. Newton got by at the college level on pure talent and a gimmick offense conducive for the college game, which exploited his best traits. That will not work at the next level. Newton is a major risk if taken high in the draft. He is little more than a roll of the dice. He could be a major bust, or he could develop into a quarterback capable of effectively throwing the football. Newton is a project who is more than just a year away. He's such a huge projection that there really is no telling if Newton will develop or not. With this much doubt and this many red flags regarding character, you can't really justify taking a leader of your franchise high in the first round, especially 1st overall. A lot of upside, but needs to be brought along slowly. Has an uphill battle against history as this type of quarterback has not been a successful transition for college players. I think he will disappoint a team that takes him in the top 10 overall.

Grade: Round 3



Da'Quan Bowers, DE, Clemson, Sr.
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Da'Quan Bowers scares the hell out of me. That's the first thing I'll say and this is why: He has the size, the athleticism, the burst, the explosiveness and the body frame of the franchise defensive end many believe him to be. Bowers is viewed as a potential #1 pick in the 2011 NFL Draft, and he's coming off a statistically dominating senior season. Couple that elite production with his measurables and potential, you can see why he's viewed as the best prospect in this years draft on some accounts. Bowers hardly ever flashes the ability of a Top 5 caliber player in my eyes. I see a guy that consistently got by just on pure talent and ability. I see very little technique and almost no ability to shed defenders, especially against the run where tight ends engage him and stick to him. Bowers is very raw, and after three years of disappointing to bad production, I wonder what took so long to finally produce. He seems to have a decent motor, but his play is inconsistent. He seems to be able to play the run well, but is inconsistent against it. He seems to be able to rush the passer, but is inconsistent with applying pressure. Sometimes Bowers will explode off the line of scrimmage. He has shown the ability to run around opposing tackles or play low, gain terrific leverage, and toss them aside for a sack. Other times he doesn't explode off the line and looks slow, and is then stalemated against inferior tackles. Bowers play is way too inconsistent for my liking. Combine that with being a huge disappointment for three years and I wonder why this talented kid took so long to produce at the college level. I'm a firm believer that if it takes you several years to produce at the college level, then it will take you several years to produce at the NFL level. I think it will take a couple years for Bowers to become acclimated to the NFL, but I don't know what will happen after that. Will he be an All-Pro? He has that kind of potential, but his lack of technique doesn't make me think that will happen. Will he be a bust? I think he could be if taken in the Top 5. Will he be a serviceable player that can contribute to a defensive rotation? I think that's more of the player you're getting with the hope that his talent pans out into a franchise end. He has versatility and can kick inside on passing downs to utilize his speed against guards. The potential is there, but the one year wonder has me proceeding with extreme caution. Going into his senior season he was a Michael Johnson type disappointment that looked like a Top 10 player, but constantly played like a 3rd or 4th rounder.

Grade: Round 3



Allen Bailey, DL, Miami (FL), Sr.
http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/3748/allenbailey.jpg (http://img121.imageshack.us/i/allenbailey.jpg/)
Allen Bailey started his college career in Miami as a linebacker. Since then he has been bouncing back-and-forth from defensive end to defensive tackle. And like the Hurricanes, I'm not sure what Bailey's true position is, or if he even has one. Bailey is a freak when it comes to the weight room. He's a rare physical specimen. Bailey is probably the most physically impressive prospect since Brian Orakpo. But the weight room doesn't always translate to being a great football player. Possessing great strength and power, Bailey relies solely on his ability to over power opposing defenders at the college level. A very, very raw player that gets by on his brute strength and his brute strength alone. Bailey has a bullrush move, another bullrush move and then one more bullrush move to add to his bullrush move. Bailey is a long armed defender that does use the bullrush to dominating effectiveness, but its at the college level. Bailey does play with great leverage and excellent leg drive. He does a great job playing on the other side of the ball and does a great job relocating the line of scrimmage. Great motor and continuously pushes the pocket. The thing Bailey lacks are those natural instincts for the position. He is usually the last defender off the ball and lacks a good burst off the line of scrimmage. Bailey is usually praised for his size and speed combination, but at the next level, his lack of explosiveness to keep opposing tackles honest will probably prohibit most 43 defenses from drafting him as a DE. His 275 pound frame, that appears to be maxed out, will concern 43 defenses when drafting him as a defensive tackle. Bailey is a very raw prospect that translates best to a 34 defensive end position. He has solid athletic ability. Bailey has a lot of potential, but if teams become enamored with his size and strength, they could draft him higher than he's worth. A big project. There are a lot of question marks for Bailey. You know exactly what you are getting, but you don't know if you're going to get a player that ever improves. Is he coachable? Does he have potential? Will he ever improve? He only has potential if he improves his technique, and that is something he has not done since he's been in college. He either has a lot of potential, or he has none. His inability to improve throughout the course of his college career is very disconcerting. Allen Bailey is a typical boom or bust type prospect. I think Bailey is a starting caliber 34 defensive end prospect, but I don't ever see him turning into a dominating player at the next level. I see him having a long career, but nothing noteworthy. His lack of set up moves and his inability to shed blockers will hinder him throughout his career if he does not become a more versatile or unpredictable player. A one trick pony that will be an easy, predictable matchup for NFL linemen. Probably a solid contributor and possibly a swing defensive end that could start for a team in a pinch and be effective.

Grade: Late Round 3

BigBanger
09-09-2010, 05:29 PM
Day 3 Players




Nate Solder, OT, Colorado, Sr.
http://img202.imageshack.us/img202/5531/natesolder.jpg (http://img202.imageshack.us/i/natesolder.jpg/)
Solder is a mammoth man that stands well over 6'7'' and might be a legit 6'8''. Like 6'6'' wide receivers, everyone seems to drool over their size. Solder has incredible size and extremely long arms. Overly large size comes deficiencies in other areas. It usually effects quickness and agility. Solder has a lot of ability and actually shows some very impressive speed, that you can actually see on the field. The problem is, you usually see it when he's chasing down a defensive end that blew by him. He has a great motor and shows a lot of effort and will finish off every single play. He also plays with an attitude and shows great competitiveness. He has very nimble feet and some very impressive athletic ability. He does a great job moving in space and getting to the second level or pulling on trap runs. There are a lot of things to like with Solder's physical abilities. He is, however, wildly inconsistent in pass protection whereas run blocking is his strength at this point. A lot of his hype is based solely on his measurables coupled with his exceptional athletic ability. But like Bruce Campbell last year, it takes more than elite size and great speed to be a top tier offensive tackle prospect. Campbell was a terrible player in college. Played like a seventh rounder, but because of his size and athletic ability, he garnered a lot of attention and a ton of first round hype. Solder is in that same category. He's a more advanced version of Campbell from a technique standpoint, but not nearly as athletic and wont be the same kind of workout warrior Campbell was (especially in the strength department). He does, however, continuously disappoint on game day, which is similar to Campbell. Solder's technique is problematic. Due to his size, he has to exaggerate his knee bend and attempt to get low than shorter tackles do (to make up for his long legs and tall center of gravity). He will put so much attention on staying low, that his feet don't move as well and he will struggle, at times, to move laterally. He tries to get low because he is very susceptible to losing leverage and getting knocked off balance. Solder's size actually prohibits him from playing with sound technique and good leverage. Solder ends up losing his balance quite often, not moving his feet as quickly as he can and bending at the waist, dropping his head and then looking awful. This happens far too often. When Solder does keep his head up and plays upright, then he loses his athletic ability and ends moving slowly and really struggles to keep up with quick twitch players. Another issue with Solder is his weak inside post leg. His weight is not always balanced and if a linemen swats his hands away, he will fall off balance and give a defender an opening for an inside move. Solder relies heavily on his arm length and upper body at the college level. His length greatly disrupts a pass rusher, but needs to be more consistent with his punch (sometimes doesn't even get his hands up). Solder competes in the running game. An extremely talented kid, but really struggles with leverage and balance at times. Extremely inconsistent and really struggled with speed. Solder does have a lot of potential, and when he's playing with good technique and leverage, he looks like a first rounder, but when he's not he looks absolutely awful. I don't think his issues are correctable because his height is what prevents him from playing with proper technique and leverage. There are a lot of things that Solder brings to the table that I love to see in an offensive linemen (athletic, long, hustles, nasty attitude), but I don't see him having a successful NFL career as a starting left tackle. He may have to kick over to the right side where he will be a developmental project. Very smart kind with top notch intangibles.

Grade: Round 4




Marvin Austin, DT, North Carolina, Sr.
http://img180.imageshack.us/img180/7039/austinl.jpg (http://img180.imageshack.us/i/austinl.jpg/)
Austin has NFL size and a lot of hype coming out of High School. Austin was one of the prize recruits for the North Carolina Tar Heels turn around under Butch Davis, which has lead to one of the most talent laden defenses in all of college football. Austin ran into problems off the field with suspensions and has shown a lot of immaturity during his senior year. Making tweets that show a lack of maturity and accountability. Acts as if his school is to blame for him taking money from agents. On the field, Austin has been a failure and a major disappointment. Failing to live up to the hype and putting up pedestrian numbers has yet to diminish his hype as a potential first round pick. Many still consider him a first round player. Austin's play alone will not get him drafted in the first 3 rounds. His problems off the field combined with poor play should make him a late round prospect. Marvin Austin is supposed to be an athletic defensive linemen that creates havoc in the backfield. He's not really anything more than a space eater with good strength and decent athleticism. He does show good hustle. Will usually finish off a play, or chase down a play (even if it's 10 yards down field). Austin's biggest problems are being big, slow and playing too high. He struggles in college, against college linemen, to push the pocket and play on the other side of the ball. He routinely loses leverage battles, gets pushed down the field, down the line or pancaked to the ground. It's almost as if he were on skates. He shows poor balance and spends a lot of the time on the ground. Austin is very raw and uses little technique. He struggles mightily to disengage from blockers. Austin, when double teamed, shows no technique, is overwhelmed and usually ends 5 to 10 yards down field. Austin really lacks that phone booth quickness or the ability to play with outside leverage and anchor ability. Austin has been living off High School hype and has not shown much progression during his college career. Work ethic? Coachable? That immediately comes into question for a guy that never shows improvement. Austin is an average college player. He's, at best, a backup player in the NFL. Character concerns and work ethic are definite question marks. Not a smart player on or off the field. I would have little desire to draft an underachiever with little potential and huge character concerns. He's been a major disappointment. Without the hype, he would be seen as an average player. He even fails to show off his talents, which have gotten him praise in the first place. He does show good, natural strength, but he does not know how to use. Will really enjoy the notoriety and party scene that could come with being a millionaire NFL player. No focus and desire to be a great player.

Grade: Round 7

JHL6719
09-09-2010, 09:49 PM
These are EASILY the best scouting reports you'll see anywhere on these players.

Kudos to you sir.... brilliant.

Day One Pick
09-10-2010, 05:13 AM
Baldwin has 4.4 speed. Long strider like Calvin Johnson who ran a 4.35 if memory serves me correctly. My biggest problem, really my only problem with Baldwin is he's a little uncoordinated and pretty raw as a route runner. Poor man's Calvin Johnson. Top 20 pick.

wicket
09-10-2010, 05:16 AM
a couple of points about baldwin. He could be the quickest guy out of the 'top 4' and id be suprised if the ran worse tha 4.55. On top of that there are plenty of slower tall wideouts in the league, first and foremost Marques Colston.

AntoinCD
09-10-2010, 05:36 AM
Baldwin's 40 time and long speed are both perfectly acceptible however I do agree he may have some trouble getting in and out of his breaks. He doesn't run clean routes but in the right scenario he will be a beast

BigBanger
09-10-2010, 07:00 AM
Baldwin has 4.4 speed. Long strider like Calvin Johnson who ran a 4.35 if memory serves me correctly. My biggest problem, really my only problem with Baldwin is he's a little uncoordinated and pretty raw as a route runner. Poor man's Calvin Johnson. Top 20 pick.

Baldwin's 40 time and long speed are both perfectly acceptible however I do agree he may have some trouble getting in and out of his breaks. He doesn't run clean routes but in the right scenario he will be a beast

a couple of points about baldwin. He could be the quickest guy out of the 'top 4' and id be suprised if the ran worse tha 4.55. On top of that there are plenty of slower tall wideouts in the league, first and foremost Marques Colston.
I figured this guy might be a topic of discussion, but once I got past the highlight reel catches (with pretty much all of the "Big 4"), you are left with some major concerns with all of them (except for AJ Green). I don't doubt Baldwins top end speed and I actually think it's good enough, I question his explosiveness off the line and his ability to run more than 2 routes. I questioned Dez Bryant's speed throughout the year last year, but I thought he could run a lot of routes and get open underneath and work the intermediate zones. I eventually, very late in the process, just went with my gut, forgot about 40 times, and trusted what I saw. I saw a beast in college. With Baldwin, I don't see half the player Bryant was. Bryant was a legit top 5 caliber player that did a lot of things other than just run down field and try to win a jump ball. With the eye ball test, Baldwin does not show enough to be a first rounder. He reminds me of a more talented James Hardy. I think in certain schemes and with certain offenses, he can see success. He is not a #1 WR though. I would not be surprised to see 3 of the "Big 4" turn into busts.

The only WR I have seen even close to Bryant from this class is AJ Green - who I really like and consider a top 10 player (possibly top 5 if I see improvements). He is much quicker than Baldwin. All these other guys have to show me something. Baldwin has to show me that he can run more than a couple routes and show me that he has the quickness to work the underneath portion of the field (or even the middle of the field, which is something I did not mention in my report). Judging from the Utah game, that doesn't look promising. That is the main reason why I am doing this report now: He has not shown any improvements since last year. He's pretty much the same player.

Also, Marques Colston is a completely different player than Baldwin. Different body types as well. Colston is a tough, physical guy that works the middle of the field and the perimeter. He's also a very good route runner in a wide open scheme (with one of the best QBs in the game). He has good quickness, but he uses his body and positioning extremely well. He's a natural receiver. Baldwin is very far from that (I'm putting that in the nicest of words). He plays nothing like Brandon Marshall or Larry Fitzgerald either. Not saying I liked both of those guys coming out of college, but I did.


Anyway, I added a couple more players. Adrian Clayborn (1st rounder) & Nate Solder (4th rounder).

iowatreat54
09-10-2010, 11:42 AM
Great job BB.

On Clayborn's arm issue, I think he's done a terrific job "compensating" for it in college ball. However, there have been several plays where a player of his caliber should have been able to wrap up a QB for a sack or other player, but he seemed to just miss. I wonder if this has to do with his hesitation to use both arms. You can see a handful of easy sacks where he primarily uses one arm to bring the QB down, but he seemingly uses both arms to wrap up ball carriers against the run. If I were an NFL team I would definitely be cautious of this. I think they will need to find out if it is indeed a physical limitation, or just a mental/comfort issue that can be fixed.

Babylon
09-10-2010, 03:57 PM
It'll be interesting to see if Kerrigan and Clayborn can both make it into the 1st round because they seem to be similar players to me.

BigBanger
09-20-2010, 11:06 AM
It'll be interesting to see if Kerrigan and Clayborn can both make it into the 1st round because they seem to be similar players to me.
I think Kerrigan will be a lock to go round 1. His tape is just too good. He has the size. There's nothing keeping him out of round 1. Clayborn is going to have to address his arm. If teams are comfortable with it, then he'll be a high pick. If they're not, he could drop out of the first round entirely.



Added Prince Amukamara (Elite) and Allen Bailey (Round 2).

Also added (finalized) grades to most players with the exception of Ayers (his grade could go up or down - right now I'd probably give him a top 20 grade).

I was also going to add Niles Paul to the first round, but I decided I need to see more from him. Washington's terrible defense wasn't a great game to watch.

Sniper
09-20-2010, 04:58 PM
Tremendous write-up. I found myself agreeing with you on several points, though I'm not sure Kerrigan will go in the top five picks.

Don Vito
09-20-2010, 05:01 PM
I remember Marvin Austin being touted as the next Warren Sapp out of HS, people said he had 4.6 or 4.7 speed as a DT. Was that just all bs or did he just get unathletic?

ThePudge
09-20-2010, 05:22 PM
I remember Marvin Austin being touted as the next Warren Sapp out of HS, people said he had 4.6 or 4.7 speed as a DT. Was that just all bs or did he just get unathletic?

His athleticism isn't the problem. His technique is non-existent & his work ethic leaves a lot to be desired.

703SKINS202
09-20-2010, 06:06 PM
Really nice writeup. Think you hit on a lot of things about Baldwin that people are sleeping on. I'm not as high on Amukamara but I would LOVE it if the Redskins had two first rounders and used one of those on Ingram, he's going to be awesome I don't understand the disrespect.

ChiFan24
09-20-2010, 06:19 PM
Nice, keep these coming.

As for Kerrigan, I think top 15 is a more realistic ceiling. Top 5 I'd reserve for violent, explosive types of pass rushers that can easily project as 15 sack guys; I don't know if you're getting that in Kerrigan. I'd say he can be an Aaron Kampman type, which is to say one of the best DE's in the league, but he's gonna do it with his motor, his understanding of leverage, and just great pass rushing instincts. And those aren't really the traits that appeal to teams in the top 5. I think of him the same way I thought of Brandon Graham last year; wouldn't shock me at all to see the him become a 15 sack guy, though I'd be far more comfortable calling him a 10 sack guy (and drafting him in the 10-15 range accordingly).

Also loved and agreed 100% with the Amukamara write up right down to the last sentence; the more I see him the more I drool at the possibility of him in a Bears uniform.

What, may I ask, is the difference between elite and top 5 in your mind?

RealityCheck
09-20-2010, 08:52 PM
Having Kerrigan in the Top 5 and Austin and Solder in the late rounds is somewhat bold.

However, props for the work.

BigBanger
09-21-2010, 01:11 AM
Nice, keep these coming.

As for Kerrigan, I think top 15 is a more realistic ceiling. Top 5 I'd reserve for violent, explosive types of pass rushers that can easily project as 15 sack guys; I don't know if you're getting that in Kerrigan. I'd say he can be an Aaron Kampman type, which is to say one of the best DE's in the league, but he's gonna do it with his motor, his understanding of leverage, and just great pass rushing instincts. And those aren't really the traits that appeal to teams in the top 5. I think of him the same way I thought of Brandon Graham last year; wouldn't shock me at all to see the him become a 15 sack guy, though I'd be far more comfortable calling him a 10 sack guy (and drafting him in the 10-15 range accordingly).
The 15 sack guy simply doesn't exist. I used to think that way too, but I've noticed a trend. The guys with the 15 sack potential never do it and the guys with the 10 sack potential consistently get those 10 sacks. The guys with 15? They bust. The guy you described (bold), these were the first names that popped into my head...

Clay Matthews
Jared Allen
DeMarcus Ware
Dwight Freeney
Chris Long
Robert Mathis
Elvis Dumervil
Cameron Wake
Trent Cole
LaMarr Woodley
Anthony Spencer
Brian Orakpo
Tamba Hali
Ray Edwards

Those are, pretty much, the best pass rushers in the NFL... coincidently. Take a look where most of them were drafted. They weren't the freak athletes that went in the top 5 of the draft.


Let's take a look at the pass rushers taken in the top 25 (or so) over the last few years...

2009
#3 Tyson Jackson
#11 Aaron Maybin
#13 Brian Orakpo
#16 Larry English
#18 Robert Ayers
#26 Clay Matthews

2008
#2 Chris Long
#6 Vernon Gholston
#8 Derrick Harvey

2007
#4 Gaines Adams
#8 Jamaal Anderson
#17 Jarvis Moss
#26 Anthony Spencer

2006
#1 Mario Williams
#13 Kamerion Wimbley
#20 Tamba Hali
#22 Manny Lawson

2005
#11 DeMarcus Ware
#12 Shawne Merriman
#17 David Pollack
#18 Erasmus James

2004
#18 Will Smith
#20 Kenechi Udeze
#27 Jason Babin

2003
#10 Terrell Suggs
#13 Ty Warren
#14 Michael Haynes
#15 Jerome McDougle
#18 Calvin Pace

2002
#2 Julius Peppers
#11 Dwight Freeney
#22 Bryan Thomas

2001
#4 Justin Smith
#7 Andre Carter
#10 Jamal Reynolds

2000
#1 Courtney Brown
#12 Shaun Ellis
#13 John Abraham

How many guys deserved to be taken where they were? How many were drafted where they were based on potential? How many dropped because they lacked the 15 sack potential? Because they relied on technique? Or motor?

Also loved and agreed 100% with the Amukamara write up right down to the last sentence; the more I see him the more I drool at the possibility of him in a Bears uniform.
Really, the sky is the limit with him. He was a running back coming out of High School. He had just 2 starts going into his junior season. The guy is a natural corner with jaw dropping instincts. I think he's a bigger, faster version of Brandon Flowers. I don't think anybody loved Brandon Flowers more than me. I had a top 5 grade for him. Amukamara gets an elite grade because he has the elite tools to go along with elite instincts. I'm probably higher on him than most. Right now... he's the #1 player on my board (I simply doubt Luck will enter. If he does, then Luck is my #1 guy). Still early, but that's just how much I like him.


What, may I ask, is the difference between elite and top 5 in your mind?
Very little to be honest, but there's enough to separate them. I look at it this way: I know an elite player when I see him. When I watch Calvin Johnson, I don't need to critique him. He's just better than everyone else. His size and speed is great. His hands are excellent. He's a very good route runner, excellent quickness and acceleration. Gets separation, production is great, even with a **** QB. The guy is simply the prototype for what you look for in a WR.

Dez Bryant was similar but I didn't always see that top end speed. That elite quickness in and out of his breaks. I had a top 5 grade on him. There's the difference. Very slight difference, but there's a difference. I still have high expectations, but he lacks the ceiling (potential) that a Calvin Johnson has. Johnson is the total package and the elite physical tools to boot. Darren McFadden had great physical tools, but he lacked the patience, vision and instincts for the position.

Ryan Kerrigan is, in a lot of ways, a better college player than Mario Williams ever was. But, Williams had elite size, ridiculous strength and speed and just unreal potential. He played a little high, had a questionable motor and relied on pure talent a little too much, but everything was there to be elite. He simply has more (better) tools than Ryan Kerrigan ever dreamed of and %99 of other defensive ends. He showed me enough instincts natural ability to dominate to go along with some of the most ridiculous physical gifts a player has ever had. He was a once a decade player. That is an elite player. Ryan Kerrigan types come on a yearly basis. That is a top 5 player.

I think he's a Chris Long type DE. I think you watch Long, the way he works, the way he hustles, the way he works an offensive tackle and how he just battles play in and play out... that guy is going to win a lot more than he'll lose. Now, you watch Chris Long and even though he doesn't have the production a lot of people expected, he just keeps coming and coming and coming. He alone uplifts that defense because of his energy and passion. I see Kerrigan the same way. I think Kerrigan is more stout against the run and a better fit at DE than Long was (who was a better fit as a rush back in a 34). Those are the guys I like. I'd rather have an overachiever with a non stop motor, great work ethic and the physical ability that's real good, but not elite... yeah, I'll take that all day. I'll take Brandon Graham over Gaines Adams all day. I'll take him over Aaron Maybin too. Definitely over Jarvis Moss.



Having Kerrigan in the Top 5 and Austin and Solder in the late rounds is somewhat bold.

However, props for the work.
I'll be higher on Kerrigan than most everyone else will, but the cream will rise to the top and he'll "move up draft boards" - which means people will start realizing how good he is. Austin and Solder will drop. Solder just flat out sucks. Austin... he's whatever. He looks and plays the part of a 5th or 6th rounder. He has the attitude and work ethic of a guy you don't even consider drafting or even signing in free agency.

jason96r
09-21-2010, 02:38 PM
Amukakamara with elite speed? I know you are going off what you have seen rather than what he may run at the combine but his lack of top end speed is what I thought would be his perhaps only flaw.

ToldLikeItIs
09-21-2010, 04:24 PM
Elite instincts, Elite tools?

You guys have no idea what you're talking about.

roscoesdad27
09-21-2010, 05:31 PM
Amukakamara with elite speed? I know you are going off what you have seen rather than what he may run at the combine but his lack of top end speed is what I thought would be his perhaps only flaw.
His 40 time at the combine will be very interesting and could prove everything i'm about to type wrong.....
I personnaly predict a 4.40-4.44 makin him a potential top ten pick, he just doesnt seem quite as explosive as peterson whom i'm all but sure will be in the 4.3's. I love prince but this is your classic "elite" vs. "top 5" example, with petersons superior potential making for a clear tier change.

my top 5 c.b.'s
1) peterson
2) amukamara
3) jenkins
4) williams
5) harris

Also I agree with you on Baldwin (and floyd) being more or less scheme dependant but at the same time hes perfect for that scheme. I would love him in a power run playaction scheme like the ravens, detriot or atlanta who already have a #1. This would give baldwin 1 on 1 jump ball matchups down field when a safety goes in the box, which kinda makes up for his agreed lack of overall quickness and route running abilities in that scheme. However in a west coast or martz type scheme his value could go to the bottom of round 2 or even 3. In the end I'm thinkin a top 30 pick with an oustide chance of getting into the top 20 if the situation is right.

top 5 power run/p.a. w.r.'s
1) green
2) jones
3) baldwin
4) floyd
5) brown

top 5 west coast recievers
1) green
2) jones
3) broyles
4) posey
5) brown

Love kerrigan as well but he isnt quite as explosive, and i think that'll show at the combine, as you would like a top 5 pick to be....not quite the athelete chris long is either just to critique your comparison. However he has a TREMENDOUS motor and is excellent in run support to go along with what I think will be a solid yet unspectacular combine....i think he could be a great l.e. but only a good r.e. in the league which also hurts his value....with that said he will most probably go in the first round of the next mock i do, he's a baller.

top 5 4-3 l.e.'s
1) kerrigan
2) quinn
3) bowers
4) clayborn
5) smith

top 5 r.e.'s
1) quinn



2) acho
3) kerrigan
4) smith
5) beal

BigBanger
09-22-2010, 12:26 AM
His 40 time at the combine will be very interesting and could prove everything i'm about to type wrong.....
I personnaly predict a 4.40-4.44 makin him a potential top ten pick, he just doesnt seem quite as explosive as peterson whom i'm all but sure will be in the 4.3's. I love prince but this is your classic "elite" vs. "top 5" example, with petersons superior potential making for a clear tier change.

my top 5 c.b.'s
1) peterson
2) amukamara
3) jenkins
4) williams
5) harris

Also I agree with you on Baldwin (and floyd) being more or less scheme dependant but at the same time hes perfect for that scheme. I would love him in a power run playaction scheme like the ravens, detriot or atlanta who already have a #1. This would give baldwin 1 on 1 jump ball matchups down field when a safety goes in the box, which kinda makes up for his agreed lack of overall quickness and route running abilities in that scheme. However in a west coast or martz type scheme his value could go to the bottom of round 2 or even 3. In the end I'm thinkin a top 30 pick with an oustide chance of getting into the top 20 if the situation is right.

top 5 power run/p.a. w.r.'s
1) green
2) jones
3) baldwin
4) floyd
5) brown

top 5 west coast recievers
1) green
2) jones
3) broyles
4) posey
5) brown

Love kerrigan as well but he isnt quite as explosive, and i think that'll show at the combine, as you would like a top 5 pick to be....not quite the athelete chris long is either just to critique your comparison. However he has a TREMENDOUS motor and is excellent in run support to go along with what I think will be a solid yet unspectacular combine....i think he could be a great l.e. but only a good r.e. in the league which also hurts his value....with that said he will most probably go in the first round of the next mock i do, he's a baller.

top 5 4-3 l.e.'s
1) kerrigan
2) quinn
3) bowers
4) clayborn
5) smith

top 5 r.e.'s
1) quinn



2) acho
3) kerrigan
4) smith
5) beal
I was comparing Kerrigan's motor, work ethic, technique to Chris Long's. I didn't mean to compare them as players. I do agree that Long was much more athletic (He blew me away at the Combine). I thought he was best suited to play OLB though. I don't think Kerrigan has nearly the same kind of athletic ability in space. He's an ideal 43 DE. I LOVE Robert Quinn's potential, but, if he ever gets on the field this year, I want to see how much he has improved from a technique standpoint. I want to see more consistency as well.


As far as CBs go... I just love this class. Peterson is amazing. When I see more from him, he will also push for my elite status. Aaron Williams is one of my favorite players in the draft. Those 3, to me, might be the 3 best players in the draft in my book. I know most people consider Aaron Williams as a mid to late first rounder right now, but I'm searching for a flaw in his game. The length, the speed, the fluidity he has is really amazing.

Amukakamara with elite speed? I know you are going off what you have seen rather than what he may run at the combine but his lack of top end speed is what I thought would be his perhaps only flaw.
I haven't seen all his games, but from what I've seen I was projecting 4.45 type speed (I've seen him get beat with a double move and run a defender down against a ball that was thrown very well- WR didn't have to let up). Everyone else has Amukamara projected to be in the 4.4s as well. Unless I see something from now until the end of the season that makes me question his speed, I still consider it "excellent" speed. Not really elite speed that I see from him. Patrick Peterson has elite speed. Are there any game(s) in specific where his top end speed was exposed?

If he runs at the Combine and runs over a 4.50, then I will take that little elite tag away from him, slap him on the hand and then throw it away. I had to do it with Malcolm Jenkins, but it was expected for him to run a slower time.


Elite instincts, Elite tools?

You guys have no idea what you're talking about.
Go to the Big 10 Thread or the random Iowa Thread and talk about your boys there. There's nothing here for you to see.

Poz51
09-22-2010, 07:08 AM
I'll be higher on Kerrigan than most everyone else will, but the cream will rise to the top and he'll "move up draft boards" - which means people will start realizing how good he is. Austin and Solder will drop. Solder just flat out sucks. Austin... he's whatever. He looks and plays the part of a 5th or 6th rounder. He has the attitude and work ethic of a guy you don't even consider drafting or even signing in free agency. I'll take Brandon Graham over Gaines Adams all day. I'll take him over Aaron Maybin too. Definitely over Jarvis Moss.


First off, fantastic write up, great work!! I dont agree with everything you said, but it was a good read, and well thoughtout IMO and I respect your opinions. I particualarly liked the Graham over Maybin point, and Solder and Austin dropping. Nice work.

FUNBUNCHER
09-22-2010, 09:52 AM
His athleticism isn't the problem. His technique is non-existent & his work ethic leaves a lot to be desired.

Austin's problem is he lacks a great motor or high football IQ for a DT. Very minimal technique for an interior player. Occasionally he flashes ability, but there's no consistency in his play and rarely was a difference maker.

With that Carolina Dline and LBs, Austin should have been dominant at UNC.

jason96r
09-24-2010, 08:54 AM
Thanks for clarifying your Amukumara opinions. I've never seen him really beat because of lack of speed and I think he is a 4.45 guy too. However, even if runs that are a bit slower those who over-evaluate, I'm talking about NFL teams, may question his speed and drop him a little. I hope he does display atleast mid 4.4 speed and a great 10 and 20 yard split as he is known as more quick than fast.

I personally think Amukumara has the potential to be the be the best player in the 2011 draft. He won't be drafted #1 but will be drafted quite high and his potential is out of this world. To be so good with so little time focused on just the CB position is quite impressive.

BigBanger
03-09-2011, 04:35 PM
Updated this and added quite a few players. Changed some grades and tweaked the players I already had up there.

I don't want to sound arrogant, but this is a pretty iconic thread.