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vikes_28
09-27-2010, 10:10 PM
So the past few years, I've been in and out of two schools. I'm sure you can probably guess what this is going to be about.

The reason I've been in and out of different schools isn't because I'm stupid or anything like that (insert Ginger joke here), but because I just really haven't decided what I want to do. I'm currently attending a Tech school in South Dakota for a two year degree in Graphic Communications. Well, I decided already this semester that I don't want to go into that. And I'm going to finish this semester obviously. I like what I'm doing, but I just can't see myself doing it in the future.

I basically have my options figured out.

Option 1:

I switch my major at this Tech School to Computer Programming. I took a CP class in High School and really enjoyed it once I understood it. I would do this immediately next semester. And again, I could also see myself dropping out of this in a year too.

Option 2:

I drop out after 1st semester, and start again in the fall. I would just be finishing up generals at a school in the same town. My hope would be that I would go on to get an education degree. Something that I've always wanted to do.

Option 3:

Suck it up and finish the program I'm in.

To add to this, I talked to my mom tonight about it, and my mom being a mom, was totally un-understanding. She thinks I would be quitting school completely, totally not the case. She really doesn't understand that dropping at semester time isn't like dropping a class in high school. Cause typically classes don't carry over to the next semester.

I guess that I just need some advice. I don't want to leave Sioux Falls right now, cause I have a really good job here and an apartment.

Please, to the people who don't like me, resist your urge to just make fun of me and don't post here. Serious responses only please.

Jvig43
09-27-2010, 10:17 PM
I'm in the same situation, I'm on my second school, got a ton of credits yet still dont know what I want to do with them as I have to start actually make a decision in what I'm going to settle majoring in. For me personally, I'm going to find that one thing that I know I'll love doing no matter what even if it takes me more time because I want to be happy. If you want to go for an education degree, I'd say go for it. Thats actually one of the things ive seriously been thinking about this past year or so, so its kind of weird to see almost similar thoughts put out there. Do what youve wanted and what youll love doing. I took a semester off two years ago and it really helped me get my **** together, so it isnt really a bad thing. Maybe even take it off regardless just to get your thoughts together and use the time to figure out what road you eventually want to go down.

Brent
09-27-2010, 10:23 PM
attend a 4 year university and get a degree. after that, it's rather relative if your major has any thing to do with what you go into.

prock
09-27-2010, 10:33 PM
**** bitches and get money, that's what I would do.

But, I personally would go for that education degree.

aLARGEtopHat
09-27-2010, 10:55 PM
attend a 4 year university and get a degree. after that, it's rather relative if your major has any thing to do with what you go into.
This is only true if you get a liberal arts or communications degree.

derza222
09-27-2010, 11:42 PM
If you've always wanted to get an education degree and are pretty unsure about whether or not you actually would want to work in any of those other fields, I think the education degree is the best way for you to go.

descendency
09-28-2010, 01:11 AM
Don't waste your time getting a programming degree from a tech school. If you want to be a computer janitor the rest of your life making 25-30k, then just move to a state that needs math teachers badly (and therefore has relaxed requirements to become one) and teach algebra. Better pay, similar work environment, minimum job skills required. (edit: 2 year tech degrees don't make 50+K a year. Software engineers do. They don't pay those guys peanuts, unless you get into an ultra niche area where you have to do lots of d*ck sucking to get and keep it - like maintaining COBOL code on old machines)

Whatever you do, don't take a break. Take general education classes. They always apply to all degrees.

---

edit: the only way I would ever suggest skipping a semester is if you have a temp job/internship lined up for that period.

--

This is only true if you get a liberal arts or communications degree.

No, it isn't. I have comp sci friends who do work in fields that are unrelated to their degrees because they refuse to take computer janitor jobs/sh*tty IT jobs.

Caddy
09-28-2010, 03:10 AM
Come to Australia and live with me!

wogitalia
09-28-2010, 07:01 AM
Come to Australia and live with me!

We have enough gingers Caddy, including the PM!

Mate I would suggest doing what you've always wanted to do, worst case scenario you try it and find out you don't like it and you are back where you are. As someone doing something that I don't really want to do long term I can tell you I regret not going for those jobs I did want to do harder when it would have been far easier to do so!

vikes_28
09-28-2010, 08:05 AM
Come to Australia and live with me!

Ha, that would be fun. Descendency, I was actually hoping you would respond since you said somewhere you were a computer programming major. Your advice really seemed to help.

I'll probably keep a few classes next semester if I decide I want to pursue an education degree.

Addict
09-28-2010, 08:16 AM
Ha, that would be fun. Descendency, I was actually hoping you would respond since you said somewhere you were a computer programming major. Your advice really seemed to help.

I'll probably keep a few classes next semester if I decide I want to pursue an education degree.

Yeah man, I'd say just go for the Education Degree if that's what you wanna do...

bsaza2358
09-28-2010, 08:53 AM
So the past few years, I've been in and out of two schools. I'm sure you can probably guess what this is going to be about.

The reason I've been in and out of different schools isn't because I'm stupid or anything like that (insert Ginger joke here), but because I just really haven't decided what I want to do. I'm currently attending a Tech school in South Dakota for a two year degree in Graphic Communications. Well, I decided already this semester that I don't want to go into that. And I'm going to finish this semester obviously. I like what I'm doing, but I just can't see myself doing it in the future.

I basically have my options figured out.

Option 1:

I switch my major at this Tech School to Computer Programming. I took a CP class in High School and really enjoyed it once I understood it. I would do this immediately next semester. And again, I could also see myself dropping out of this in a year too.

Option 2:

I drop out after 1st semester, and start again in the fall. I would just be finishing up generals at a school in the same town. My hope would be that I would go on to get an education degree. Something that I've always wanted to do.

Option 3:

Suck it up and finish the program I'm in.

To add to this, I talked to my mom tonight about it, and my mom being a mom, was totally un-understanding. She thinks I would be quitting school completely, totally not the case. She really doesn't understand that dropping at semester time isn't like dropping a class in high school. Cause typically classes don't carry over to the next semester.

I guess that I just need some advice. I don't want to leave Sioux Falls right now, cause I have a really good job here and an apartment.

Please, to the people who don't like me, resist your urge to just make fun of me and don't post here. Serious responses only please.

I would say that this situation is really up to you. You have to decide what you want. It seems from the options presented here that you are most interested in education. If that is what you want to do with your life, you have to pursue that dream with everything you have. Frankly, if you want to be in education, getting an associates degree is probably a waste of your time and money (or parents money?). I understand your momís trepidation. She sees you not pursuing something you are absolutely passionate about, and you keep changing your mind and switching schools. If you want to be taken seriously by other people, you have to show initiative and passion for what youíre doing.

If youíre not ready to commit passionately to pursuing your dreams, perhaps taking a break from college and school is what you need. The problem is, once you leave, it is really hard to get back into it. My brother took ďa year offĒ after 3 semesters of college, and he didnít go back until age 27. However, he went back on his own terms, and now he is kicking butt. Just saying that working until youíre ready to really pursue something isnít the worst idea. It might not be what your parents and others want for you, but they also donít want you to go through the motions.

To me, it looks like you do have a dilemma, but people on this board are not going to be able to solve it. You need to pick a direction and stick it out. I recommend against the Graphic Communications path because you donít seem passionate about it. Take some time to really think about what you want to do with your life. Perhaps college is not the answer right now. Perhaps staying and living and working in Sioux Falls is what you want to do. Do that to the fullest. Save money. Live life. However, if you think your future is in education, you are doing yourself a disservice by not pursuing it. You have some sort of mental block that is preventing you from making a decision here. Stop dicking around on a message board and take time to yourself to come up with your answer. We will all respect your decision because it is your own. Good luck.

nepg
09-28-2010, 11:28 AM
attend a 4 year university and get a degree. after that, it's rather relative if your major has any thing to do with what you go into.
I agree with the 4-year school, but disagree that major is irrelevant. In the tech field, it really matters.

I don't like tech schools, they don't seem to do anything for you other than take your money.

Todd Bertuzzi
09-28-2010, 11:35 AM
Yeah man, I'd say just go for the Education Degree if that's what you wanna do...

I would not want vikes teaching my children...

The_Dude
09-28-2010, 08:25 PM
i hate to be debbie downer, but right now might not be the best time to go the education route. Maybe if you are looking into math or science, otherwise you are kind of ****** when looking for jobs.

i love being a teacher, but we are in a down turn here in MN & i imagine that many other states are in a similar situation.

If you think that you would truely love it & that you would be good at it, then go for it. Just make sure that you have something that makes you stnad out far from the crowd. That is the only way to get your foot in the door for positions. I know a number of education grads that are now doing something outside of education.

Just my opinion, so take it for what it is worth.

aLARGEtopHat
09-28-2010, 09:39 PM
Education has to be one of the easiest professions to get into if you ask me...

Werowance
09-28-2010, 09:42 PM
Education has to be one of the easiest professions to get into if you ask me...

And thats the problem IMO.

brat316
09-28-2010, 09:48 PM
I don't like Mechanical engineering any more but I'm stick it out.

Also computer programming at a tech school don't do it, rather go to a 4 year college and get a CIS, MIS or computer engineering or computer sciences, software engineering degree. You still get to ride code if you like that stuff, but you'll get paid more and you would be in charge of the guys that have 2 year tech degree in computer programming.

FuzzyGopher
09-28-2010, 09:54 PM
I wouldn't recommend taking a complete break. Even if if you just take 2 or 3 classes while you try to figure things out it will help a lot in the long run. And get a Bachelor's Degree, don't waste your time in a tech school specializing in something that you might not have an interest in several years down the line. A Bachelor's is going to offer you a lot more flexibility. And believe me you're going to change your mind about your future a lot in the coming years, it's natural and as you get older things will start to sort themselves out and things will become more clear. Just stay in school, even if it's part time, and work towards a degree in something. In my opinion it doesn't really matter what your undergrad degree is in unless you're going into some sort of specialty field.

Brent
09-28-2010, 10:26 PM
Education has to be one of the easiest professions to get into if you ask me...
no, the problem is that people see the perceived job security and think that it's something any one can do. however, it really comes down to a person either being over qualified for the job they're applying for, or knowing the right people. if I didnt student teach where I am working, I never would have had my job, I would be teaching in some barrio outside Austin commonly referred to as Bastrop.

jballa838
09-28-2010, 10:29 PM
South Dakota is the worst place on the planet. All that's there is Rushmore and HyVee's

vikes_28
09-28-2010, 10:48 PM
South Dakota is the worst place on the planet. All that's there is Rushmore and HyVee's

Nah, South Dakota isn't that bad. I will say that Rushmore is pretty boring though.

Thanks for the advice jballa!

The_Dude
09-29-2010, 10:11 AM
no, the problem is that people see the perceived job security and think that it's something any one can do. however, it really comes down to a person either being over qualified for the job they're applying for, or knowing the right people. if I didnt student teach where I am working, I never would have had my job, I would be teaching in some barrio outside Austin commonly referred to as Bastrop.

QFT. It is not an easy job to get into or an "easy" job in general. Those people who think that it is are obviously not teachers.

aLARGEtopHat
09-29-2010, 11:49 AM
What on earth is so hard about getting into teaching? It is filled with idiotic women at my school... Ill give you it might be hard to get into a decent suburb/city out of college, but if you are willing to move it isn't that hard to start a career in i. Can always go teach English in a different country, which is also pretty good pay compared to most teachers.

The_Dude
09-29-2010, 12:03 PM
It is hard because the market is flooded with available teachers. There are sometimes hundreds of applicants for open positions. There were 200 applicants for the part time position that i got and the only reason that i got an interview in the first place was because of my special ed teaching experience. You are correct, there are more undesirable positions available, but that is because they are undesirable. :)

CJSchneider
09-29-2010, 01:42 PM
Education has to be one of the easiest professions to get into if you ask me...

What on earth is so hard about getting into teaching? It is filled with idiotic women at my school... Ill give you it might be hard to get into a decent suburb/city out of college, but if you are willing to move it isn't that hard to start a career in i. Can always go teach English in a different country, which is also pretty good pay compared to most teachers.

The fact that people perceive me and my fellow teachers as glorified babysitters and not as educators infuriates me.

brat316
09-29-2010, 07:28 PM
The fact that people perceive me and my fellow teachers as glorified babysitters and not as educators infuriates me.

How do you feel about whats happening in NJ? To prove that they are not babysitters the governor is trying to pass a law pay based on performance. Cause of something like 4 out of 10 students in the state can't read. Also because some teachers boost their pay by getting a master or dr. but don't actually improve their students abilities. This would help prove they are not babysitters but a lot of teachers are against it. I think its somewhat of a good idea, I see the positives to both side. They just need to find somewhat of a middle ground it can be a good thing, motivating some teachers to earn their pay. But you also can't base it on standardize testing only, some students are just bad at that, and some are just bad at school

aLARGEtopHat
09-29-2010, 07:46 PM
How do you feel about whats happening in NJ? To prove that they are not babysitters the governor is trying to pass a law pay based on performance. Cause of something like 4 out of 10 students in the state can't read. Also because some teachers boost their pay by getting a master or dr. but don't actually improve their students abilities. This would help prove they are not babysitters but a lot of teachers are against it. I think its somewhat of a good idea, I see the positives to both side. They just need to find somewhat of a middle ground it can be a good thing, motivating some teachers to earn their pay. But you also can't base it on standardize testing only, some students are just bad at that, and some are just bad at school
Just wondering, but would the teacher be rewarded if the student did good overall on standardized test or just on a certain subject? Then how do you do electives? et cetera. How much of salary is he attempting to put onto bonuses, or cut out of current salaries?

The main problem I see here would be just teaching memorization of testing techniques instead of teaching the underlying foundation of the material, although it is probably taught like this today anyway.

If the only problem was that some students do poor on standardized tests then you could have them take some form of test entering highschool, so that you could create a formula to evenly distribute the awards for good teaching.

brat316
09-29-2010, 07:49 PM
We really need to find out what other countries are doing. We may have the most and best universities in the world. But our primary education is a piece of **** compared to other countries, its just a bad and old system that needs to be updated.

CJSchneider
09-29-2010, 07:53 PM
How do you feel about whats happening in NJ? To prove that they are not babysitters the governor is trying to pass a law pay based on performance. Cause of something like 4 out of 10 students in the state can't read. Also because some teachers boost their pay by getting a master or dr. but don't actually improve their students abilities. This would help prove they are not babysitters but a lot of teachers are against it. I think its somewhat of a good idea, I see the positives to both side. They just need to find somewhat of a middle ground it can be a good thing, motivating some teachers to earn their pay. But you also can't base it on standardize testing only, some students are just bad at that, and some are just bad at school

I agree with the fact that this is a difficult area in which to find a "middle ground" on in regards to what to base the teacher's performance on. Here is Louisiana, teachers can earn pay bonuses if 75% or more of their class improves their score from one year to the next on our state test. I have known teachers who have earned this bonus,and four years ago, was two students away from earning the myself (Sadly I haven't been eligible for the last four years because I have taught an elective those years). I am all for providing teachers with bonuses based on performance.

I also feel that higher positions in the organizational chain need to be made available only to former educators with compulsory education experience and the criteria for those positions need to be made more stringent. From there, the qualifications for Principal needs to be increased, then allow Principals to cut a minimal percentage of teachers (regardless of tenure) based on a pattern of negative or drastically less then optimal performance evaluations.

CJSchneider
09-29-2010, 08:19 PM
aLARGEtopHat, before I make any incorrect assumptions, how old are you, where do you live and what is your occupation and level of education?

aLARGEtopHat
09-29-2010, 09:00 PM
aLARGEtopHat, before I make any incorrect assumptions, how old are you, where do you live and what is your occupation and level of education? 22m/Houston/finance/degree from UT-Austin

yourfavestoner
09-29-2010, 09:11 PM
We really need to find out what other countries are doing. We may have the most and best universities in the world. But our primary education is a piece of **** compared to other countries, its just a bad and old system that needs to be updated.

That's because the establishment has consistently found ways to hinder the education process (new math, the elimination of phonics, etc.). Whether it's done with a purposefully and in bad faith is up to debate, but there is no debate that the education system has been consistently undermined in the past twenty years or so.

And then there's No Child Left Behind. Excuse me, but can anybody think of a worse idea than giving the federal government the authority to micromanage the education system?

And lastly, they've gotta get rid of tenure for teachers. It hurts everyone. We've got an endless supply of bright, young minds who can't find teaching jobs because of decrepit union whores who babysit, collect a check, and watch their pensions rack up. I know it's not that way everywhere, but that's how it is in California.

CJSchneider
09-29-2010, 09:25 PM
That's because the establishment has consistently found ways to hinder the education process (new math, the elimination of phonics, etc.). Whether it's done with a purposefully and in bad faith is up to debate, but there is no debate that the education system has been consistently undermined in the past twenty years or so.

And then there's No Child Left Behind. Excuse me, but can anybody think of a worse idea than giving the federal government the authority to micromanage the education system?

And lastly, they've gotta get rid of tenure for teachers. It hurts everyone. We've got an endless supply of bright, young minds who can't find teaching jobs because of decrepit union whores who babysit, collect a check, and watch their pensions rack up. I know it's not that way everywhere, but that's how it is in California.

In order:
The biggest hindrance I feel is how the govt. has tied our hands in regards to discipline and the SPED laws (I'll go into detail if I have to, I'm just getting it out there).

Like everything, it needs to be managed, but people who have no idea how to run a classroom in various settings are now being able to do so thanks to NCLB, That needs to change, but I said that in an earlier post.

Tenure needs to change, but not be done away with all together. I will agree with that (I'll elaborate here if I have to as well).

ALTH, you may want to look into state content standards and GLE's as well as test construction for high stakes testing in the US. You'd be surprised how much goes into making sure teachers teach skills that can be used across any medium, not just a test given in the Spring or whenever.

Paranoidmoonduck
09-29-2010, 09:30 PM
Tenure needs to change, but not be done away with all together. I will agree with that (I'll elaborate here if I have to as well).

Would a simple request be enough to elaborate? I'm always fascinated to hear teachers talk about the issues of the education sytem because my whole life has been spent on the other side of that system.

It would seem to me that if schools were more able to fire teachers for not being adequate, less of them would reach tenure. That may be a simplification though.

Forenci
09-29-2010, 09:32 PM
The fact that people perceive me and my fellow teachers as glorified babysitters and not as educators infuriates me.

I hear you. I'm not a teacher myself, although I may be at some future date, but I respect the hell out of most teachers. While sure, some of them are poor educators who will abuse tenure, I feel like most of them are underpaid, undervalued, and the first in line for politicians and parents to blame when their kids don't do well in school.

A lot has to do with an outdated education philosophy (and system). Although I will say, even with outdated teaching methods, the difference between those who receive an education and those who don't is pretty stark in how they will fare economically, and even as a member of a society and community.

I would love (obviously not in this thread, as I don't wish to derail it any further from vikes) to have a discussion on what reforms and restructures could be made to improve the education system.

CJSchneider
09-29-2010, 09:38 PM
Would a simple request be enough to elaborate? I'm always fascinated to hear teachers talk about the issues of the education sytem because my whole life has been spent on the other side of that system.

Yes, it would. Please submit your request.

Just kidding. I think tenure must be something you earn through a set of standards that are constantly maintained (positive performance evaluations, school service points, etc.) not something you earn because you held your job for 3 years and then you get to sit in the safe-zone for the next 27. Also, my pay comes from Title 1 (Federal enhancement for brevity's sake) funds. Because of that, I can not earn tenure. I have taught for coming up on ten years, but because I have always taught an elective (and because of that I have had my salary paid with the Title 1 funds) in addition to a core subject, I have no tenure. Now, I have done enough to ensure that I am a valued member of my school's faculty and will not be let go, but the possibility exists none the less.

CJSchneider
09-29-2010, 09:40 PM
I would love (obviously not in this thread, as I don't wish to derail it any further from vikes) to have a discussion on what reforms and restructures could be made to improve the education system.

If vikes pulls anything from this, I hope he decides to go after a degree in education because he wishes to make a difference in a child's life and not because it was an available option.

descendency
09-29-2010, 09:44 PM
I like CJ, but the fact is that most teachers (while they may try to be more than that) are glorified babysitters.

When you have the bottom 2% dictating what the top 98% learn, you have babysitters. It's dead near impossible to get out of one level and promoted to another. I spent a month trying to prove I was capable of doing basic algebra so I didn't have to take the class. After that month, they gave me some kind of placement test and properly moved me up but still... there are plenty of situations where more than half a class are basically captive to teachers trying to educate people who either A.) can't learn or B.) don't want to or C.) both.

It's a shame, but 1/3 of students need to be in a day care (McDonald's Prep U), 1/3 need to be in classes like they are now, and 1/3 need to be in real classes where learning is an order of magnitude more difficult (or people expect a lot more out of you). Instead, we jam them all in one class and hope they all fair well.

For places with Honors systems or AP/CP or IB, it is better than the regular approach, but still very very lacking.

jballa838
09-29-2010, 10:25 PM
Nah, South Dakota isn't that bad. I will say that Rushmore is pretty boring though.

Thanks for the advice jballa!
where are you in south dakota?

and follow your dreams. That's all we have at the end of the day that can't be taken from us.

The_Dude
09-29-2010, 10:41 PM
I have to agree with all that CJ has already said on this subject.

Tenure is an avenue towards job security, but it is a system that is easily abused. I do work with some people (albeit a small amount, thankfully) who have decided long ago to simply "go through the motions" (ie press "play") and their job is more than safe due to the tenure system. There are also a number of fantastic teachers who work very hard to educate the students as well as help them develop socially, emotionally, as well as develop skills that will help them be successful in their lives outside of the classroom. Unfortunately i know too many who are currently sweating things out because they are on the bottom of the tenure totem pole & the outlook for our district isn't all that rosy.

Also, i agree that a fair amount of education is geared towards the lowest common denominator, but again, that is where good teaching comes in. Differentiating curriculum and encouraging higher level thinkers to go beyond the standard classroom practices/assignments is what good teachers do. But those students have to be motivated to go the extra yard. You have to remember that the most important player in education is the student. I feel that a large part of our job is to introduce information & skills to the students and then encourage them to explore it further on their own.

CJSchneider
09-30-2010, 08:35 AM
I like CJ, but the fact is that most teachers (while they may try to be more than that) are glorified babysitters.

When you have the bottom 2% dictating what the top 98% learn, you have babysitters. It's dead near impossible to get out of one level and promoted to another. I spent a month trying to prove I was capable of doing basic algebra so I didn't have to take the class. After that month, they gave me some kind of placement test and properly moved me up but still... there are plenty of situations where more than half a class are basically captive to teachers trying to educate people who either A.) can't learn or B.) don't want to or C.) both.

It's a shame, but 1/3 of students need to be in a day care (McDonald's Prep U), 1/3 need to be in classes like they are now, and 1/3 need to be in real classes where learning is an order of magnitude more difficult (or people expect a lot more out of you). Instead, we jam them all in one class and hope they all fair well.

For places with Honors systems or AP/CP or IB, it is better than the regular approach, but still very very lacking.

I will debate that statement and say that most teachers work their tails off and really care about their students. It is those few that don't that give the rest of us a bad name.

There are places that build the class roll around this and where that doesn't happen. As The Dude said, this is why differentiated instruction is so important and why many of the SPED/504 laws need to be revisited or amplified to help those students who fit in those categories as well as those that don't.

bsaza2358
09-30-2010, 10:38 AM
My old school district just changed its "tracking" curriculum. There used to be Honors/AP, then tracks 2-4, then remedial. All kids were tracked based on test results and grades the previous year. The curriculum for each track was tailored to the median abilities of the participants, and every 5 years, they would adjust things like books, criteria, etc. Each year, kids could move up or down based on parental request, teacher input, etc.

Now, they are having honors classes and everyone else. The situation described by The Dude is likely to be much more prevalent in high school situations. Remedial kids with above average kids. I don't agree with this change. Curious to see what the teachers think of that from an administrative perspective.

CJSchneider
09-30-2010, 12:41 PM
That process is known as "differentiated instruction". Each student in the class, regardless of their level, will be learning the same skill; how they do so will be different based on their academic level and thereby directed by the teacher through various activities taking place concurrently.

For example, in my Robotics class, I may be teaching a lesson on basic design. I will have one group with me, putting pieces together and letting them be "hands on". Another group is given a pre-selected set of parts and some graph paper and will be told to draw a diagram of how the parts will fit together in order to accomplish a certain function. A third group will be on the computers using special software where they can do a little of what both the other two groups are doing in a virtual setting. The end goal, however, will be for the student to understand what pieces are needed to accomplish certain goals and how those pieces function in relation to the rest of the pieces.

Shane P. Hallam
09-30-2010, 01:16 PM
My old school district just changed its "tracking" curriculum. There used to be Honors/AP, then tracks 2-4, then remedial. All kids were tracked based on test results and grades the previous year. The curriculum for each track was tailored to the median abilities of the participants, and every 5 years, they would adjust things like books, criteria, etc. Each year, kids could move up or down based on parental request, teacher input, etc.

Now, they are having honors classes and everyone else. The situation described by The Dude is likely to be much more prevalent in high school situations. Remedial kids with above average kids. I don't agree with this change. Curious to see what the teachers think of that from an administrative perspective.

As CJ said, it depends on how good the teachers are. If they can differentiate, it can be a very rewarding environment. If not, it could be to the detriment of the students.

vikes_28
09-30-2010, 01:55 PM
where are you in south dakota?

and follow your dreams. That's all we have at the end of the day that can't be taken from us.

Sioux Falls.

I am going for my generals for the next two years now. And after that I will decide what I want to do. If I teach high school, I want to teach something with a process, such as algebra or personal computing. My other option would be to get an early childhood education degree, and or a second language degree specializing in french so I can teach it in a High school.

Thanks for the advice guys. You've been really helpful and respectful.