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View Full Version : Controversy Over "Official" 40 Times


cajuncorey
03-01-2011, 12:46 PM
A big controversy last year was taylor mays unofficial 4.24 that was officially 4.43. This is a a difference of .19 which is huge. The nfl network compared the footage of his run with the fastest guys at the combine via "simucam" and he placed between trindon holliday (4.34 officially) and jacoby ford (4.28 officially) indicating that he should have timed on average a 4.31 but 4.43 is a long ways off.

From what i saw today was a kid Darryl "Buster" Skrine who clocked in with an unofficial 4.29 which was the best time seen. until i looked at the top performers on NFL.com and couldnt find him at the top of the list. When i scrolled down i found him to be clocked in at 4.48. again a 0.19 difference which is huge. now they havent simucamed this one yet but theres bound to be some controversy over it.

I begin to understand why the coaches bring their own stop watches so that they can get their own times.

But how much can these "Official" times be trusted though?

descendency
03-01-2011, 01:33 PM
They're trying to help Al Davis out. They're trying to stop him from taking a kid from the citadel in round 2.

PossibleCabbage
03-01-2011, 02:02 PM
Official times are really mostly for the league's record keeping, since the league decided that they wanted to keep combine records about ten years ago. Teams mostly go on their own times.

That being said, since the combine does keep times largely for the purpose of being able to say "look, this guy set a record!" it's entirely possible that Skrine was "disqualified" because I thought he was over the line on his start both times.

Teams won't care, honestly, but it matters for the league being able to maintain the integrity of their records.

Babylon
03-01-2011, 02:28 PM
QUOTE=cajuncorey;2539112]A big controversy last year was taylor mays unofficial 4.24 that was officially 4.43. This is a a difference of .19 which is huge. The nfl network compared the footage of his run with the fastest guys at the combine via "simucam" and he placed between trindon holliday (4.34 officially) and jacoby ford (4.28 officially) indicating that he should have timed on average a 4.31 but 4.43 is a long ways off.

From what i saw today was a kid Darryl "Buster" Skrine who clocked in with an unofficial 4.29 which was the best time seen. until i looked at the top performers on NFL.com and couldnt find him at the top of the list. When i scrolled down i found him to be clocked in at 4.48. again a 0.19 difference which is huge. now they havent simucamed this one yet but theres bound to be some controversy over it.

I begin to understand why the coaches bring their own stop watches so that they can get their own times.

But how much can these "Official" times be trusted though?[/QUOTE]

That is all you need to know about their so called official times, just go with the two on the field and take the best one, shouldnt be that difficult. They were exposed with the simulcast of the guys running the top 40s last year.

ElectricEye
03-01-2011, 03:05 PM
Honestly, the official times really don't mean much. All the teams use their own hand times anyway, so it's really just all up for us to argue about nothing. Having said that, the official times do seem to be a load of crap on occasion. We all saw exactly what happened last year with Taylor Mays and how subjective these things are apparently.

WCH
03-01-2011, 04:01 PM
A big controversy last year was taylor mays unofficial 4.24 that was officially 4.43. This is a a difference of .19 which is huge. The nfl network compared the footage of his run with the fastest guys at the combine via "simucam" and he placed between trindon holliday (4.34 officially) and jacoby ford (4.28 officially) indicating that he should have timed on average a 4.31 but 4.43 is a long ways off.


I can't say for sure, but that looks like a case of a data entry intern screwing up. The official time was probably supposed to be 4.34, but the intern got dyslexic for a second and typed 4.43.

This type of thing happens all of the time in data entry, unfortunately.