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View Full Version : NFLPA Tells Prospects To Boycott Draft


diabsoule
03-14-2011, 01:02 PM
The NFL Players Association is putting into place a plan that would prevent each top college prospect from attending next month's draft in New York, according to multiple league sources. The NFLPA already has contacted 17 top prospects that ordinarily would have received an invitation to attend the draft and informed them not to go.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/draft2011/news/story?id=6216135

This would definitely alter how the draft has previously been viewed since there may not be post-draft interviews and you won't get to watch the player stroll up to the podium during the first round.

descendency
03-14-2011, 01:05 PM
"Please come to our draft, but not our team facilities."

Hurricanes25
03-14-2011, 01:07 PM
This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for these players. I hope they go and enjoy it.

4U2NV
03-14-2011, 01:23 PM
I thought the NFLPA doesn't exist at the moment. How can they be making demands if they aren't even a union?

TACKLE
03-14-2011, 01:29 PM
I thought the NFLPA doesn't exist at the moment. How can they be making demands if they aren't even a union?

Great point.

Hurricanes25
03-14-2011, 01:32 PM
That is a great point but I think they still "exist", just not officially.

SchizophrenicBatman
03-14-2011, 01:34 PM
The NFLPA is a joke for doing this. Let the kids go and enjoy their moment in the sun. Oh no, the NFL will get good ratings! Wait...that would happen anyway

Roddoliver
03-14-2011, 01:35 PM
I don't think this kind of action will help the players' case in the court. Making schemes like that as if they were still a union. More ammo for the NFL to use the word "scam".

PossibleCabbage
03-14-2011, 01:38 PM
Honestly don't care. If this results in NFLN's coverage of the draft featuring less of Deion asking a guy "How do you feel now that you've been drafted?" and more of "Mayock breaking down tape"... this could be a very good thing.

Mostly this just means that the Networks covering the draft have to work harder in the next month and a half, but honestly? What else are the folks at NFLN going to do?

SchizophrenicBatman
03-14-2011, 01:38 PM
It honestly comes off as childish. Not showing up for the draft is petty and does nothing for them in the long run. If the kids (lead by Von Miller) decided to do this on their own as a show of solidarity, then that is another thing. But handing down some draconian order from an ex-union that was just fine with reducing their upcoming rookie contracts by a ton of $$$ doesn't help them at all

PossibleCabbage
03-14-2011, 01:47 PM
It's also worth noting that the NFLPA* really has no power whatsoever to compel prospects to boycott the draft. The NFLPA* doesn't represent these people.

Some will probably not show up, but others might. Can you imagine how much attention a prospective gloryseeking high pick would get from the media if he's one of 2-3 guys who actually showed up? If you like hearing your own name, I imagine that would be pretty appealing.

yourfavestoner
03-14-2011, 01:48 PM
I don't think this kind of action will help the players' case in the court. Making schemes like that as if they were still a union. More ammo for the NFL to use the word "scam".

The NFL can use the word "scam" all they want. The players decertified in 1989 and didn't recertify until 1993. The owners called it a sham back then and challenged it in court. They lost.

wonderbredd24
03-14-2011, 02:06 PM
The NFL can use the word "scam" all they want. The players decertified in 1989 and didn't recertify until 1993. The owners called it a sham back then and challenged it in court. They lost.
My understanding is that the Collective Bargaining Agreement which they were operating under when they opted to decertify explicitly allowed them to do so

FlyingElvis
03-14-2011, 02:12 PM
This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for these players. I hope they go and enjoy it.

The NFLPA is a joke for doing this. Let the kids go and enjoy their moment in the sun. Oh no, the NFL will get good ratings! Wait...that would happen anyway

I totally agree. Shame on them for even asking these kids to do so. It would have zero impact and would only serve to ruin what should be a thrilling time in a young man's life.

fear the elf
03-14-2011, 03:07 PM
I totally agree. Shame on them for even asking these kids to do so. It would have zero impact and would only serve to ruin what should be a thrilling time in a young man's life.

Exactly this. As a viewer, I actually don't like watching the painfully awkward interviews and whatnot, but let these kids go and enjoy themselves if they want. The NFLPA is putting them in an uncomfortable position in that if they go, they may not be as well received by their eventual teammates, but if they skip it, they miss a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. It's sad they would stoop to this really.

OzTitan
03-14-2011, 03:16 PM
They're not kids anymore they're becomming men of the NFL - may as well get down with the realities sooner rather than later, unless they plan to not be part of the union.

PoopSandwich
03-14-2011, 03:27 PM
This depends a whole lot on how much the current players want the rookies to boycott it... If you're the handful of guys that decide to actually go you're going to end up with a bad reputation already from the vets.

PossibleCabbage
03-14-2011, 03:32 PM
They're not kids anymore they're becomming men of the NFL - may as well get down with the realities sooner rather than later, unless they plan to not be part of the union.

Unless the courts agree with the NFL that the decertification is a sham (which it is), there is no union. Not only that, but when the players reform the union, there's no guarantee that the existing power structure would be in place. If things go very badly for D. Smith in the courts, it's entirely possible that the NFLPA going forward will just use him as a scapegoat and reform under new leadership and ignore past offenses for everybody else without malice.

So after the first legal tussle takes place, if the NFLPA* convinces judge Nelson that they are no longer a union (and thus eligible to sue), then there's absolutely nothing stopping anybody from Troy Vincent (the leading candidate for the job DeMaurice Smith actually got) to the Teamsters from organizing the vast majority of the players into a different union, and bargaining with the league. In fact, there's nothing saying that the players can't form a great number of unions.

Incoming rookies would be entirely justified (assuming the decertification goes though) for forming a union consisting solely of themselves. I could see why they might want to do that, considering that they're the people interested in preventing a rookie wage scale.

gpngc
03-14-2011, 03:33 PM
The NFLPA is not a union right now, but it is instead a trade association, which as far as I know, acts like a union.

I think this means that the top prospects are just going to decline to do anything for NFL Network, but will still appear on ESPN. I doubt the NFLPA will actually get the prospects to miss out on the experience. Is it even possible to envision a scenario in which we don't see Icon Newton's face on draft day?

In a weird way, this actually may be a good thing for the fans. Maybe they'll show more film rather than the same three highlights and three minute interviews of Vernon Davis crying.

BeerBaron
03-14-2011, 03:36 PM
This wouldn't bother me all that much. The players would still get selected, and that's the part I like. I don't need to see a bland interview of a highly drafted player saying how excited he is to go play on team X.

Plus, if this keeps ESPN from ruining the pick by showing the kid on the phone, I'll be happy. I HATE that. I don't want to know who the pick is until it comes out of the commissioners mouth.

Borat
03-14-2011, 04:23 PM
Classic.

"Hey incoming rookies, can you go ahead and not show up to the draft. It will really help us in our negotiations where we are totally going to devalue your first contract. Thanks.
-Your future union-mates"

D-Unit
03-14-2011, 04:30 PM
Right now Jake Locker is wishing he had declared last year. LMAO. Screwed outta millions.

yourfavestoner
03-14-2011, 04:37 PM
Right now Jake Locker is wishing he had declared last year. LMAO. Screwed outta millions.

I don't necessarily agree. Locker's draft stock was based mostly on projection and assumed development. His stock didn't really decline, it just failed to improve like everyone thought it would. Had he come out last year, he'd probably go anywhere from the middle of the first to the beginning of the second, which is where he's projected to go this year.

PossibleCabbage
03-14-2011, 04:38 PM
Right now Jake Locker is wishing he had declared last year. LMAO. Screwed outta millions.

If he declared last year, and went as high as he was expected to go he probably would have already been labeled a massive bust. By going back to school for a year, and showing his warts, he stands a much better chance of being drafted realistically and hence a much better chance of landing in a situation where you can succeed, and therefore earn a second (or third) contract.

Going super-high isn't always the best thing in the world, especially for quarterbacks.

Rabscuttle
03-14-2011, 04:58 PM
The highly sought after guys should all be part of a class action suit against the NFL anyhow. The agreement the NFL is trying to get the NFLPA to sign hurts these guys the most. They should inform the NFL that it is their intention to enter the NFL as unrestricted free agents.

D-Unit
03-14-2011, 04:59 PM
If he declared last year, and went as high as he was expected to go he probably would have already been labeled a massive bust. By going back to school for a year, and showing his warts, he stands a much better chance of being drafted realistically and hence a much better chance of landing in a situation where you can succeed, and therefore earn a second (or third) contract.

Going super-high isn't always the best thing in the world, especially for quarterbacks.
I guess there are a lot of ways we can all slice and dice it. I have a question though. Do you think Alex Smith and Jamarcus Russell would've been better off financially and career wise if they got picked lower in the draft? Would their 2nd contracts make up for what they would've missed being the #1 overall pick?

wonderbredd24
03-14-2011, 05:05 PM
I guess there are a lot of ways we can all slice and dice it. I have a question though. Do you think Alex Smith and Jamarcus Russell would've been better off financially and career wise if they got picked lower in the draft? Would their 2nd contracts make up for what they would've missed being the #1 overall pick?
JaMarcus Russell is broke... so yea.

You keep hammering this point and it is stupid. Jake Locker is happy with his decision. Who are you or anyone else to tell him how he should feel about it? What he values in his life is apparently quite different from what you and maybe a vast majority of people value.

You choose to define this kid based on what he might have gotten in his contract last year. Evidently, he thought his senior year, earning his degree, playing that football season and developing, and in his mind 'finishing what he started' there was more valuable to him than the money he would have gotten in his rookie deal last year.

The ignorance in this is overwhelming.

D-Unit
03-14-2011, 05:06 PM
I don't necessarily agree. Locker's draft stock was based mostly on projection and assumed development. His stock didn't really decline, it just failed to improve like everyone thought it would. Had he come out last year, he'd probably go anywhere from the middle of the first to the beginning of the second, which is where he's projected to go this year.
I commonly hear this suggestion from supporters of Locker's decision to go back. I personally don't buy it. He was being talked about by scouts as a Top 5 pick and could've arguably gone before Bradford. We can't know for sure now, but that goes both ways. Both sides of the argument will never know.

As for the NFLPA's suggestion for players in this draft? I think it's a ridiculous strong arm tactic and I think the players in general are just being stupid. For one, they think they deserve as much as the owners. Screw that. They did not invest as much as the owners did in order to be looked at as equals. They are pawns in the game and they need to be recognize that their pay is more than enough. If anything, I think the money should be more balanced among the good players and the average players. Good players make way too much and the average players don't make enough. The bad players? Screw them.

LizardState
03-14-2011, 05:43 PM
The NFLPA is a joke for doing this. Let the kids go and enjoy their moment in the sun. Oh no, the NFL will get good ratings! Wait...that would happen anyway

Not if none of the draftees show up.

That's their whole point.

It would amuse me to no end to tune into ESPN for the draft & watch Kiper, McShay Mortensen, Berman & the boys pontificate for 3 days on what would've happened had they actually had a draft with real draftees :--J

BeerBaron
03-14-2011, 05:47 PM
Not if none of the draftees show up.

That's their whole point.

I, and I doubt very few others, watch it to see the prospects on the stage. I couldn't care less if none of them were there....in fact I may prefer it for the reasons in my previous post.

They won't ruin the pick by showing the kid on the phone, and they won't waste valuable evaluation time asking the kid stupid questions about how he feels and dumb **** like that. Of course he's going to be excited.

SchizophrenicBatman
03-14-2011, 05:48 PM
I don't watch the draft for the 5 seconds of seeing the kid walk up to the podium and take a picture with a jersey or the terrible interviews. I expect few others do either

The only thing we'll miss if this happens is Blaine Gabbert sitting awkwardly in the green room as he falls to the late first round

Trogdor
03-14-2011, 05:51 PM
Not if none of the draftees show up.

That's their whole point.

You are completely right! If I'm watching the draft and don't get to watch the 1st pick in the draft smile and shake Goodell's hand I'm just going to turn it off and not bother watching the rest of the draft.

On a serious note... how can this be confused as a good idea? I hope that this rookie class is a little smarter than to the sacrifice the feeling of having your name called for a group of people screaming for your pay cut. NFLPA is a tad out of touch. This time last year both sides were telling us how none of this would be possible without the fans and how they will continue to do what's right by us.

yourfavestoner
03-14-2011, 06:01 PM
You are completely right! If I'm watching the draft and don't get to watch the 1st pick in the draft smile and shake Goodell's hand I'm just going to turn it off and not bother watching the rest of the draft.

On a serious note... how can this be confused as a good idea? I hope that this rookie class is a little smarter than to the sacrifice the feeling of having your name called for a group of people screaming for your pay cut. NFLPA is a tad out of touch. This time last year both sides were telling us how none of this would be possible without the fans and how they will continue to do what's right by us.

Anybody who does - or has ever - believed that is blissfully naive. Both sides, players and owners, want the same thing: as much money as they can get. Where does that money come from? Fans.

LizardState
03-14-2011, 06:08 PM
Apologies, I should've differentiated.

Invited draftees might respond to the awkward situation by not coming as invited to the draft, but the PA is calling for a total boycott by the hundreds of draft eligible college players, something I can't see happening in any way, shape or form.

Too bad they banned sniper yesterday, I think he might have had a poignant opinion on a draft boycott.

Complex
03-14-2011, 06:16 PM
They should go to the draft and not shake Roger Goodell hand. They could also pretend they are going to shake Goodell handand then pull away at the last second.

ATLDirtyBirds
03-14-2011, 06:39 PM
This wouldn't bother me all that much. The players would still get selected, and that's the part I like. I don't need to see a bland interview of a highly drafted player saying how excited he is to go play on team X.

Plus, if this keeps ESPN from ruining the pick by showing the kid on the phone, I'll be happy. I HATE that. I don't want to know who the pick is until it comes out of the commissioners mouth.

This, this, this. It might actually be for the best. But don't ruin it for the kids. Let them enjoy their moment.

Monomach
03-14-2011, 08:07 PM
They should go to the draft and not shake Roger Goodell hand. They could also pretend they are going to shake Goodell handand then pull away at the last second.
If a player does the missed-handshake-turned-into-running-hand-over-hair thing from all those 80s movies, I'm buying his jersey.

YJMK4UebZVs

D-Unit
03-14-2011, 09:04 PM
JaMarcus Russell is broke... so yea.

You keep hammering this point and it is stupid. Jake Locker is happy with his decision. Who are you or anyone else to tell him how he should feel about it? What he values in his life is apparently quite different from what you and maybe a vast majority of people value.

You choose to define this kid based on what he might have gotten in his contract last year. Evidently, he thought his senior year, earning his degree, playing that football season and developing, and in his mind 'finishing what he started' there was more valuable to him than the money he would have gotten in his rookie deal last year.

The ignorance in this is overwhelming.
No, the one who's ignorance is overwhelming is you because you think Jake Locker losing millions is ok. The one who is ignorant is the one who believes he's gonna be a great NFL QB and that his second contract will be like hitting the lottery. I don't define him, he defines himself and the definition so far is pure stupidity. He went back knowing he had a lot to lose and sure enough, he LOST IT.

I don't watch the draft for the 5 seconds of seeing the kid walk up to the podium and take a picture with a jersey or the terrible interviews. I expect few others do either

The only thing we'll miss if this happens is Blaine Gabbert sitting awkwardly in the green room as he falls to the late first round
It will be even more painful/hilarious if they invite Locker to the green room.

DBNYDP
03-14-2011, 10:33 PM
Considering that he has slipped from a (top 10 pick?) to probably out of the first round, and that there will be a rookie wage scale in place when he signs...I'd say he lost a lot.

I can't guarantee you anything but I think he like many other QBs wished he had that back.

PossibleCabbage
03-14-2011, 10:37 PM
Why did this thread turn into a thread about Jake Locker? Seriously?

Bucs_Rule
03-14-2011, 10:49 PM
What does players showing up live at the draft or not have to do with the negotiations? Nothing.

My guess is they want to embarrass NFL and lower ratings. Even if ratings go down a tiny bit and sponsors give less money, which don't see happening. That is less money that the players would get as well.

It is cool seeing players introduced at the draft with the jerseys. The reaction when a player is drafted is much better when their at the parties they host then live.

Live players and family are happy though often reserved compared to the huge cheering that happens at the parties.

TonyGfortheTD
03-15-2011, 01:03 AM
It shows that the incoming rookies are united with the rest of the players in their battle against the league.

Why should the NFLPA feel compelled to be perfectly fine with the league doing PR sessions with players, when they feel the owners are trying to screw them over?

Honestly, I think this move will make the draft more watchable. Instead of panning to the kids getting a phone call before the selection actually comes it, we could be surprised for a change.

wonderbredd24
03-15-2011, 07:28 AM
What a surprise... D-Unit deleting my post which only furthers my point

J-Mike88
03-15-2011, 07:53 AM
Plus, if this keeps ESPN from ruining the pick by showing the kid on the phone, I'll be happy. I HATE that. I don't want to know who the pick is until it comes out of the commissioners mouth.
^ This exactly ^

Hey, how about the NFL screws the NFLPA over this.... can you imagine if DeMaurice's posse gets all the prospects to boycot the draft, and the NFL just postpones the draft for a year because of the union de-certifying and pulling that antic?
Think that would make Smith look like an ******. He'd immediately look neuterized. And it would make Andrew Luck look like a genius.

Let this years crop of draft-eligible players sit out a year, go Maurice Clarett.
Or go ahead and play in the UFL or CFL for a fraction of the money.

The NFLPA wants to play hardball, I'd love to see the NFL play hardball back x10 and shove it up the NFLPA's *ss.

FlyingElvis
03-15-2011, 08:31 AM
Why the hell would the NFL decide to lose the revenue associated with the draft and the clubs forfeit their opportunity to draft top talent? None of that even makes any sense. Cutting off the nose to spite the face.

Shane P. Hallam
03-15-2011, 08:40 AM
Why the hell would the NFL decide to lose the revenue associated with the draft and the clubs forfeit their opportunity to draft top talent? None of that even makes any sense. Cutting off the nose to spite the face.

They wouldn't, that's what the NFLPA wants.

Brent
03-15-2011, 09:01 AM
I don't define him, he defines himself and the definition so far is pure stupidity. He went back knowing he had a lot to lose and sure enough, he LOST IT.
No, you are making an assumption about him being stupid when it's entirely likely that he, unlike you, may not be money-obsessed. It's possible that he realized that he would get a chance to play in the NFL and, looking at history, even a backup makes unbelievable amounts of money. Hell, he may have felt that he was not ready to move on to the next stage of his life. Or maybe he was brainwashed by ******* aliens. You have no idea what a 21 year old kid is thinking in that position, and it's pretty goddamn irrelevant, anyway. To assume that he is "stupid" because he didn't do what you think he should have done is absurd. By this logic, anyone who doesn't live how you think they should is "stupid".

To bring that back to the topic, I say let the guys go and have their moment.

Brothgar
03-15-2011, 10:03 AM
How great would it be if the players boycotted the draft? No closeups of players on the phone. No post pick interviews and more analysis. I like the idea.

Roddoliver
03-15-2011, 10:45 AM
The fans can make an impact and decide not to watch the draft on TV. Which won't happen anyway.

vidae
03-15-2011, 11:02 AM
The incoming draftees deserve their moments in New York. It's a big step and an honor if you're invited.

LizardState
03-15-2011, 11:20 AM
Why the hell would the NFL decide to lose the revenue associated with the draft and the clubs forfeit their opportunity to draft top talent? None of that even makes any sense. Cutting off the nose to spite the face.

It's a slick move by wily veteran players to eliminate younger rookies from the NFL or taking their jobs.

Bucs_Rule
03-15-2011, 02:24 PM
It shows that the incoming rookies are united with the rest of the players in their battle against the league.

Why should the NFLPA feel compelled to be perfectly fine with the league doing PR sessions with players, when they feel the owners are trying to screw them over?

Honestly, I think this move will make the draft more watchable. Instead of panning to the kids getting a phone call before the selection actually comes it, we could be surprised for a change.

PR moves for the league helps players. The more angry fans get the more likely they are to not buy tickets. So if PR moves makes the league look a little better and sell tickets then players get their piece of the buy.

People talk about PR battle like winning helps their side. If people blame players fans are less likely to buy tickets to see people they are angry with, so owners make less money. People blame owners so they are less likely to buy tickets from owners. Players make less. Their spending time trying to lose more money.

I don't see how it increases chances to get a better deal if you make other side look bad as their your both selling the same product.

I do agree it will probably make it more watchable. I'm sure NFL Network and ESPN will have people their to talk to top prospects and have jerseys and hats to hand out.

Day One Pick
03-15-2011, 04:18 PM
Won't this ironically save the league money? I doubt the top prospects have to foot the bill to be at the draft if they are invited...way to go NFLPA. This only hurts the prospects by taking away a once in a lifetime opportunity that very few people ever get. They make themselves look ridiculous, and like I mentioned likely save the league some money. Do people watch/go to the draft because a few prospects are there, or do they watch/go to see the draft outcome? The outcome still will happen...

Rabscuttle
03-15-2011, 05:43 PM
It's a slick move by wily veteran players to eliminate younger rookies from the NFL or taking their jobs.

If the NFL general managers got together and blacklisted players for not attending the draft, how much do you think the collusion case would cost them?

Start with three times Bradford's contract just for whoever can make a case that he would have went number one. That would be a pittance in the overall scheme of these lawsuits.)

J-Mike88
03-16-2011, 09:48 AM
Right now Jake Locker is wishing he had declared last year. LMAO. Screwed outta millions.
Good call, There's NO doubt about that.

J-Mike88
03-16-2011, 09:53 AM
The incoming draftees deserve their moments in New York. It's a big step and an honor if you're invited.
Joe Thomas might not agree.