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View Full Version : Are NFL players obligated do being role models for the public eye?


Ness
11-08-2011, 08:45 AM
It seems to be the trade off. Most of the players are millionaires. It's hard to argue that you should have common sense and not do stupid things like beating up your girlfriend or getting a DUI. The NFL wants to control players lives, but at the same time I can't feel that bad for a lot of these players and I do believe that they have to be held to a higher standard because they are playing for a business that is constantly in the spotlight and wants to put on a positive image at all costs.

Do you think the NFL goes too far in controlling these players and making sure they stay marketable and out of trouble?

I mean if I'm a young guy I still think I should be able to go to a strip club every once in a while or a bar. I guess the risk you take is that if you go to those places with certain people, drama could start or whatever. Even if nothing happens to you or you didn't do anything, news comes out that you are at a strip club and then that looks bad...apparently.

Gay Ork Wang
11-08-2011, 09:11 AM
I do not think they should be role models.

But if the NFL as a business thinks, that stuff like that hurts the marketability of their league or could make them look bad they are absolutely allowed to implement rules.

AHungryWalrus
11-08-2011, 09:13 AM
Thing is, parents should explain this to their kids.

"Look, Billy. Michael Vick is famous because he can run really fast and throw really far. Not because he is smart, caring, compassionate, or anything that makes for a good human being."

I mean. How often was the most athletic kid in school a huge asswipe? Did you want to be HIM?

Anyways, clearly my answer is no. They're not role models. They are huge guys who get paid for being able to do things no one else can. You want role models, go see a politician.

Oh, wait.

Rosebud
11-08-2011, 09:26 AM
To be honest I'll be disappointed if my future kids' role models are all athletes. Not saying it's not good to have one or two athletes to look up to, as Oliver Kahn and Patrick Roy's obsessions with succeeding were huge for me, but I'd hope my future kids are smarter than that and can pick better role models than 99.9% of NFL athletes

Splat
11-08-2011, 09:32 AM
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BeerBaron
11-08-2011, 09:47 AM
no idea why the question is 'are they obligated to be' when the simple fact is that they are. as such, the nfl has a direct, monetary interest in making sure that what they're selling stays, well, sellable.

This. It does not matter in the slightest whether they ought to be or are obligated to be...they just are.

tjsunstein
11-08-2011, 09:53 AM
In no way are they obligated to be role models. So many players have disregarded that sentiment already. Vick, Stallworth, etc are back in the league. If they were obligated then they would never be reinstated. They're obligated to accept the consequences for their actions as everyone should be.

mqtirishfan
11-08-2011, 11:09 AM
Aren't they contractually obligated to be role models these days? They have to attend team functions that are often charitable, have behavior clauses to not get in trouble, etc.

Halsey
11-08-2011, 11:31 AM
Nobody is obliged to set a good example. If you want to be an idiot, have at it. If I want to criticize you for it, there's not really much you can do about it. The NFL is controlled by what the masses want. Most of the masses don't want to watch idiots.

phlysac
11-08-2011, 03:47 PM
If it were up to me (obviously it isn't) it would be expected of ALL people to role-model behaviors. But then again, I'm a youth counselor so it's kind of expected.

CC.SD
11-08-2011, 03:50 PM
How can you be a role model when you ignore everything you were ever taught about blocking on the outside>

http://cdn.ksk.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/nachoole.gif

niel89
11-08-2011, 04:02 PM
no idea why the question is 'are they obligated to be' when the simple fact is that they are. as such, the nfl has a direct, monetary interest in making sure that what they're selling stays, well, sellable.

This. No matter what your opinion is, the players are role models. Part of the reason they get paid so much is because they are public figures. It comes with the territory.

Raiderz4Life
11-08-2011, 04:04 PM
Don't think I've ever seen a QB be coached up how to block.

Saints-Tigers
11-08-2011, 05:05 PM
They shouldn't have to be. The NFL should market the guys that are clearly role model material maybe, or the parents should deify those guys.

To each his own, a player has no obligation to be not douchey. Don't like him? Don't pay for the product... simple.

AHungryWalrus
11-08-2011, 11:22 PM
This. No matter what your opinion is, the players are role models. Part of the reason they get paid so much is because they are public figures. It comes with the territory.

Umm. The entire reason they get paid is because they are good at football.

Or am I missing something in how Pacman Jones keeps getting signed... Aqib Talib was never cut... etc.

If you're a good player, you'll get paid, assuming you haven't been tossed from the league entirely.

Being a public figure does not make you a role model. Marilyn Manson is a public figure. Eminem is. Yet parents manage to teach their kids that simply selling records doesn't make you something to emulate.

Anyways. I seem to remember, as a kid, seeing a difference between being Patrick Roy the goalie and Patrick Roy the person, and simply him being a good goalie did not make him a good person. But, I guess, I am a genius.

descendency
11-08-2011, 11:32 PM
Whether they want to be or not, they are. Whether we want them to be or not, they are. You can argue that their influence isn't directly felt (like how some athletes make careers by taking PEDs which forces others to do so to compete which in turn presents an image to high school kids making them feel like they have to take them), but they aren't just collecting a check to play a game.

I don't think they are role models like parents are, but they definitely do have some impact. Ultimately, I still believe a child is most heavily affected by the every day adults and not the ones that they see on TV.

Most kids (that I've seen) imitate something on some level. Like when they see LeBron get away with not shaking hands on the court, they feel like they should be able to as well. That doesn't mean they will be poor sports in everything they do.

edit: Parents can't be everything and teach what is right in every situation. Humans tend to emulate what they see in certain situations, whether it be a role model or an actor in a movie. Thinking on your feet is hard so we take the lazy way out.

AHungryWalrus
11-08-2011, 11:38 PM
I was unaware we were arguing over whether or not they impacted kids. Of course they do. So do video games. The Simpsons. Commercials. The radio.

As well as every single part of commercialized society.

So?

Are all of those things obligated to provide a good influence since they ARE an influence?

wogitalia
11-08-2011, 11:38 PM
How has no one mentioned the title of this thread...

This is why are Obligated do being...

Seriously though, athletes are role models and they are very well compensated in part to be role models.

The fact is that a large part of what makes an athlete is a great example for children(and adults). They are generally hard working, dedicated, fit(perhaps the biggest of the lot) and competitive. All of which are good traits to have or work towards having.

The parents/adults role is to differentiate between their good traits and their bad traits and encourage the emulation of the good attributes and discourage the bad. Just like movie stars are generally in good shape also and are charismatic and often funny.

If you have a kid then you encourage them to want to be built like Vick, want to win like Vick, to work as hard as Vick has to be where he is, you discourage a lot of things he does but that is just parenting.

Ness
11-09-2011, 12:13 AM
How has no one mentioned the title of this thread...

This is why are Obligated do being...

Seriously though, athletes are role models and they are very well compensated in part to be role models.

The fact is that a large part of what makes an athlete is a great example for children(and adults). They are generally hard working, dedicated, fit(perhaps the biggest of the lot) and competitive. All of which are good traits to have or work towards having.

The parents/adults role is to differentiate between their good traits and their bad traits and encourage the emulation of the good attributes and discourage the bad. Just like movie stars are generally in good shape also and are charismatic and often funny.

If you have a kid then you encourage them to want to be built like Vick, want to win like Vick, to work as hard as Vick has to be where he is, you discourage a lot of things he does but that is just parenting.
But what about things like what happened to Gronkowski? He gets blasted for having his photo taken with a porn star. Like really, you can't do that? Can you go to strip clubs on the weekends? Can you throw massive parties? There is a really blurry line between what you can and can't do as a young man it seems. As long as you aren't hurting anyone I don't see what the problem is. Just seems like these guys once they get into the NFL are expected to be perfect little angels. Just because someone goes to a strip club or has their photo taken with a porn star doesn't make them a bad person.

wogitalia
11-09-2011, 12:21 AM
But what about things like what happened to Gronkowski? He gets blasted for having his photo taken with a porn star. Like really, you can't do that? Can you go to strip clubs on the weekends? Can you throw massive parties? There is a really blurry line between what you can and can't do as a young man it seems. As long as you aren't hurting anyone I don't see what the problem is. Just seems like these guys once they get into the NFL are expected to be perfect little angels. Just because someone goes to a strip club or has their photo taken with a porn star doesn't make them a bad person.

The Gronkowski one was utter tripe. There are always going to be idiotic vocal minorities looking for a pot to stir and unfortunately NFL players are easy targets and really, I don't think there were many reasonable people who cared at all about that, look at the articles and every "expert comment" comes from some idiot affiliated with Christian Unity for Healthy Families or some other borderline made up foundation of stupidity. He apologised because that was the easy option.

Strip clubs are interesting, players don't get in trouble for going to them, generally it's because they, or someone they are with, do something stupid whilst there. I mean I've been to strip clubs north of 20 times in my life and never had any kind of incident. So really here I guess the question becomes why are they getting in trouble here and comes back to those elements that you don't encourage your children to emulate.

I do see your point though, Gronk is a great example of modern society and the amount of unemployed people with a vendetta and too much time. He is just a great example of do gooders gone bad. Remember there are people out there that have some pretty old school beliefs, people who have nothing better to do than to complain, personally I feel sorry for those people and really, I'd encourage my son(if I had one) to affiliate with pretty girls as much as possible, for mine that is one of the things about athletes that I would encourage, whilst telling a daughter to stay the hell away from them!