PDA

View Full Version : What's the hardest position to play?


Victory X
03-20-2012, 10:54 PM
Discuss.....

Mufasa
03-20-2012, 10:56 PM
Quarterback. Case closed, next question.

SickwithIt1010
03-20-2012, 10:56 PM
1) Qb
2) Qb
3) Qb
4) Qb



4223) Qb

Splat
03-20-2012, 11:00 PM
Agreed. A better question would be "besides QB what's the hardest position to play."

hawkeye123
03-20-2012, 11:01 PM
Besides quarterback, i'd say corner

fenikz
03-20-2012, 11:04 PM
Physically I would say RB

niel89
03-20-2012, 11:05 PM
QB by far. The mental side of it is incredibly complex in addition to the physical part. I couldn't imagine trying to read a defense while avoiding a real pass rush and then having to deliver an accurate pass to a WR 15 yards down field.

I think that CB is the second hardest now days just because of the physical requirements in height/speed/fluidity. WR's are huge and fast and know where they are going presnap. And now you can't even touch them with out a PI call.

Caddy
03-20-2012, 11:06 PM
Alright who voted for kicker/punter?

niel89
03-20-2012, 11:08 PM
Alright who voted for kicker/punter?

Do you know how hard it is for Seabass to stay sober for an entire game?

Samson907
03-20-2012, 11:15 PM
Man to man corner and quarterback i think are pretty even to be honest

Matthew Jones
03-20-2012, 11:21 PM
It's QB but I picked safety since the position seriously lacks a lot of talent there.

Brodeur
03-20-2012, 11:22 PM
apparently everyone.

http://i48.tinypic.com/s67k09.gif

diabsoule
03-20-2012, 11:24 PM
http://i48.tinypic.com/s67k09.gif

Go ahead and say it... You were just waiting for a chance to use that gif

Don Vito
03-20-2012, 11:27 PM
Agreed. A better question would be "besides QB what's the hardest position to play."

This, and my answer would probably be corner. You look at every position in the NFL and look at who each player goes up against and you have to think "how the hell do these guys do what they do?"

I wouldn't the specialists, but we tend to undervalue players like running backs or thumping linebackers in the "new NFL". Thinking about the pounding that those guys go through it is incredible that they last more than one season.

Brodeur
03-20-2012, 11:27 PM
Go ahead and say it... You were just waiting for a chance to use that gif

I may have been.

Sloopy
03-20-2012, 11:32 PM
Other than QB:

This is going to come down to a safety vs CB argument. Depending on the system, it can be both.

Safeties generally have more responsibility in the run game than a CB, a good cover safety can mask a patchwork CB corps and with the advent of the more athletic TE (in some systems) a good safety can do wonders for your defense.

However, the CB must cover a wide variety of WR types, from the short speedsters to the long gliding deep-threats and everywhere in between. Very few are good at covering every type of receiver. The ability to keep receivers covered for a second longer can help your pass rush and may be the difference between a sack and a completion.

It's tough to say but I would venture to say that it is one of those two.

I lean towards the safety side as there are so few safeties who excel at every facet of being a safety while there are a number of CBs who I would say are true "#1 types"

Brothgar
03-20-2012, 11:39 PM
I'd say 4-3 MLB is the hardest position because you need many more skill sets than any other position. MLBs need to read the offense pre-snap , tackle, cover, read and react, as well as shed blocks

gpngc
03-20-2012, 11:40 PM
It's by far and away CB after QB.

49erNation85
03-20-2012, 11:57 PM
Lamo wtf people voting for k/p idiots . just kidding.

Lil Quip
03-21-2012, 12:03 AM
I voted QB, but I think that is the easy way out. They touch the ball basically every offensive play. Other than a center making the line calls, they do a ton of pre snap stuff. And that isn't even accounting for what they do during a play.

Non QB? Easily safety for me, especially FS. Corner is difficult, but scheme can play to a player's strengths. Coordinators can put guys in man or zone. There can be safety help over the top. They don't have to blow up the running game. Being a shutdown corner is tremendously difficult, but playing at the highest level is not essential. There aren't a ton of players in NFL history that can play corner at a true shutdown level. However, there are a lot of serviceable corners.

As players get bigger and faster, there should be plenty of players with the range of skills and size to make some really good free safeties. Yet were the heck are they? A great FS has to be a center fielder and a good at tackling. There is a distinct reason reason that Ed Reed in the twilight of his career is still considered the best FS in the NFL right now. A great FS has to see and survey the field similar to a QB.

vidae
03-21-2012, 12:12 AM
I voted for Punter. You got a problem with that?

K Train
03-21-2012, 12:23 AM
i think its CB personally, if you get noticed everyone hates you.

QB is an easy choice, i feel for the corners though...at least QBs get the glory with the position. its the most important position, not the hardest

wogitalia
03-21-2012, 12:30 AM
I've played every position except for OG...

I'd say QB was by far the hardest, you are so reliant on so many others and yet still have to do as much as anyone else individually.

After that I found S/CB to be the most difficult, CB everything is stacked against you, safety you need to make so many reads.

DL is for the most part very easy, LB has far easier reads and assignments than safety.

RB is probably the easiest position to play(also the most fun!).

K and P are obviously easy to do, not as easy to be good at though :)

C is a hard position as well, have to make reads, have to snap and get your head up before getting belted.

WR can be difficult with a poor QB, mostly from a mental standpoint, but is fundamentally an "easy" position.

yo123
03-21-2012, 12:34 AM
QB is obviously the hardest. Now that we have that out of the way.....

CB/safety are both underrated in this poll but at this point in time in the NFL everyone knows how important they are. There are so many freakish WR's in the league right now where it's basically impossible to stay with them step for step. Hell, there are so many freakish #2 receivers that you need to be pretty ****** good to contain them.

OL is being underrated in this poll. How many physical beasts do we see as DL's come in the draft year after year? That's because if you are a regular contributor as a D-lineman in the NFL you are either a physical freak or have a ridiculous motor and both are difficult to defend.

descendency
03-21-2012, 01:12 AM
You can hide weakness and strengths of any player in any system, except kickers. You can either kick the ball or you can't. The punter is standing 10 yards behind everyone, all alone. And no one ever remembers good punts. They always remember the shanks and the times when the returner takes it back on you. It's always the punters fault that the gunner didn't tackle the guy 60 yards down field.

Imagine trying to throw a rocket down field 30 yards into a tire. Now imagine having to do it twice as far with your foot.

Rosebud
03-21-2012, 02:35 AM
Long-snapper

FUNBUNCHER
03-21-2012, 03:03 AM
Corner is the hardest.
Every starting corner IMO could start at FS in the NFL, very few safeties can play corner. Fans undervalue how difficult it is to check someone who's running at you and still find the football in the air and make a defensive play on it.

From a cardiovascular standpoint, cornerbacks are the best conditioned athletes on the football field, because they have to be.
Corners are expected to make plays literally at every level of the football field; blitzing the QB and able to cover a speed WR 80 yards downfield in man coverage.

QB is the easy answer to this question, probably the right one IMO.
But when you really study what it takes to be a good NFL corner, there's a reason why the very best are among the highest paid players in the game.

Caulibflower
03-21-2012, 03:42 AM
Physically I would say RB

Right. If you're saying "toughest" I'm thinking the physical aspect of the game. In that regard, it's certainly not the quarterback. They're next to specialists on that totem pole. Running backs get hit every time a play goes to them. They have to block players much, much larger than themselves sprinting at them full speed around the edge in pass protection. The size disparities between the player and the person they're hitting, and frequency with which that occurs is highest for running backs in both cases. Runners have to compensate either by being so freakishly athletically gifted they don't get hit, or tough enough that it doesn't matter. Obviously, most are some combination of the two.

Sloopy
03-21-2012, 04:23 AM
Can I change my vote to "back up place kick holder"?

Timbathia
03-21-2012, 04:26 AM
It is easily kicker. QBs get about 80 snaps a game and all they have to do is lead the offense to 3 tds. Kickers get a few chances a game, and typically get one in every two games when the entire game is on the line. If they make it they are doing their job, nothing more, and if they miss they are a fucken muppet.

Way more pressure, and without even being in the game for the majority of time. Plus, they have stupid holders that dont put it laces out.

FUNBUNCHER
03-21-2012, 08:04 AM
It is easily kicker. QBs get about 80 snaps a game and all they have to do is lead the offense to 3 tds. Kickers get a few chances a game, and typically get one in every two games when the entire game is on the line. If they make it they are doing their job, nothing more, and if they miss they are a fucken muppet.

Way more pressure, and without even being in the game for the majority of time. Plus, they have stupid holders that dont put it laces out.

Most pressure doesn't equal hardest position to play.

Steady Lurkin
03-21-2012, 10:20 AM
Corner is the hardest.
Every starting corner IMO could start at FS in the NFL, very few safeties can play corner. Fans undervalue how difficult it is to check someone who's running at you and still find the football in the air and make a defensive play on it.

From a cardiovascular standpoint, cornerbacks are the best conditioned athletes on the football field, because they have to be.
Corners are expected to make plays literally at every level of the football field; blitzing the QB and able to cover a speed WR 80 yards downfield in man coverage.

QB is the easy answer to this question, probably the right one IMO.
But when you really study what it takes to be a good NFL corner, there's a reason why the very best are among the highest paid players in the game.

From a skillset standpoint, sure, but there are plenty of safeties who are already bad enough at understanding pursuit angles and can't tackle worth a crap. That problem just gets exacerbated at safety.

If we're talking about the most physically demanding position, I'll throw out a darkhorse with right guard. Right guard is the most unprotected of the offensive linemen due to defensive alignment - eg. the right guard has more unprotected one-on-one blocking in pass pro than most of the other offensive linemen (and it's usually against really good 3-techs). Left guards usually get more of the glamor because they tend to have better feet for pulling in the run game, but the RG has a really, really demanding position in terms of help he receives.

Saints-Tigers
03-21-2012, 12:29 PM
As a guy who played DB, safety is MUCH easier and less pressure filled than corner.

I mean, it sort of depends on your system, but covering a guy 1 on 1 is hard enough, and you can lock him down all game, but if you make one slip, and he goes all the way, you're the goat of the team.

Think about who gets the most hate from fans? Bad QBs and bad CBs.

NY+Giants=NYG
03-21-2012, 01:29 PM
From my experience on the offensive side of the ball, it has to be QB in my opinion.

Sloopy
03-21-2012, 05:11 PM
As a guy who played DB, safety is MUCH easier and less pressure filled than corner.

I mean, it sort of depends on your system, but covering a guy 1 on 1 is hard enough, and you can lock him down all game, but if you make one slip, and he goes all the way, you're the goat of the team.

Think about who gets the most hate from fans? Bad QBs and bad CBs.

Again it depends on your system but when I played (and I believe that many systems work similarly to this) it was the safeties job to prevent the big play.

Just one more thing that added to it.

Still both are difficult, I played both and have an affinity for both positions as well as a great deal of respect for those who play there; again, neither are easy and I feel it's kind of a toss up

Saints-Tigers
03-21-2012, 06:03 PM
Preventing the big play is a lot easier when it's your responsibility as a safety. Sitting back in a deep zone and having everything in front of you is way easier to me than manning up with a dominant receiver.

Sloopy
03-21-2012, 06:15 PM
Preventing the big play is a lot easier when it's your responsibility as a safety. Sitting back in a deep zone and having everything in front of you is way easier to me than manning up with a dominant receiver.

You also have to remember that CBs aren't even in man coverage on every play, nor do they always man up on a dominant WR every play.

Again, it depends on scheme. Playing CB in a cover two isn't nearly as hard as being a safety in a cover two. Hence why the corners are not as important in such a scheme.

Still, when your a corner in man press on a cover 0, if the blitz doesn't get there you can be rather exposed.

I will say that being confident in your safety over the top makes it a lot easier on you as a corner in man coverage (If your safeties are playing over the top).

Then again the same can be said for the safety. Having a great corner can allow you to shade your coverage slightly to one side.

It all depends on scheme and even individual plays within a scheme.

End of the day, if you have good corners you play to your strength. Same thing if you have good safeties.

Thunder&Lightning
03-21-2012, 06:41 PM
This thread is childish...

TheFinisher
03-21-2012, 07:29 PM
There are so many different schemes out there that it's almost impossible to answer this, positions aren't universal anymore. For instance take the Bears and what they ask Brian Urlacher to do in the Tampa 2. Not only is he asked to be the tackling machine in their defense in the running game, but he also has the pass coverage responsibilities of a deep safety... lining up at about 5 yards from the LOS. Think about how hard it is to first recognize it's a pass and react, open up and sprint 15-20, sometimes 30 yards towards the deep middle, all while keeping his eyes on the 2 inside receivers waiting for them to declare their routes... and having to do a 180 turn and run if the designated deep receiver is on the opposite side of where he opened up to originally. AND THEN make a play on the ball when you read the QB's going to throw at him. How many MLBs can even run vertically with slot receivers 30 yards downfield?

I understand QB is by far the most mentally demanding, but outside of that I'd say Urlacher in his defense throughout his career has individually had the toughest job in the NFL. You need to be an insanely athletic LB to succeed in the Tampa 2, and he takes it to another level by also being an absolute beast in the running game. Because of the pass responsibilities most MLBs in that D are anxious to bail out because they're afraid of getting beat deep, which results in being less active/aggressive in the running game. Urlacher is just so athletic that he knows he can afford that extra second to really commit to reading run/pass and still be able to get behind those receivers. It's insane.

Monomach
03-21-2012, 08:38 PM
The hardest position to play is the one being backed up by Tim Tebow. You have to read billboards and hear constant chants asking for you to be fired.

Timbathia
03-21-2012, 08:39 PM
Most pressure doesn't equal hardest position to play.

I was kidding, but whatever.

Hurricanes25
03-21-2012, 09:10 PM
QB is #1. Man to man corner has to be #2.

FUNBUNCHER
03-21-2012, 10:57 PM
There are so many different schemes out there that it's almost impossible to answer this. For instance take the Bears and what they ask Brian Urlacher to do in the Tampa 2. Not only is he asked to be the tackling machine in their defense in the running game, but he also has the pass coverage responsibilities of a deep safety... lining up at about 5 yards from the LOS. Think about how hard it is to first recognize it's a pass and react, open up and sprint 15-20, sometimes 30 yards towards the deep middle, all while keeping his eyes on the 2 inside receivers waiting for them to declare their routes... and having to do a 180 turn and run if the designated deep receiver is on the opposite side of where he opened up to originally. AND THEN make a play on the ball when you read the QB's going to throw at him. How many MLBs can even run vertically with slot receivers 30 yards downfield?

I understand QB is by far the most mentally demanding, but outside of that I'd say Urlacher in his defense throughout his career has individually had the toughest job in the NFL. You need to be an insanely athletic LB to succeed in the Tampa 2, and he takes it to another level by also being an absolute beast in the running game. Because of the pass responsibilities most MLBs in that D are anxious to bail out because they're afraid of getting beat deep, which results in being less active/aggressive in the running game. Urlacher is just so athletic that he knows he can afford that extra second to really commit to reading run/pass and still be able to get behind those receivers. It's insane.


Nice breakdown.

You should be in the room when the HOF voters have to make a case for and against whether Urlacher belongs in Canton.

TheRubberDuck45
03-22-2012, 09:19 AM
Qb, Center, CB

GoRavens
03-22-2012, 09:44 AM
Mentally = QB
Physically = CB