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Is Aaron Maybin at 252lbs enough to play RE?

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  • Is Aaron Maybin at 252lbs enough to play RE?

    I really want this kid to be a Buffalo Bill. I love his work ethic, his never quit attitude, and his explosiveness.

    IMO he is the perfect 4-3 RE for our defense, keep in mind Aaron Schobel weighs 243lbs and made the pro bowl for us.

  • #2
    As a PSU fan I think he could be a solid DE in a 4-3, but he could be great as a 3-4 OLB and that's where I hope he will end up. I'd say as a 3-4 OLB he should be a top 15 pick and as a 4-3 DE he should be a late first - mid second round pick.

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    • #3
      so you want a 243 guy to play LE? I don't think that will help your run defense.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Go_Eagles77 View Post
        As a PSU fan I think he could be a solid DE in a 4-3, but he could be great as a 3-4 OLB and that's where I hope he will end up. I'd say as a 3-4 OLB he should be a top 15 pick and as a 4-3 DE he should be a late first - mid second round pick.
        I've given my PSU expertise on him a few times, and I still stand by my opinion on him that I've had for a while.

        He was great at PSU. Awesome explosion, there were times it seemed like he was in the backfield before the lineman could even get out of their stances to block him.

        Now, if he were like a 3rd round prospect as a situational pass rusher, he'd be great to a 4-3 team. Put him on on 3rds and long and let him get after the passer.

        But if he's going to be taken high in the first round, I'm almost positive it has to be as a 3-4 OLB. He will simply get pushed around way too easily and struggle vs. the run if he has tackles on him at the snap like he would in the 4-3.

        So, I'm sorry dude, but if your Bills take him in the first, he's going to struggle. Maybe he'll get you some sacks which is always nice, but he's going to kill your run defense.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PACKmanN View Post
          so you want a 243 guy to play LE? I don't think that will help your run defense.
          No, I would expect Maybin to be a situational pass rusher his 1st year and gradually take over the RE spot in a year.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BeerBaron View Post
            I've given my PSU expertise on him a few times, and I still stand by my opinion on him that I've had for a while.

            He was great at PSU. Awesome explosion, there were times it seemed like he was in the backfield before the lineman could even get out of their stances to block him.

            Now, if he were like a 3rd round prospect as a situational pass rusher, he'd be great to a 4-3 team. Put him on on 3rds and long and let him get after the passer.

            But if he's going to be taken high in the first round, I'm almost positive it has to be as a 3-4 OLB. He will simply get pushed around way too easily and struggle vs. the run if he has tackles on him at the snap like he would in the 4-3.

            So, I'm sorry dude, but if your Bills take him in the first, he's going to struggle. Maybe he'll get you some sacks which is always nice, but he's going to kill your run defense.
            How many 1st round picks come in and start right away? Why cant he be a situational guy early in his career?

            He has potential to be a star and thats why you draft players in the 1st round.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BuffaloBillsDraft View Post
              How many 1st round picks come in and start right away? Why cant he be a situational guy early in his career?

              He has potential to be a star and thats why you draft players in the 1st round.
              He could be a star. He could be. He's going to get sacks, I'm sure of it.

              But he's going to kill your run defense as an every down 4-3 DE in the pros. He struggled with it in college and it's only going to be exacerbated in the pros.

              Thats what I meant when I said if he were projected as a 3rd rounder, he'd be great to a 4-3 team as an Elvis Dumervil "just go get the passer" type who you could send in in certain situations.

              If you take him at 11, your only going to get a career situational pass rusher for as long as you run the 4-3.

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              • #8
                a 252 aaron maybin isnt the same threat he is when hes 20lbs lighter which is his burst...his only quality

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by stephenson86 View Post
                  a 252 aaron maybin isnt the same threat he is when hes 20lbs lighter which is his burst...his only quality
                  That's not necessarily true. Maybin's biggest problem was lower body strength and if a lot of that added muscle is in his legs he won't lose much athleticism at all, similar to how high school kids get bigger and faster as they progress through a college S&C program.

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                  • #10
                    I would say that he would be better suited to play LB like Beer Baron said but also keep in mind that just because you aren't big doesn't mean you can't defend the run. My prime example of this is Trent Cole who I think compares very favorably with Maybin. Trent Cole is so quick that he can just get past the tackle and stop the run, Cole is consistantly the first off the line and he led the NFL in tackles for a loss this season. Cole is a very good run defender.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BuffaloBillsDraft View Post
                      No, I would expect Maybin to be a situational pass rusher his 1st year and gradually take over the RE spot in a year.
                      isn't what that guy from VT is for? imo, if Orakpo isn't there then your best option is to trade down and get an Larry English/Robert Ayers or a Paul Kruger in round 2.

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                      • #12
                        I just don't think he is going to do good in the 3-4 as olb. Can he shed blocks and go after the run, hold the POA. And then when it comes to passing downs can he actually beat the tackle with something other than speed move. He might have the weight but I don't think he has the strength to match, and beat a tackle with some moves. Look at his highlight tapes he runs past the defenders to the qb, he never has to use any technique.

                        As BeerBaron said he would be a great pick up in the third round as a situational pass rusher, and that maybe in any scheme, where he doesn't have to worry about dropping back or worry about the run.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mr. Hero View Post
                          That's not necessarily true. Maybin's biggest problem was lower body strength and if a lot of that added muscle is in his legs he won't lose much athleticism at all, similar to how high school kids get bigger and faster as they progress through a college S&C program.
                          judging by his combine the added weight hadnt helped

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by stephenson86 View Post
                            judging by his combine the added weight hadnt helped
                            He is still explosive. http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/...10-yard-split/

                            A “Great” 10-Yard Split Time (1.55 seconds and under)

                            Cliff Avril, Lions: 1.50 (2008)

                            Chris Long, Rams: 1.53 (2008)



                            A “Good” 10-Yard Split Time (1.56-159)

                            Gaines Adams, Buccaneers: 1.58 (2007)

                            Derrick Harvey, Jaguars: 1.59 (2008)



                            An “Average” 10-Yard Split Time (1.6-1.62)

                            Kamerion Wimbley, Browns: 1.6 (2006)

                            Bruce Davis, Steelers: 1.62 (2008)



                            Below Average 10-Yard Split Times (1.63-1.69)

                            Charles Johnson, Panthers: 1.63 (2007)

                            Anthony Spencer, Cowboys: 1.64 (2007)



                            With an eye toward the 2009 draft class, we can now rank the nation’s top pass rushing DE/OLB hybrids according to their 10-yard split times and break down what each time means.



                            1. Clay Matthews, USC (6-3, 240), 10-yard split: 1.49

                            Matthews made the jaws of a couple scouts drop after he posted a time of 1.49 seconds in his 10-yard split. To put it into perspective, only nine cornerbacks at the Combine ran faster. Matthews obviously possesses an explosive first step and gets up to speed very quickly. He’s proven he has the burst to rush off the edge, which is one reason he’s considered among the nation’s top 3-4 outside linebacker prospects.



                            2. Aaron Maybin, Penn State (6-4, 249), 10-yard split: 1.55

                            It’s obvious on tape that Maybin possesses an explosive first step off the edge. However, what makes him even tougher to block is his ability to consistently be the first defensive lineman moving off the snap and consistently firing off the ball on time. Maybin didn’t have the 40 time many expected (4.79), but his 10-yard split proved he has the first step to reach the edge.




                            3. Connor Barwin, Cincinnati (6-4, 256), 10-yard split: 1.57

                            His 4.59 40 time got all the attention, but Barwin’s ability to coil up in his stance and fire off the ball will make him a success in the NFL. He’s a gifted athlete who has the motor and burst to get after the quarterback. However, his 1.57 split proves he has the first-step explosion to make things happen as a down defensive end.



                            4. Everette Brown, Florida State (6-2, 256), 10-yard split: 1.58

                            Brown measured in a bit shorter than expected at the Combine but ran well, even though I expected his split to be a bit faster. However, Brown plays so low that it’s tough for offensive tackles to get a good punch on him. Brown isn’t just a straight-line athlete; his ability to bend and dip around the edge coupled with his burst allows him to create a lot of havoc versus the pass.



                            5. Clint Sintim, Virginia (6-3, 256), 10-yard split: 1.59

                            Sintim displays impressive get-off speed for his size and showcases good explosion from a two-point stance. There isn’t much flash to his game, but he has enough burst to be a solid contributor off the edge and get after the passer.



                            6. Larry English, Northern Illinois (6-2, 255), 10-yard split: 1.64

                            I worried about English’s ability to coil up and fire out of his stance on film, and his time confirms my suspicions. He consistently comes off the ball too high for my liking, and I don’t think he has the burst to be successful as a pass rushing defensive end. English needs to stand up in a two-point stance to be effective, but his 4.82 40 time doesn’t do much for teams concerned about his ability to play in space.



                            Overall, the 10-yard split is simply another tool to help scouts determine the caliber of player they’re evaluating. Now, I would not consider the 10-yard split to be the end all of evaluations for pass rushers because there are always expectations and other athletic tests to help evaluate them (short shuttle and three-cone drills). However, when scouting pass rushers, I think it’s critical to put more weight on the 10-yard split than a more attractive 40-yard time.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BeerBaron View Post
                              He could be a star. He could be. He's going to get sacks, I'm sure of it.

                              But he's going to kill your run defense as an every down 4-3 DE in the pros. He struggled with it in college and it's only going to be exacerbated in the pros.

                              Thats what I meant when I said if he were projected as a 3rd rounder, he'd be great to a 4-3 team as an Elvis Dumervil "just go get the passer" type who you could send in in certain situations.

                              If you take him at 11, your only going to get a career situational pass rusher for as long as you run the 4-3.
                              I disagree that he "struggled" with run defense. He had 8 TFL this year that weren't sacks (good enough for 2nd on the team), led linemen in total tackles. Certainly his strengths right now cater to pass rushing, but he'll be more than adequate against the run as he gains more weight and gets more experience.

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