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  • Top 10 by position

    Here are my Top 10 by position, been posting this all over the place, hope you enjoy!

    QB:

    1. Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame – Clausen is likely the safest pick at QB, though he may never develop into a superstar QB. He has played in a pro style offense, has adequate arm strength, and has adequate accuracy. Clausen should at least provide a solid QB for whoever drafts him.

    2. Sam Bradford, Oklahoma – Bradford is the ultimate boom or bust pick at QB this year. He will cost a team a high first round pick, but there are still uncertainties about if he can hold up against an NFL beating. That being said, he is extremely cerebral and has incredible accuracy, two traits needed in a successful NFL QB. It’s no mistake that he deserves to be the first QB off the board, but it is risky.

    3. Colt McCoy, Texas – McCoy thoroughly impressed teams with his interviews due to his drive to compete. McCoy in some ways is Sam Bradford lite. A bit shorter and smaller, but he knows the game and has tons of success in college. Better value, and he can develop into a starter.

    4. Tim Tebow, Florida – If Tebow fixes his delivery and the technical issues, teams would salivate over the possibilities of a QB at his size, heart, and intelligence. Sitting down for three years and learning could lead to Tebow being successful in the NFL. There is plenty of work to be done, but his upside is tremendous.

    5. Jevan Snead, Ole Miss – Snead had a great sophomore year in college and established himself as a possible top NFL pick. His junior year, however, was terrible and has turned him into a midround prospect. Even so, he has the tools to be an NFL starter and could be the best value in the draft in terms of QBs.

    6. Dan LeFevour, Central Michigan – LeFevour has a large following who feel he can be a successful starter in the NFL. He has some tools to work with, but has always been inconsistent and has some of the worst mechanics of QBs in this draft. LeFevour is a big project, but a long term possible starter down the line.

    7. Mike Kafka, Northwestern – Kafka is booming up draft boards after a very good Combine and excellent Pro Day. He is extremely intelligent, threw a lot of balls in college, and teams are interested to see if they can transition him to be an excellent back-up in the NFL. Kafka may go earlier than some think he will.


    8. John Skelton, Fordham – If Fordham’s Pro Day was any indication, plenty of teams are interested in John Skelton (Eagles, Rams, Bills, etc). Skelton has the strongest arm in this draft, but there has been speculation his work ethic is a concern. If a team can develop Skelton, he does have starting caliber talent.

    9. Jarrett Brown,. West Virginia – Brown has had a tremendous offseason, but it doesn’t quite match the tape that we saw at West Virginia. At the combine, Brown looked able to throw the ball down field or even fit it in tight spaces, but did not do that in college. A team will take the risk for a guy of Brown’s athleticism and potential in the mid rounds.

    10. Tony Pike, Cincinnati – Pike’s stock has fallen. After an injury during the season, then looking frail throughout the offseason, Pike may not go as high as many thought during the college season. Pike’s inconsistencies just may be too much for a team to overlook. He should still be a mid-late round pick, but his stock is down.

    RB:

    1. CJ Spiller, Clemson – CJ Spiller is an electrifying runner who can do everything. He has gone between the tackles, has excellent speed, and can carry the load for a team. If a team needs a playmaker, they should look no further than CJ Spiller. He can contribute on special teams, on offense, and may be the closest thing to Chris “Tennesspeed” Johnson since the 2008 draft.

    2. Ryan Mathews, Fresno State – Matthews is the runner a team will draft if they want a true three down player. Matthews showed his speed at the combine, along with improved pass catching skills. He seems to be the full package, but still may take some time to be acclimated to the NFL game. There is interested from a wide range of teams (Chargers, Packers, Texans,) and is a similar prospect to Donald Brown last year.


    3. Jahvid Best, Cal – Best is an underrated player in the NFL draft who is currently moving up draft boards. Before being knocked out of his junior season with concussion issues, Best was one of the quickest and most elusive runners in the country. As a late 1st or early 2nd round pick, Best could end up a steal and have a very productive rookie year.

    4. Jonathan Dwyer, Georgia Tech – Though his speed wasn’t what teams wanted, Jonathan Dwyer still holds the possibility of becoming a successful three down runner in the NFL. Coming from a triple option style offense, there is a question of how he will transition to the NFL. Dwyer showed the ability to take over a game, and makes sense for any team who needs a starter.

    5. Montario Hardesty, Tennessee – Hardesty was supposed to be benched as a senior, surpassed by freshman sensation Bryce Brown. Instead, Montario Hardesty took the challenge and turned in an excellent year for the Vols. Showing off excellent vision and cutting ability, Hardesty is a sleeper for the biggest rookie contributer at the RB position. If he finds himself healthy and in a one cut offense (Seattle, Washington, Houston, etc,) he could become a Top 10 RB in the NFL.


    6. Toby Gerhart, Stanford – Gerhart was narrowly defeated for the Heisman trophy after putting up eye popping statistics. There are major questions with his speed and cutting ability, but Gerhart is a pounder who a lot of teams like. He is built well and can be used in versatile ways in the NFL.

    7. Ben Tate, Auburn – Tate showed excellent speed at the combine despite his 220 pound frame. Tate is moving up boards and may be a 2nd or 3rd round pick as a guy who can contribute immediately in a Shonn Greene type of role in the NFL.

    8. LeGarrette Blount, Oregon – Blount is a pounder through and through. Not fast, but he has good vision and always picks up an extra yard or two at the end of his runs. The character questions are plenty, but he could be a steal if picked too late.

    9. Dexter McCluster, Ole Miss – McCluster showed his explosiveness at the combine, and he is a quick little guy who could become an intriguing NFL weapon. RB, WR, Wildcat QB, McCluster can do it all and be a playmaker, but will take some creativity from the team who takes him.

    10. Joe McKnight, USC – McKnight is an outside runner who can be used on third downs and catch passes. Will he ever be a true NFL starter? Probably not, but with teams looking for a home run hitter, they could look toward McKnight.

    WR:
    1. Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State – Bryant has all the tools you look for in an NFL WR. He has size, game speed, body control, strength, and good route running. There are maturity questions, but is that enough to drop him to the late first? Bryant is the best WR prospect since Calvin Johnson, but people continue piling on the questions. If a later round team gets Bryant, it will end up as one of the best NFL draft picks in the past decade.

    2. Golden Tate, Notre Dame – Though his height is not ideal, Tate shows speed and big time gameplay ability on the football field. Tate was one of the go-to guys for Jimmy Clausen this year, and he always made the easy catches, while fighting for the tough ones. He is a Percy Harvin type of player who can be electric on the field as a receiver, returner, and can burn defenses. Tate may fall to the second, but could end up the most productive wideout in this draft.


    3. Arrelious Benn, Illinois – Benn was supposed to be the golden child of the Illini after choosing them as a top high school recruit. Unfortunately, Benn had Juice Williams as his QB and had trouble this past year putting up great statistics. That being said, he is the athletic freak of the WR position. At 6’1, 219 with high 4.4 speed, teams will be intrigued with the possibilities of a true #1 WR in the late 1st or early 2nd round.

    4. Demaryius Thomas, Georgia Tech – Thomas is a risky pick due to his broken foot, lack of concentration, and hands. That being said, teams are starting to buy into the value of taking him in the mid-late 2nd round. His tape shows a possible Brandon Marshall type of player if he can fix the issues he has in tracking the ball and using his hands well. May not make the instant impact some other rookie WRs could, but Thomas has the upside of a Top 10 NFL WR.

    5. Andre Roberts, The Citadel – Andre Roberts is the prototypical slot WR who has the hands and speed to be a dangerous weapon in the NFL. After running a 4.46 at the NFL combine, as well as excelling at the Senior Bowl, Roberts could turn into a legit starter in the NFL. Roberts may come from a small school, but he is a big time NFL player and a likely 3rd round pick.

    6. Damian Williams, USC – Though USC hasn’t had the best lineage of WRs, Damian Williams may be the best prospect from the school in recent years. A likely 2nd round pick, Williams was inconsistent in college with his use of his hands and body. At 6’1 and running a 4.53, Williams has a shot to be a starter at the next level. Should be a 2nd round selection.

    7. Brandon LaFell, LSU – LaFell had an excellent junior year, but dropped balls as a senior and dealt with injuries. LaFell not playing in the Senior Bowl or showcasing his skills in the offseason has hurt him a bit, and he is likely a 2nd round pick. LaFell is big and has decent speed, some team would love to add a player like him to their receiving corp.


    8. Mardy Gilyard, Cincinnati – Gilyard was electric in college returning kicks and tearing up opposing Big Ten teams. He is the type of player whose on field speed and athleticism doesn’t translate off the field, so he may fall a bit due to this misconception of his game. Gilyard should contribute to a team in multiple ways, and worst case, will be an excellent slot WR.

    9. Riley Cooper, Florida – Cooper is a fluid, athletic receiver who is just raw. He contributed to Florida numerous ways and is another guy who will play tough and make the tough catches. Early 3rd round pick who may turn into a starter down the line.

    10. Eric Decker, Minnesota – Eric Decker suffered a devastating foot injury this season which has killed his stock. Though some fans have forgotten him, NFL teams have not. He made some very tough catches before the injury and runs extremely crisp routes. Decker may need a year or two before finding his niche.

    TE:

    1. Jermaine Gresham, Oklahoma – Gresham basically had a redshirt year due to injury this year, and looked bit rusty at the combine. That being said, Gresham is a dynamic, physical receiving TE. Gresham was a focal point on offense for the Sooners as a Junior and showed the ability to make big plays down the field as well as create yardage after the catch. He is a legitimate Top 20 pick, who may only fall due to position. If so, he could be a steal when looking back in a few years.

    2. Rob Gronkowski, Arizona – Another player who lost his season due to injury, Gronkowski is a more complete TE than Gresham. Though he hasn’t worked out yet, teams are high on Gronkowski as a 2nd round pick who can block and give their offenses a new weapon. Another guy who may need some time to get back ino the football grove, Gronkowski should be able to find a John Carlson type of role on some team.


    3. Jimmy Graham, Miami – Jimmy Graham’s upside is unlimited as an ex-basketball player at Da U who moved to football this year. Graham is the ultimate red zone threat, going up for balls and using his leaping ability to his advantage. Graham looked great this offseason as well, living up to expectations. Plenty of teams are loving the possibilities he brings to the table, and may nab him in the 2nd or 3rd round.

    4. Dennis Pitta, BYU – With teams like the Ravens, Bengals, Browns, Seahawks, and Rams attending his Pro Day, Dennis Pitta will get a shot as an NFL pass catching TE. Pitta is an extremely intelligent, mature player who has rock solid hands and superb route running ability. Though he won’t block much, if at all, he is a weapon that teams will need to contend with at the next level.

    5. Aaron Hernandez, Florida – Aaron Hernandez is more of an H-Back type of player coming out of Florida whose stock has fallen slightly. Hernandez has been battling injuries and has not worked out, leaving some teams to question when to take him. Hernandez was very productive at Florida and is an intriguing weapon if he lives up to expectations.

    6. Dorin Dickerson, Pitt – Dickerson wowed scouts at the combine with 4.40 speed at 6’2, 226 pounds. A player who offensive coordinators will salivate over using in creative ways, Dickerson could play an H-Back role or even move into the slot as a WR. Midround prospect with big time upside.

    7. Ed Dickson, Oregon – Dickson had an excellent senior season as a solid pass catcher who played in a spread offense in college. He can create some mismatches with linebackers and could be an intriguing midround prospect for a team to bring in.


    8. Anthony McCoy, USC – McCoy wasn’t overly impressive at the combine, and may fall down draft boards due to that. He had a very good year at USC, though is far from a complete player. He runs hard and is a good blocker, but isn’t very powerful and has dealt with injuries. Likely to be a #2 TE in the NFL.
    9. Michael Hoomanawanui, Illinois – Hoomanawanui isn’t a household name by any means, but he may end up being a player drafted higher than some of the highly touted pass catching TEs. Hoomanawanui is a blocking specialist who could end up as a 3rd or 4th round pick, similar to Richard Quinn last year.

    10. Tony Moeaki, Iowa – Moeaki is a very injury prone player whose stock relies on team’s thoughts of him staying healthy. He runs very good routes and can do a lot after the catch, as well as blocks pretty well. After a good combine, Moeaki is rising up draft boards.

    OT:

    1. Russell Okung, Oklahoma State -
    2. Bryan Bulaga, Iowa
    3. Trent Williams,
    4. Anthony Davis, Rutgers
    5. Charles Brown, USC
    6. Bruce Campbell, Maryland
    7. Rodger Saffold, Indiana
    8. Vlad Ducasse, UMass
    9. Jared Veldheer, Hillsdale
    10. Jason Fox, Miami

    OG:
    1. Mike Iupati, Idaho
    2. John Jerry, Ole Miss
    3. Mike Johnson, Alabama
    4. Shawn Lauvao, Arizona State
    5. Jon Asamoah, Illinois
    6. Mitch Petrus, Arkansas
    7. Zane Beadles, Utah
    8. Sergio Render, Virginia Tech
    9. Reggie Stephens, Iowa State
    10. Brandon Carter, Texas Tech

    C:
    1. Maurkice Pouncey, Florida
    2. J.D. Walton, Baylor
    3. Matt Tennant, Boston College
    4. Eric Olsen, Notre Dame
    5. Ted Larsen, North Carolina State

    DE:
    1. Jason Pierre-Paul, USF
    2. Derrick Morgan, Georgia Tech
    3. Brandon Graham, Michigan
    4. Carlos Dunlap, Florida
    5. Everson Griffen, USC
    6. Ricky Sapp, Clemson
    7. Jerry Hughes, TCU
    8. Koa Misi, Utah
    9. Corey Wootton, Northwestern
    10. Alex Carrington, Arkansas State

    DT:

    1. Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska
    2. Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma
    3. Dan Williams, Tennessee
    4. Jared Odrick, Penn State
    5. Brian Price, UCLA
    6. Terrence Cody, Alabama
    7. Lamarr Houston, Texas
    8. Tyson Alualu, Cal
    9. Cam Thomas, North Carolina
    10. Al Woods, LSU

    OLB:

    1. Sergio Kindle, Texas
    2. Sean Weatherspoon, Missouri
    3. Daryl Washington, TCU
    4. Rennie Curran, Georgia
    5. Dekoda Watson, Florida State
    6. Navorro Bowman, Penn State
    7. Thaddeus Gibson, Ohio State
    8. Eric Norwood, South Carolina
    9. Perry Riley, LSU
    10. Arthur Moats, James Madison

    ILB:
    1. Rolando McClain, Alabama
    2. Brandon Spikes. Florida
    3. Donald Butler, Washington
    4. Jamar Chaney, Mississippi State
    5. Sean Lee, Penn State
    6. Pat Angerer, Iowa
    7. Mike McLaughlin, Boston College
    8. Boris Lee, Troy
    9. Micah Johnson, Kentucky
    10. Darryl Sharpton, Miami

    CB:

    1. Joe Haden, Florida
    2. Kareem Jackson, Alabama
    3. Kyle Wilson, Boise State
    4. Devin McCourty, Rutgers
    5. Patrick Robinson, Florida State
    6. Brandon Ghee, Wake Forest
    7. Dominique Franks, Oklahoma
    8. Perrish Cox, Oklahoma State
    9. Amari Spievey, Iowa
    10. Akwasi Owusu-Ansah, IUP

    S:

    1. Eric Berry, Tennessee
    2. Earl Thomas, Texas
    3. Taylor Mays, USC
    4. Chad Jones, LSU
    5. Nate Allen, USF
    6. Reshad Jones, Georgia
    7. Morgan Burnett, Georgia Tech
    8. Larry Asante, Nebraska
    9. Major Wright, Florida
    10. Darrell Stuckey, Kansas
    Last edited by Shane P. Hallam; 03-14-2010, 12:30 AM.


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  • #2
    I don't like how you have Gilyard at 8!
    my scent?...like making love to a lumberjack
    <TACKLE> i will ngata give you a bj raji
    <+BOE> Scott, with Burfict's character concerns (whether legit or not) you think Pioli would draft him. :D
    <+ScottWright> Why not. Baldwin does need a sparring partner...
    Originally posted by Hermstheman83
    What's with the hate on Ricky Stanzi? Those youtube clips of him with the hulk hogan theme music instantly make him better than Luck.

    Comment


    • #3
      edit: nvm, they are just really close together. Space RB # 3 and 4 out. Good job, I'll finish this later.

      Comment


      • #4
        Not in agreement with the order of some of the top 10 prospects, but think the individual analysis dead on!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Good stuff Shane.


          Although I strongly disagree with Bradford as your #2 QB because on the field I see nothing in his game that causes me concern. With that being said, I know you feel strongly about this and are not going to change it.

          Glad to see you have Montario Hardesty ranked high. It won't surprise me at all if he ends up being the best RB out of this class. You have to love how he runs and his game translates to the next level very well. He verified everybody what we saw on tape with an excellent combine.

          Also totally agree with your ranking of Rennie Curran. Every time I watch Georgia, he pops of the screen. I don't care what his forty was but his explosiveness is elite and his is a violent hitter who never gives up an inch of ground when he makes contact with the ball carrier. His size limits him schematically but I think he could really excel as a WLB in a Tampa 2.

          I see you're very high on Andre Roberts. Interesting. He was solid at Senior Bowl and showed great hands. I've watched a bit of him but your ranking of him will probably prompt me to do a bit more research.

          My main problem with the ranking. Not so sure what you like so much about Ricky Sapp. He has not been productive over his career at Clemson. When you watch Clemson play, he doesn't consistently bring pressure off the edge. He was a guy who everyone was expecting to break out and he never did. He plays high and isn't nearly as explosive and you'd expect. Despite his lack of production, people believef in his upside because of athleticism. He was expect to put on a show at the combine, being rumored to run in the mid-low 4.5's, but he fell a bit short running a 4.70. Sapp is going to be limited to being a 3-4 OLB. I just don't see the natural pass rushing ability and subsequently, don't understand why he would be ranked ahead of Jerry Hughes. I know his frame and upside is more intriguing. But as far as getting after the quarterback, the thing he will get paid to do, he cannot touch Hughes.


          That is all. Keep up the good work. I enjoy listening to your podcast every Saturday.

          Comment


          • #6
            No Andrew Quarless in your TE rankings makes me sad.

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice stuff, but you're not going to write extended analysis for the other positions besides RB, QB, WR, TE and such?

              Comment


              • #8
                Johnathan Dwyers not on your top 10 RBs?


                Thanks to Bonekrusher for the sweet sig.

                NY Giants Super Bowl XLII Champs!

                Comment


                • #9
                  gerhart

                  Originally posted by Shane P. Hallam View Post
                  Here are my Top 10 by position, been posting this all over the place, hope you enjoy!

                  QB:

                  1. Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame – Clausen is likely the safest pick at QB, though he may never develop into a superstar QB. He has played in a pro style offense, has adequate arm strength, and has adequate accuracy. Clausen should at least provide a solid QB for whoever drafts him.

                  2. Sam Bradford, Oklahoma – Bradford is the ultimate boom or bust pick at QB this year. He will cost a team a high first round pick, but there are still uncertainties about if he can hold up against an NFL beating. That being said, he is extremely cerebral and has incredible accuracy, two traits needed in a successful NFL QB. It’s no mistake that he deserves to be the first QB off the board, but it is risky.

                  3. Colt McCoy, Texas – McCoy thoroughly impressed teams with his interviews due to his drive to compete. McCoy in some ways is Sam Bradford lite. A bit shorter and smaller, but he knows the game and has tons of success in college. Better value, and he can develop into a starter.

                  4. Tim Tebow, Florida – If Tebow fixes his delivery and the technical issues, teams would salivate over the possibilities of a QB at his size, heart, and intelligence. Sitting down for three years and learning could lead to Tebow being successful in the NFL. There is plenty of work to be done, but his upside is tremendous.

                  5. Jevan Snead, Ole Miss – Snead had a great sophomore year in college and established himself as a possible top NFL pick. His junior year, however, was terrible and has turned him into a midround prospect. Even so, he has the tools to be an NFL starter and could be the best value in the draft in terms of QBs.

                  6. Dan LeFevour, Central Michigan – LeFevour has a large following who feel he can be a successful starter in the NFL. He has some tools to work with, but has always been inconsistent and has some of the worst mechanics of QBs in this draft. LeFevour is a big project, but a long term possible starter down the line.

                  7. Mike Kafka, Northwestern – Kafka is booming up draft boards after a very good Combine and excellent Pro Day. He is extremely intelligent, threw a lot of balls in college, and teams are interested to see if they can transition him to be an excellent back-up in the NFL. Kafka may go earlier than some think he will.


                  8. John Skelton, Fordham – If Fordham’s Pro Day was any indication, plenty of teams are interested in John Skelton (Eagles, Rams, Bills, etc). Skelton has the strongest arm in this draft, but there has been speculation his work ethic is a concern. If a team can develop Skelton, he does have starting caliber talent.

                  9. Jarrett Brown,. West Virginia – Brown has had a tremendous offseason, but it doesn’t quite match the tape that we saw at West Virginia. At the combine, Brown looked able to throw the ball down field or even fit it in tight spaces, but did not do that in college. A team will take the risk for a guy of Brown’s athleticism and potential in the mid rounds.

                  10. Tony Pike, Cincinnati – Pike’s stock has fallen. After an injury during the season, then looking frail throughout the offseason, Pike may not go as high as many thought during the college season. Pike’s inconsistencies just may be too much for a team to overlook. He should still be a mid-late round pick, but his stock is down.

                  RB:

                  1. CJ Spiller, Clemson – CJ Spiller is an electrifying runner who can do everything. He has gone between the tackles, has excellent speed, and can carry the load for a team. If a team needs a playmaker, they should look no further than CJ Spiller. He can contribute on special teams, on offense, and may be the closest thing to Chris “Tennesspeed” Johnson since the 2008 draft.

                  2. Ryan Mathews, Fresno State – Matthews is the runner a team will draft if they want a true three down player. Matthews showed his speed at the combine, along with improved pass catching skills. He seems to be the full package, but still may take some time to be acclimated to the NFL game. There is interested from a wide range of teams (Chargers, Packers, Texans,) and is a similar prospect to Donald Brown last year.


                  3. Jahvid Best, Cal – Best is an underrated player in the NFL draft who is currently moving up draft boards. Before being knocked out of his junior season with concussion issues, Best was one of the quickest and most elusive runners in the country. As a late 1st or early 2nd round pick, Best could end up a steal and have a very productive rookie year.
                  4. Jonathan Dwyer, Georgia Tech – Though his speed wasn’t what teams wanted, Jonathan Dwyer still holds the possibility of becoming a successful three down runner in the NFL. Coming from a triple option style offense, there is a question of how he will transition to the NFL. Dwyer showed the ability to take over a game, and makes sense for any team who needs a starter.

                  5. Montario Hardesty, Tennessee – Hardesty was supposed to be benched as a senior, surpassed by freshman sensation Bryce Brown. Instead, Montario Hardesty took the challenge and turned in an excellent year for the Vols. Showing off excellent vision and cutting ability, Hardesty is a sleeper for the biggest rookie contributer at the RB position. If he finds himself healthy and in a one cut offense (Seattle, Washington, Houston, etc,) he could become a Top 10 RB in the NFL.


                  6. Toby Gerhart, Stanford – Gerhart was narrowly defeated for the Heisman trophy after putting up eye popping statistics. There are major questions with his speed and cutting ability, but Gerhart is a pounder who a lot of teams like. He is built well and can be used in versatile ways in the NFL.

                  7. Ben Tate, Auburn – Tate showed excellent speed at the combine despite his 220 pound frame. Tate is moving up boards and may be a 2nd or 3rd round pick as a guy who can contribute immediately in a Shonn Greene type of role in the NFL.

                  8. LeGarrette Blount, Oregon – Blount is a pounder through and through. Not fast, but he has good vision and always picks up an extra yard or two at the end of his runs. The character questions are plenty, but he could be a steal if picked too late.

                  9. Dexter McCluster, Ole Miss – McCluster showed his explosiveness at the combine, and he is a quick little guy who could become an intriguing NFL weapon. RB, WR, Wildcat QB, McCluster can do it all and be a playmaker, but will take some creativity from the team who takes him.

                  10. Joe McKnight, USC – McKnight is an outside runner who can be used on third downs and catch passes. Will he ever be a true NFL starter? Probably not, but with teams looking for a home run hitter, they could look toward McKnight.

                  WR:
                  1. Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State – Bryant has all the tools you look for in an NFL WR. He has size, game speed, body control, strength, and good route running. There are maturity questions, but is that enough to drop him to the late first? Bryant is the best WR prospect since Calvin Johnson, but people continue piling on the questions. If a later round team gets Bryant, it will end up as one of the best NFL draft picks in the past decade.

                  2. Golden Tate, Notre Dame – Though his height is not ideal, Tate shows speed and big time gameplay ability on the football field. Tate was one of the go-to guys for Jimmy Clausen this year, and he always made the easy catches, while fighting for the tough ones. He is a Percy Harvin type of player who can be electric on the field as a receiver, returner, and can burn defenses. Tate may fall to the second, but could end up the most productive wideout in this draft.


                  3. Arrelious Benn, Illinois – Benn was supposed to be the golden child of the Illini after choosing them as a top high school recruit. Unfortunately, Benn had Juice Williams as his QB and had trouble this past year putting up great statistics. That being said, he is the athletic freak of the WR position. At 6’1, 219 with high 4.4 speed, teams will be intrigued with the possibilities of a true #1 WR in the late 1st or early 2nd round.

                  4. Demaryius Thomas, Georgia Tech – Thomas is a risky pick due to his broken foot, lack of concentration, and hands. That being said, teams are starting to buy into the value of taking him in the mid-late 2nd round. His tape shows a possible Brandon Marshall type of player if he can fix the issues he has in tracking the ball and using his hands well. May not make the instant impact some other rookie WRs could, but Thomas has the upside of a Top 10 NFL WR.

                  5. Andre Roberts, The Citadel – Andre Roberts is the prototypical slot WR who has the hands and speed to be a dangerous weapon in the NFL. After running a 4.46 at the NFL combine, as well as excelling at the Senior Bowl, Roberts could turn into a legit starter in the NFL. Roberts may come from a small school, but he is a big time NFL player and a likely 3rd round pick.

                  6. Damian Williams, USC – Though USC hasn’t had the best lineage of WRs, Damian Williams may be the best prospect from the school in recent years. A likely 2nd round pick, Williams was inconsistent in college with his use of his hands and body. At 6’1 and running a 4.53, Williams has a shot to be a starter at the next level. Should be a 2nd round selection.

                  7. Brandon LaFell, LSU – LaFell had an excellent junior year, but dropped balls as a senior and dealt with injuries. LaFell not playing in the Senior Bowl or showcasing his skills in the offseason has hurt him a bit, and he is likely a 2nd round pick. LaFell is big and has decent speed, some team would love to add a player like him to their receiving corp.


                  8. Mardy Gilyard, Cincinnati – Gilyard was electric in college returning kicks and tearing up opposing Big Ten teams. He is the type of player whose on field speed and athleticism doesn’t translate off the field, so he may fall a bit due to this misconception of his game. Gilyard should contribute to a team in multiple ways, and worst case, will be an excellent slot WR.

                  9. Riley Cooper, Florida – Cooper is a fluid, athletic receiver who is just raw. He contributed to Florida numerous ways and is another guy who will play tough and make the tough catches. Early 3rd round pick who may turn into a starter down the line.

                  10. Eric Decker, Minnesota – Eric Decker suffered a devastating foot injury this season which has killed his stock. Though some fans have forgotten him, NFL teams have not. He made some very tough catches before the injury and runs extremely crisp routes. Decker may need a year or two before finding his niche.

                  TE:

                  1. Jermaine Gresham, Oklahoma – Gresham basically had a redshirt year due to injury this year, and looked bit rusty at the combine. That being said, Gresham is a dynamic, physical receiving TE. Gresham was a focal point on offense for the Sooners as a Junior and showed the ability to make big plays down the field as well as create yardage after the catch. He is a legitimate Top 20 pick, who may only fall due to position. If so, he could be a steal when looking back in a few years.

                  2. Rob Gronkowski, Arizona – Another player who lost his season due to injury, Gronkowski is a more complete TE than Gresham. Though he hasn’t worked out yet, teams are high on Gronkowski as a 2nd round pick who can block and give their offenses a new weapon. Another guy who may need some time to get back ino the football grove, Gronkowski should be able to find a John Carlson type of role on some team.


                  3. Jimmy Graham, Miami – Jimmy Graham’s upside is unlimited as an ex-basketball player at Da U who moved to football this year. Graham is the ultimate red zone threat, going up for balls and using his leaping ability to his advantage. Graham looked great this offseason as well, living up to expectations. Plenty of teams are loving the possibilities he brings to the table, and may nab him in the 2nd or 3rd round.

                  4. Dennis Pitta, BYU – With teams like the Ravens, Bengals, Browns, Seahawks, and Rams attending his Pro Day, Dennis Pitta will get a shot as an NFL pass catching TE. Pitta is an extremely intelligent, mature player who has rock solid hands and superb route running ability. Though he won’t block much, if at all, he is a weapon that teams will need to contend with at the next level.

                  5. Aaron Hernandez, Florida – Aaron Hernandez is more of an H-Back type of player coming out of Florida whose stock has fallen slightly. Hernandez has been battling injuries and has not worked out, leaving some teams to question when to take him. Hernandez was very productive at Florida and is an intriguing weapon if he lives up to expectations.

                  6. Dorin Dickerson, Pitt – Dickerson wowed scouts at the combine with 4.40 speed at 6’2, 226 pounds. A player who offensive coordinators will salivate over using in creative ways, Dickerson could play an H-Back role or even move into the slot as a WR. Midround prospect with big time upside.

                  7. Ed Dickson, Oregon – Dickson had an excellent senior season as a solid pass catcher who played in a spread offense in college. He can create some mismatches with linebackers and could be an intriguing midround prospect for a team to bring in.


                  8. Anthony McCoy, USC – McCoy wasn’t overly impressive at the combine, and may fall down draft boards due to that. He had a very good year at USC, though is far from a complete player. He runs hard and is a good blocker, but isn’t very powerful and has dealt with injuries. Likely to be a #2 TE in the NFL.
                  9. Michael Hoomanawanui, Illinois – Hoomanawanui isn’t a household name by any means, but he may end up being a player drafted higher than some of the highly touted pass catching TEs. Hoomanawanui is a blocking specialist who could end up as a 3rd or 4th round pick, similar to Richard Quinn last year.

                  10. Tony Moeaki, Iowa – Moeaki is a very injury prone player whose stock relies on team’s thoughts of him staying healthy. He runs very good routes and can do a lot after the catch, as well as blocks pretty well. After a good combine, Moeaki is rising up draft boards.

                  OT:

                  1. Russell Okung, Oklahoma State -
                  2. Bryan Bulaga, Iowa
                  3. Trent Williams,
                  4. Anthony Davis, Rutgers
                  5. Charles Brown, USC
                  6. Bruce Campbell, Maryland
                  7. Rodger Saffold, Indiana
                  8. Vlad Ducasse, UMass
                  9. Jared Veldheer, Hillsdale
                  10. Jason Fox, Miami

                  OG:
                  1. Mike Iupati, Idaho
                  2. John Jerry, Ole Miss
                  3. Mike Johnson, Alabama
                  4. Shawn Lauvao, Arizona State
                  5. Jon Asamoah, Illinois
                  6. Mitch Petrus, Arkansas
                  7. Zane Beadles, Utah
                  8. Sergio Render, Virginia Tech
                  9. Reggie Stephens, Iowa State
                  10. Brandon Carter, Texas Tech

                  C:
                  1. Maurkice Pouncey, Florida
                  2. J.D. Walton, Baylor
                  3. Matt Tennant, Boston College
                  4. Eric Olsen, Notre Dame
                  5. Ted Larsen, North Carolina State

                  DE:
                  1. Jason Pierre-Paul, USF
                  2. Derrick Morgan, Georgia Tech
                  3. Brandon Graham, Michigan
                  4. Carlos Dunlap, Florida
                  5. Everson Griffen, USC
                  6. Ricky Sapp, Clemson
                  7. Jerry Hughes, TCU
                  8. Koa Misi, Utah
                  9. Corey Wootton, Northwestern
                  10. Alex Carrington, Arkansas State

                  DT:

                  1. Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska
                  2. Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma
                  3. Dan Williams, Tennessee
                  4. Jared Odrick, Penn State
                  5. Brian Price, UCLA
                  6. Terrence Cody, Alabama
                  7. Lamarr Houston, Texas
                  8. Tyson Alualu, Cal
                  9. Cam Thomas, North Carolina
                  10. Al Woods, LSU

                  OLB:

                  1. Sergio Kindle, Texas
                  2. Sean Weatherspoon, Missouri
                  3. Daryl Washington, TCU
                  4. Rennie Curran, Georgia
                  5. Dekoda Watson, Florida State
                  6. Navorro Bowman, Penn State
                  7. Thaddeus Gibson, Ohio State
                  8. Eric Norwood, South Carolina
                  9. Perry Riley, LSU
                  10. Arthur Moats, James Madison

                  ILB:
                  1. Rolando McClain, Alabama
                  2. Brandon Spikes. Florida
                  3. Donald Butler, Washington
                  4. Jamar Chaney, Mississippi State
                  5. Sean Lee, Penn State
                  6. Pat Angerer, Iowa
                  7. Mike McLaughlin, Boston College
                  8. Boris Lee, Troy
                  9. Micah Johnson, Kentucky
                  10. Darryl Sharpton, Miami

                  CB:

                  1. Joe Haden, Florida
                  2. Kareem Jackson, Alabama
                  3. Kyle Wilson, Boise State
                  4. Devin McCourty, Rutgers
                  5. Patrick Robinson, Florida State
                  6. Brandon Ghee, Wake Forest
                  7. Dominique Franks, Oklahoma
                  8. Perrish Cox, Oklahoma State
                  9. Amari Spievey, Iowa
                  10. Akwasi Owusu-Ansah, IUP

                  S:

                  1. Eric Berry, Tennessee
                  2. Earl Thomas, Texas
                  3. Taylor Mays, USC
                  4. Chad Jones, LSU
                  5. Nate Allen, USF
                  6. Reshad Jones, Georgia
                  7. Morgan Burnett, Georgia Tech
                  8. Larry Asante, Nebraska
                  9. Major Wright, Florida
                  10. Darrell Stuckey, Kansas
                  I think Gerhart is rated too low. I dont understand why there are still MAJOR questions about his speed. I understand he posted the fastest 40 of all the big backs at the combine (over 230) Why is still considered slow for?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Very high on LSU defenders... Al Woods (#10 DT), Perry Riley (#9 OLB), Chad Jones (#4 S)

                    Awesome work, a good read, and unique rankings. Were you planning on keeping the analysis at skill positions or expanding?

                    big props to BoneKrusher for the sig & avatar
                    - For daily NFL draft coverage:
                    www.twitter.com/ryanlownes

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My thoughts:

                      QB: McCoy, Tebow, and Snead should not be higher than guys like Pike and LeFevour. All 3 are HUGE projects but at least Tebow and Snead have arm strength.

                      WR: Damian Williams should be higher than Thomas and Roberts. Gilyard > LaFell; I also have a very bad feeling about LaFell.

                      TE: Graham waayyy too high.

                      OT: Anthony Davis is still the #2 OT. Trent Williams cant play LT (well) and Bulaga is not as talented as Davis.

                      OG: Mike Johnson waayy too high.

                      DT: Price >>>> Odrick. I really hate Odrick as a 4-3 DT, he needs to be a 34 DE.

                      OLB: Norwood is really low but I can see that for a 4-3 I guess. But in terms of 3-4 OLB he is definitley better than Gibson and most of the other prospects.

                      CB: Perrish Cox should be way higher.
                      save Freeman

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "As a late 1st or early 2nd round pick, Best could end up a steal and have a very productive rookie year."

                        Excellent pulse on Jahvid Best. Your prediction is going to be right on the money.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I was happy when I didn't see Jonathan Crompton in your top 10 QBs. I keep seeing people push him up in the rankings and I just chuckle. I agree with everything Tackle said about Hardesty and Bradford as well. Glad to finally see someone wise enough to put Hardesty above Gerhart. :D
                          Credit to BoneKrusher for the Sig
                          RIP themaninblack

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            you've got some 'splainin to do with Davis and McCOurty at 4 at their repsective positions...

                            and damn, D'Imperio not even viewed as a top 10 ILB. ugh how he's fallen
                            We ALL bleed scarlet
                            New York Giants Super Bowl 46 Champs
                            UNITED: I actually attend the college I root for
                            Originally posted by PalmerToCJ
                            BTW, if it's 3rd and 97... I'm throwing a screen pass to Brian Leonard and he will convert.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Lovin the Dennis Pitta love.


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