Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Would You Ever Spend a 2nd Round Pick On a QB?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Would You Ever Spend a 2nd Round Pick On a QB?

    Call me crazy, but I think at least one, maybe two of the four highly-rated QBs are not going in the first round. It stands logically that if Locker, Newton, Mallett or Gabbert fall out of the first round, they will definitely go in the second. My question is why?

    See, I view QBs the same way I view prized art pieces. If I am not willing to chew glass and move mountains to get a certain piece, then I do not want to spend quality money (i.e. draft value) on it. If I were, say, the Vikings, and I was not willing to select one of the QBs over some mid-first prospect in the first round, why would I feel comfortable making him the leader of the team a round later. QBs taken in the second round are expected to eventually become the guy anyway, and, given the current NFL environment, are likely to be pressed into action at the first moment of unease at the position. Second round QBs are essentially first round picks anyway in this day and age.

    So why would an organization take a chance like this on a guy they did not deem worthy of a first round pick? It does not make sense to me, and I have a feeling some organization like the Cardinals, 49ers, Titans or Vikings are going to have to find a way to justify to their fan base why a guy they were not that high on to begin with is suddenly going to be the guy to lead them to a Super Bowl in a few years.

  • #2
    It all comes down to who's the best player available on your board. What if a team like the 49ers has Jake Locker as their #15 player in the draft, but Prince Amukamara is left and they have him at #4? You take Amukamara, but in the second round if Locker is left and the next highest-rated guy is your #30 player, it's an easy decision.

    Comment


    • #3
      If QB is a big area of need for you then taking a longer shot on a second round guy is justified for sure. Jimmy Clausen started more than half the Panthers games last season, and Colt McCoy who was a third round pick started about half of Cleveland's. Tim Tebow was the Bronco's second pick of the draft and barely made the first round. Every team carries three QBs, generally, and most of them use a backup at some point during the season. I think if you get a decent backup QB out of a second round pick you've done well. Favre was a second round pick who was traded for a first round pick after a year as a backup. Matt Shaub, Matt Cassell, Matt Hasselbeck are other examples of non first round picks who developed into starters and brought a good return to the team that drafted them.

      Comment


      • #4
        well, clearly, the answer is yes, assuming I dont take a QB in the first.

        Pick the Winners Champion 2008 | 2011

        Comment


        • #5
          Every situation is different every year but I get your point. It coincides with a recent article about this very subject (looked at recent 2nd round QBs, who for the most part, most did not pan out). I suspect you read it also but I don't remember where it was (maybe Rotoworld as stupid as that sounds?).

          And I don't view prized art pieces period and you shouldn't either.
          "I'm Ko Simpson!"

          - Ko Simpson

          Comment


          • #6
            I can't categorically rule out taking any position in any round. It's somewhat difficult to justify first round longsnappers, but my out is that Jared Allen was drafted to be a longsnapper.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PossibleCabbage View Post
              I can't categorically rule out taking any position in any round. It's somewhat difficult to justify first round longsnappers, but my out is that Jared Allen was drafted to be a longsnapper.
              Awesome Anecdote is awesome.
              "I'm Ko Simpson!"

              - Ko Simpson

              Comment


              • #8
                I'd definitely take a QB in Rd2. Less pressure to throw the guy to the wolves means more time to groom and develop. Could be the difference between drafting a bust and drafting Aaron Rodgers.
                My sig pic has now come full circle. Lucky me.

                No offense, but your Raiders draft sucks.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gpngc View Post
                  I don't remember where it was (maybe Rotoworld as stupid as that sounds?).
                  Our very own Scott Wright wrote it.

                  Pick the Winners Champion 2008 | 2011

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well I think if you're drafting a QB in the first two rounds, you're drafting him with the hope and expectation that he can be your teams future franchise QB. Even if you can get great value on a quarterback in round 2, if you aren't confident that he's the guy you want to lead your team and your franchise, you just can't take him no matter how talented how talented he may be. We saw this in full effect with Jimmy Clausen last year.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As Scott has constantly pointed out, only about 6% of round 2 QB's ever pan out and even those that do, resemble a Henne, Miami's QB. That's not to say that a miracle can happen but if your team is staking its future on a round 2 QB, good luck, you'll need it???
                      And proud of it!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Like the OP said, if I don't feel like the guy is superstar material, I don't even want to take him.

                        I could see myself doing it if I thought teh guy was superstar material, and a franchise QB, and i know for sure no one else is going to jump me and take him in the second.

                        I think I'm a good talent evaluator, but I don't think I'm so good that I will know a sure fire franchise guy, and no one else will see it.
                        Originally posted by SNIPER26
                        fwiw, i amz deunks ofs myt ass. ilo vez drinmoinz befotre i post. wha t a hreat ideas.z.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Drew Brees is an example of why you take a QB in the second round. Jake Plummer is another. Matt Schaub was a third round pick. A lot of serviceable QB's were second rounders as well.

                          What is a desperate franchise going to do if they don't have a first round pick where a possible franchise QB is available? We all know that if you don't have at least a solid QB, you can forget about the playoff's. How long do you think a GM/Coach can survive in the league by signing free agent QB's?
                          Last edited by marks01234; 02-09-2011, 09:49 PM. Reason: v

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Absolutely I would. Especially if I was picking mid-late second round. Look at what people like Kolb and Schaub can fetch via a trade if need be.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by marks01234 View Post
                              Drew Brees is an example of why you take a QB in the second round. Jake Plummer is another. Matt Schaub was a third round pick. A lot of serviceable QB's were second rounders as well.

                              What is a desperate franchise going to do if they don't have a first round pick where a possible franchise QB is available? We all know that if you don't have at least a solid QB, you can forget about the playoff's. How long do you think a GM/Coach can survive in the league by signing free agent QB's?
                              HUGE difference between a 3rd round pick and a 2nd round pick at QB. Especially in the vein of what the topic is about. Also a big difference between Jake Plummer & Drew Brees compared to the 2011 Quartet.

                              Plummer, Brees, and Schaub were overdrafted. Arizona, San Diego, and Atlanta made aggressive moves by drafting those players. Which is very different from Jimmy Clausen falling to the Panthers.

                              This topic has come up a couple times this year. You cannot pussyfoot your QB situation. When you're talking about a franchise QB, if you don't believe in that player enough to draft him aggressively then you're better off passing.

                              This also applies to teams drafting another player then trading back into the first round to get a QB.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X

                              Debug Information