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NFL and The spread offense

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  • NFL and The spread offense

    If it is such a concern of prospects coming from a spread offense, why don't nfl coaches just incorporate a spread system where they go out of the gun and use zone read type concepts? I think that this could be a great system with the right players in it. Why couldn't it work? You just have a bunch of guys who are percy harvin/ reggie bush types and then one really good one on one receiver like an andre johnson, brandon marshall.

  • #2
    The weakness of the spread option is the speed of NFL defenses and the risk of getting your quarterback killed... so you'd need 3 quarterbacks, so a team like Minnesota could do it if they were to say... acquire Vince Young and draft Cam Newton in addition to having Joe Webb.

    Dealing with the speed of the NFL defenses is a problem though

    Using spread sets like 4 and 5 receiver sets already happens, most notably with the Patriots. Bill Belichick has taken many ideas from Urban Meyer

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    • #3
      It's not unheard of. You're starting to see more and more teams with elements of the college spread in their offensive playbooks. Hell, Josh McDaniels runs an offense that has a ton of similarities, passing wise, to the system Urban Meyer was running down in Florida. Obviously things are tweaked for the NFL, and there are obstacles to overcome, but its slowly but surely playing a role in the development of modern day offenses.
      Originally posted by Mr. Goosemahn
      The APS is strong in this one.
      Originally posted by killxswitch
      Tears for Fears is better than whatever it is you happen to be thinking about right now.

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      • #4
        The job of college coaches is to win games in college football, not to groom players for the NFL. Correspondingly, the job of NFL coaches is to win games in the NFL, not to make things easy for their rookies.

        To a large extent, the reason that NFL teams won't work in many of the spread concepts from college is that they simply won't work against NFL defenses. You'll either get your quarterback killed, or the superlative athleticism of NFL defensive players (definitely relative to NCAA defensive players) will make it impossible to run a lot of those plays.

        You could start the exact same thread 25 years ago asking why NFL teams don't run more option on offense. The reason? Because it doesn't work and it gets your QB hurt. The spread concepts that will work in the NFL are, more or less, the ones that are already present in the NFL.
        Last edited by PossibleCabbage; 03-04-2011, 05:15 PM.

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        • #5
          As has been said, NFL teams do incorporate it into their systems. But QBs still need to be able to have good foot work and be able to see the field while dropping back. Those are the tough adjustments for spread QBs.

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          • #6
            The 'key' in the ZR is a DE who goes unblocked. In the NFL, leaving a DE unblocked is a strategy for failure, not success. It works in college because of a lack of training, poor gap integrity, etc, etc.

            edit: Oregon 'keys' off of a DT, which is what is largely believed to have made their system more successful. Try telling any QB in the NFL that you are going to leave Haloti Ngata unblocked and see what they think...

            edit2: The Spread offense is incorporated to the NFL offenses. The Zone-read is the problem. It reduces reads required to be made (to one - called a 'key').Most of these systems also don't require audibles, line checks, etc. . . which leaves a QB vulnerable to being in system shock when they get into the NFL and have to do all that and more.
            Last edited by descendency; 03-04-2011, 05:24 PM.
            **** her in da *****!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by descendency View Post
              The 'key' in the ZR is a DE who goes unblocked. In the NFL, leaving a DE unblocked is a strategy for failure, not success. It works in college because of a lack of training, poor gap integrity, etc, etc.

              edit: Oregon 'keys' off of a DT, which is what is largely believed to have made their system more successful. Try telling any QB in the NFL that you are going to leave Haloti Ngata unblocked and see what they think...

              edit2: The Spread offense is incorporated to the NFL offenses. The Zone-read is the problem. It reduces reads required to be made (to one - called a 'key').Most of these systems also don't require audibles, line checks, etc. . . which leaves a QB vulnerable to being in system shock when they get into the NFL and have to do all that and more.
              Exactly. Passing concepts from the spread have been in the NFL since the days of the run n' shoot. It's the zone read and option stuff that doesn't fly in the NFL.

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              • #8
                Basically NFL offenses cannot run a true spread offence because of the talent in the NFL. The spread offence takes advantage of weaker athletes on defense allowing the speed from the RB/WR to be able to dominate. In the NFL you have LB's running 4.4's and 4.5's and DLmen running in the 4.6's-4.8's range and are real football players which is crazy. College teams simply dont have the all around talent the NFL teams do which makes the spread offence so successfull


                "Just Win Baby"- Al Davis
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by yourfavestoner View Post
                  Exactly. Passing concepts from the spread have been in the NFL since the days of the run n' shoot. It's the zone read and option stuff that doesn't fly in the NFL.
                  Dan Marino in this day's NFL would be putting up unreal stats.

                  Pick the Winners Champion 2008 | 2011

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RaiderNation View Post
                    Basically NFL offenses cannot run a true spread offence because of the talent in the NFL. The spread offence takes advantage of weaker athletes on defense allowing the speed from the RB/WR to be able to dominate. In the NFL you have LB's running 4.4's and 4.5's and DLmen running in the 4.6's-4.8's range and are real football players which is crazy. College teams simply dont have the all around talent the NFL teams do which makes the spread offence so successfull
                    This is true, but some college teams can stop it pretty easily now. OSU for one is geared to destroy the spread (unfortunately, power running teams move the D around).

                    You are seeing teams move away from the traditional spread into different flavors of the single wing offense.

                    Regardless, as descendency said, the keys are DL, and there is no way you leave an NFL d-lineman unblocked. No way. Even the fat out of shape guys are fast. Also, defenses are way too fast for the spread to effective as the primary offense. As a disguised alternative, yes, it can work.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Brent View Post
                      Dan Marino in this day's NFL would be putting up unreal stats.
                      He put up unreal stats in his day and age....they'd be even more unreal-i-er in today's NFL.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BeerBaron View Post
                        He put up unreal stats in his day and age....they'd be even more unreal-i-er in today's NFL.
                        I dunno, it's harder for a player to get away with rampant cocaine use nowadays.

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                        • #13
                          Seczzzz speedzz can't stop the ZR Spread?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeJoeBrown View Post
                            I dunno, it's harder for a player to get away with rampant cocaine use nowadays.
                            No you didn't call Marino a cokehead.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FUNBUNCHER View Post
                              No you didn't call Marino a cokehead.
                              Those were only rumors, but I believe them. If it makes you feel better, Jim Kelly was a cokehead. I know this because I am friends with people that partied with him, multiple times, back in the day. Totally different era, however.

                              BTW, why do you think Marino slid down so far?

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