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Should the NFL adopt the NBA's rookie contract system

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  • #16
    Yes, the current system has gotten out-of-hand and there's nothing like it in any other sport. The economic risk of drafting a bust is tremendous, and very few rookies have "earned" the salaries they receive. Rookies shouldn't get $40+ million just because they ran a 4.3.

    sig by BoneKrusher

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    • #17
      It would certainly avoid stupid negotiations such as the Panthers/Beason one, but more importantly the Browns/Quinn one

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      • #18
        The Panthers-Beason negotiations are held up over terms of the contract. Money has been figured out. The way I see it, players shouldn't be upset about behavioral clauses in their contracts. If you're an upstanding citizen, in most cases, you'll be fine.



        I am "America's Poster"... http://www.nfldraftcountdown.com/for...9&postcount=25

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        • #19
          I think the biggest benefit to the slotted contracts is that NFL teams will have a much better idea what they're getting from their draft picks when they sign them to their second contracts. 2-3 years of playing time will allow a team to fairly assess a situation before forking over $28mm in guaranteed money.



          I am "America's Poster"... http://www.nfldraftcountdown.com/for...9&postcount=25

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          • #20
            Originally posted by bsaza2358 View Post
            The Panthers-Beason negotiations are held up over terms of the contract. Money has been figured out. The way I see it, players shouldn't be upset about behavioral clauses in their contracts. If you're an upstanding citizen, in most cases, you'll be fine.
            Or if you play great you'll be fine too. If your a knucklehead off the field,that produces on the field the team wouldn't dare go after your signing bonus. The clause is simply to recoup money from players that are busts and happen to misbehave.
            "We're only going to score 17 points?" Brady said before chuckling about it. "OK. Is Plax playing defense? I wish he had said 45-42 and gave us a little credit for scoring more points."

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            • #21
              I think it should be like the MLB and have arbitration. So, lets say you have a first round pick, and you sign him. He gets a bonus according to where he was drafted and a salary for his rookie season depending on his draft position. And then after his rookie season that player goes through 3 or 4 years of arbitration. Basically, that player would get paid what the average salary of the players at his position would who put up similar stats... It is confusing right now as this post is kinda a mess, but some people probably know what I am talking about.

              ^Thanks to Eaglez.Fan for the sweet sig!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by njx9
                that's a bizarre assertion that doesn't seem to have any basis in reality.
                IF Pacman were a bust the Titans would be fightning to take his signing bonus money back, but since he's a great young player there letting it slide.
                "We're only going to score 17 points?" Brady said before chuckling about it. "OK. Is Plax playing defense? I wish he had said 45-42 and gave us a little credit for scoring more points."

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by ks_perfection View Post
                  IF Pacman were a bust the Titans would be fightning to take his signing bonus money back, but since he's a great young player there letting it slide.
                  It is because of the salary cap that they won't cut him, not because they see him playing for them in the future. The only reason Tank Johnson was cut was because there was little money spent on him, but Pacman is a different story.


                  Originally posted by Halsey
                  I don't have to watch it to know it was not interesting.

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                  • #24
                    The problem with the NBA type of system is that the NBA can resign their stud players. The NBA cap is a soft cap. If the player after 3 years turns out to be a stud they can sign them to a deal and just pay the luxury tax if needed.

                    The NFL cap is a hard cap. Competitive teams spend close to their cap each year (yes there is room, but it has been more from the cap increasing than teams just saving money, unless you're the Vikings of course). So, after 3 years your Calvin Johnson's of the world would hit FA and (assuming he plays as expected) get paid mega bucks. I think this type of system (while on the surface looking like a great idea) would hurt veteran players in the 29+ year old range. I mean, why sign a 29 year old guy when you know some 25 year old stud is going to hit the open market this year? Also, if a stud 25 year old hits the market, I think you'd see more 30 year olds get cut to make room to sign the super stud. I think the NFLPA would actually oppose this idea.

                    And, bear in mind that NBA players typically don't provide alot of return on investment their first two years. Very few NBA players are expected to come into the league and contribute signficantly immediately. NFL players are expected to contribute immediately.

                    Designs by Thule



                    Originally posted by DMWSackMachine
                    I just wanna warn you guys not to take TNew41 too seriously. He's....let's just say, special. He's fairly harmless, though. He just needs several years of seasoning before he tries to make any more points, is all.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Smokey Joe View Post
                      I think it should be like the MLB and have arbitration. So, lets say you have a first round pick, and you sign him. He gets a bonus according to where he was drafted and a salary for his rookie season depending on his draft position. And then after his rookie season that player goes through 3 or 4 years of arbitration. Basically, that player would get paid what the average salary of the players at his position would who put up similar stats... It is confusing right now as this post is kinda a mess, but some people probably know what I am talking about.
                      That would be a nightmare with the salary cap. No GM could even do a 3 year projection.


                      The problem arises when people use statistics like a drunk uses a lamp post: for support instead of illumination.

                      If luck is where preparation meets opportunity, then clutch is where failure meets luck.

                      <Add1ct> setting myself on fire can't be that hard
                      <Add1ct> but tackling a mosquito might prove a challenge

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                      • #26
                        The NBA system would really be a utopia for the front offices and I would love to see it implemented.

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                        • #27
                          I think Mario Williams' 6-year $54 million deal with $26.5 million guaranteed should be the cut off point.

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                          • #28
                            Rookie contracts are getting absurdly out of hand and something should be done about it. I mean Laron Landry holdsout until the Steelers resign Polomalu and then signs a deal that trumps him as the highest paid safety when he hasn't even stepped on the field? But putting the outragious money concerns, it would also help negate the holdouts which is another reason it should be addressed. Besides its getting out of hand when a Darrelle Revis pulls the "I'm sitting out a year and re-entering the draft" card ala the MLB draft.

                            Magical sig by OSUGiants

                            SSAEL....... its a new revolution!


                            Originally posted by Job
                            On another note, Nicklas Backstrom is amazingly good.
                            Meanwhile, in hockey the other night, the Washington Capitals' Eric Belanger gets hit with a stick, loses EIGHT teeth, has an instant root canal in the locker room, comes back out and PLAYS and never says boo.

                            So new rule, NBA: Unless you have a root canal at halftime, SHUT UP AND PLAY!

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                            • #29
                              my idea:


                              For the NFL rookie signings, I would combine where the player gets drafted along with arbitration. So, my idea is that for each draft position there will be a different signing bonus and salary for one year, followed by 2 years, 3 years, or 4 years of arbitration. First day picks get automatically get at least 3 years of arbitration and first rounders 4 years. 2nd day picks can be signed to either length. The arbitration years will follow after the players rookie season. After the arbitration years, the player will become a free agent. If a team declines to offer arbitration on a player, that player becomes a free agent.

                              So, no matter where you are drafted you must sign to the bouns and first year salary of your draft spot. If a player refuses to sign, a la baseball, the team gets a compensation pick in the following draft at the same spot. However, the player refusing to sign CAN NOT re enter the draft for 2 more years. For example:

                              John X was drafted in the first round, 10 overall. For that draft spot, the player must sign a bonus of 5 million per year and their first year salary of 1 million. The team and agent/player come to an agreement of 4 years of arbitration, so, that player will recieve a 5 million bonus his rookie year, and 5 million for each of his arbitration years. If a team decides not to offer a player arbitration in one of those years, the player receives at least 1/2 of his signing bonus. The exact amount the player recieves will be determined by an arbitration officer.

                              ^Thanks to Eaglez.Fan for the sweet sig!

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by njx9
                                i'm not sure the NFLPA wouldn't buy it. i mean, who are the current members of the NFLPA? veteran players. who stands to profit the most from increased cap room created by a tiered rookie salary structure? veteran players. i'm not sure why the NFLPA would stand against that, assuming the rookie contracts were, as in the NBA, 3ish year contracts with more guaranteed money.
                                The NFL will never follow the NBA's route. The NBA only has to deal with small rosters and a few picks, the NFL doesn't have that luxury. It has a huge roster and a huge draft, and must by necessity keep salaries for veterans and rookies under control.
                                People are always comparing the total of a contract when using NFL salaries but truth be told, you really need only discuss the guaranteed money. That is all the majority of players are ever going to receive unless they become true stars. They are never going to see the 40 million that is added on to a contract for publicity purposes and for the few that become stars. Each team in the NFL likes to hold the option after the guaranteed money is reached of whether or not to retain a player otherwise the NFL couldn't function.
                                The NFL loves the system it has where only the stars ever see the money they contract for. The rest just watch as the 40 million evaporates into nothing if they don't reach that level of stardom.
                                As for the NFLPA also likes the system for a number of reasons. Rookie salaries drives up veteran salaries and in a sport where the average career is around 4 years, players have to maximize their earnings quickly so restricting rookie salaries makes no sense. Think of it this way, those who survive in the NFL make their money no matter what especially when they reach FA. Those whose careers are limited to the 4 years would make practically nothing from their football careers if rookie salaries are controlled for the 1st 3 or 4 years. Remember, the NFLPA is mostly made up of 2nd, 3rd and 4th year veterans and also remember that if rookie salaries were notacibly smaller, an awful lot of veterans would be released and more rookie players kept on.
                                You can forget ever seeing the NBA system in the NFL, it's not very likely to occur and would probably have to involve a system where the rookies would actually be guaranteed more money than they receive now which the NFL isn't very likely to accept.
                                And proud of it!!!

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