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NFL Network's Top Ten Receiving Corps

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  • #46
    I'm sort of surprised the Colts' receiving core is ranked that low, especially given the depth in comparison. Granted Peyton Manning makes them look better, that's a given, but Harrison has a Hall of Fame career in the regular season, Wayne is a stud year-round, and Clark is a weapon in the postseason (but didn't get to contribute much in 03 and 04 because of injuries, but he lead the team in postseason receiving yards in 06 when he played all 4 games). With Stokley in 04, they produced the only trio of 1K yards/10 TDs receivers in history, and now they have an even better receiver in Anthony Gonzalez.

    Certainly I wouldn't have them ranked lower than the GSOT Rams receiving core, no way. I agree that they are way too high on that list.
    Pugnacity, testosterone, truculence, and belligerence.

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    • #47
      1986-1992 7 Seasons

      "The Posse" Art Monk, Gary Clark and Ricky Sanders

      1287 Receptions
      19278 Yards
      124 TD's

      2 Superbowl Rings
      10 1000 yard Seasons

      If there has been a better Wide Receiver trio in football over a prolonged period I am not sure who they are.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Control View Post
        And my opinion is that Jerry Rice and John Taylor in the 80's was hands down the greatest WR duo ever
        Were you actually there in the 1980's? I think your perception is somewhat off the mark.

        John Taylor's breakout season and best season was 1989, the last year of the decade and consisted of 60 catches 1077 yards and 10 TD's. Before 89 he had 25 catches, 476 yards and 2 TD's in his 2 seasons in the league.

        You disrespect an awful lot of great receiver duos with the above statement. Taylor played with the Greatest Receiver of all time, two of the greatest QB's in Montana and Young and managed just 347 catches 5598 yards and 43TD's in 9 seasons. That isn't the makings of a great duo, it is Jerry Rice plus a good receiver thats all.

        The 49ers passing game in the 1980's was a mixture of some very good players at all positions all more impactful than Taylor. Dwight Clark, Freddie Solomon, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman, oh yes lets not forget Jerry Rice.

        Into the 90's Brent Jones was just as effective at the Tight End position as Taylor was at Wide Receiver.

        On the face of it you can put any WR with Jerry Rice and call it a great duo actually it is the great Jerry Rice plus a.n.other. The closest to a truly great duo the niners had was the three seasons TO spent with Rice.

        Comment


        • #49
          This list is a joke. The Air Coryell receivers at #1?

          Did anyone else notice that John Jefferson fell off the face of the earth after he left San Diego? That's because he wasn't that good--he was a product of a system, as were the rest of their wideouts. And last I checked, Kellen Winslow was a TE...so I don't count him.

          I'm sure you know what I think of the "Greatest Show On Turf" Ram receivers. Not just Holt...but Hakim had quite possibly the worst hands in football...was a glorified Tim Dwight.

          Late 90's Vikings trounce everything on this list, other than maybe the 50's Rams (I have no idea, I've never seen them) and Rice/Taylor.

          A lot of these lists include two great receivers who just happened to have their careers overlap on the same team, but one of them was well past his prime (70's Raiders, 60's Redskins).

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by flave1969 View Post
            Were you actually there in the 1980's? I think your perception is somewhat off the mark.

            John Taylor's breakout season and best season was 1989, the last year of the decade and consisted of 60 catches 1077 yards and 10 TD's. Before 89 he had 25 catches, 476 yards and 2 TD's in his 2 seasons in the league.

            You disrespect an awful lot of great receiver duos with the above statement. Taylor played with the Greatest Receiver of all time, two of the greatest QB's in Montana and Young and managed just 347 catches 5598 yards and 43TD's in 9 seasons. That isn't the makings of a great duo, it is Jerry Rice plus a good receiver thats all.

            The 49ers passing game in the 1980's was a mixture of some very good players at all positions all more impactful than Taylor. Dwight Clark, Freddie Solomon, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman, oh yes lets not forget Jerry Rice.

            Into the 90's Brent Jones was just as effective at the Tight End position as Taylor was at Wide Receiver.

            On the face of it you can put any WR with Jerry Rice and call it a great duo actually it is the great Jerry Rice plus a.n.other. The closest to a truly great duo the niners had was the three seasons TO spent with Rice.
            You have absolutely no idea what you're talking about (and have clearly never seen John Taylor play) so you really need to just keep your figurative mouth closed. Your post is embarrassing.

            Taylor's career went like this:

            1986, rookie season--wiped out with back injury.
            1987--Worked his way up from 4th receiver to actually starting a couple games.
            1988--Was expected to start opposite Rice but was suspended for testing positive for cocaine. Missed first four games of the season, then didn't start until week 15 against Atlanta.
            1989--Started opposite to Rice and recorded 60-1077-10 in only 15 games. The 49ers only threw the ball 482 times that season. He also caught a touchdown in both playoff games and the Super Bowl. Was selected for the Pro bowl. Huge, clutch plays galore.
            1990--Through the first 4 games (in which he missed one of those games with an injury), he had 317 yards and 3 TDs. He went on to play in only 14 games, but that includes a game against Dallas in which he left in the 1st quarter after 1 catch for 17 yards. He still managed 49-748-7. As usual, tons of clutch plays.
            1991--A 16 game season, caught 64-1011-9 as the #2 and was robbed of a Pro Bowl selection (Andre Rison got in over him). Steve Young missed 5 games (and wasn't a finished product yet) and he still performed.
            1992--Broke his leg in week 3 after a really fast start out of the gate (torching Buffalo in week 2). Wasn't the same when he returned that year.
            1993--56-940-5 as the #2 receiver...missed 3 quarters of the Bengals Sunday Night game with a stringer in his shoulder having only caught one pass for 15 yards.
            1994--Played in only 15 games, caught 0 passes in the last game and only 1 in the second to last game (49ers were trying to get him healthy for the playoffs). Had his first truly down year of 41-531-5. He still made several extremely crucial catches that year.
            1995--Last year of his career...played in only 12 games...still managed to make a few clutch plays.

            Taylor was not only one of the greatest receivers ever, he was one of the most clutch--he had so many game winning touchdowns I lost count.

            The 49ers only have 2 rings right now if not for Taylor. He was that important.

            Oh, and also--teams usually put their #1 corner on Taylor (since he was the split end). Rice usually worked against lower-tier corners and linebackers (the exception would be Darrell Green, who almost always lined up on Rice during Niners/Redskins games). The fact that Taylor beat the likes of Deion Sanders, Dale Carter, Jerry Gray, Eric Allen, Carl Lee, Terry McDaniel, Chris Dishman, and Ricky Reynolds, speaks volumes about his ability (I can upload plays in which he has just flat-out beat each of these guys). You'd be hard-pressed to find plays of Rice beating a name corner.

            Giving Rice credit for John Taylor is absolutely disgusting and shows that you never actually watched what took place on the field. Taylor made things happen himself...it had nothing to do with Rice. The most Rice ever did for Taylor was block down field (and of course, Taylor returned the favor many times).

            And Brent Jones...more effective than Taylor? TOM RATHMAN? Just stop, now.

            You're a step away from saying Derek Loville...since Rathman caught dumpoffs out of the backfield in the same way the former did...which doesn't really take any actual ability. Any half wit back can catch a lot of passes if they're thrown a lot of them in the flat.
            Last edited by JordanTaber; 05-24-2008, 05:46 PM.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by flave1969 View Post
              Were you actually there in the 1980's? I think your perception is somewhat off the mark.

              John Taylor's breakout season and best season was 1989, the last year of the decade and consisted of 60 catches 1077 yards and 10 TD's. Before 89 he had 25 catches, 476 yards and 2 TD's in his 2 seasons in the league.

              You disrespect an awful lot of great receiver duos with the above statement. Taylor played with the Greatest Receiver of all time, two of the greatest QB's in Montana and Young and managed just 347 catches 5598 yards and 43TD's in 9 seasons. That isn't the makings of a great duo, it is Jerry Rice plus a good receiver thats all.

              The 49ers passing game in the 1980's was a mixture of some very good players at all positions all more impactful than Taylor. Dwight Clark, Freddie Solomon, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman, oh yes lets not forget Jerry Rice.

              Into the 90's Brent Jones was just as effective at the Tight End position as Taylor was at Wide Receiver.

              On the face of it you can put any WR with Jerry Rice and call it a great duo actually it is the great Jerry Rice plus a.n.other. The closest to a truly great duo the niners had was the three seasons TO spent with Rice.
              On the flipside, it's hard for a guy like Taylor to blow you away statistically when when he has to share production with Jerry Rice, Tom Rathman, Brent Jones, and Roger Craig. John Taylor was an electric player who was complete in all aspects of the game...He could burn you deep or take the short pass long for a TD. He was dangerous at any time he had the ball in his hands. Together with Rice they made up the most dangerous pair of YAC receivers ever to be on the same offense.

              And no, Taylor and Rice >>> Rice and Owens. While Owens at that point in his career was very dangerous, I'm not sure he was a totally finished product...Like he was in 2001 after Rice left. And by that time Rice was long past his "prime" and no where near a shadow of his former self he was from 1985-1995.
              Last edited by Control; 05-24-2008, 05:49 PM.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Control View Post
                On the flipside, it's hard for a guy like Taylor to blow you away statistically when when he has to share production with Jerry Rice, Tom Rathman, Brent Jones, and Roger Craig. John Taylor was an electric player who was complete in all aspects of the game...He could burn you deep or take the short pass long for a TD. He was dangerous at any time he had the ball in his hands. Together with Rice they made up the most dangerous pair of YAC receivers ever to be on the same offense.

                And no, Taylor and Rice >>> Rice and Owens. While Owens at that point in his career was very dangerous, I'm not sure he was a totally finished product...Like he was in 2001 after Rice left. And by that time Rice was long past his "prime" and no where near a shadow of his former self he was from 1985-1995.
                Yeah, not to mention, he didn't play all that long/had a lot of injuries...I mean, what kind of numbers are you EXPECTING from a guy who had to play second-fiddle to the greatest receiver in NFL history and was really only a starter for 6 years? In those 6 years, he had two 1,000+ yard seasons (with 10 TDs in one, 9 in the other), a 940 yard, 5 TD season, a season in which he only played in 9 games, and two seasons where he was really beat up but still managed lots of key plays.

                I mean, this guy wants to lick the nuts of Rice/Owens, but they only had one year where they both topped 1,000 yards together, and that was with Rice 1157 and 9 and Owens with 1097 and 14....in a PASSING ERA.

                And if you want to look at numbers--Biletnikoff wasn't doing anything that impressive statistically when he played next to Branch. Bobby Mitchell wasn't doing that much statistically when he played next to Charley Taylor.

                Art Monk's best statistical seasons came in 1984 and 1985 (at least in terms of total yards). After that, his only three remaining 1,000 yard seasons were 1068 (with 4 TDs), 1186 (with 8 TDs), and 1049 (with 8 TDs).
                Last edited by JordanTaber; 05-24-2008, 06:18 PM.

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                • #53
                  NFLN presented a pretty good argument for the GSOT Rams, I'll give them that, I hadn't seen it until today. I actually came away liking the 50s Rams receiving core more though, those guys really broke some ground and put up highly impressive numbers given the era.
                  Pugnacity, testosterone, truculence, and belligerence.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Geo View Post
                    NFLN presented a pretty good argument for the GSOT Rams, I'll give them that, I hadn't seen it until today. I actually came away liking the 50s Rams receiving core more though, those guys really broke some ground and put up highly impressive numbers given the era.
                    I didn't see it...what could those arguments for the GSOT Rams be that were so convincing??

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Should Lynn Swann and John Stalworth with the Steelers be considered?

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Control View Post
                        On the flipside, it's hard for a guy like Taylor to blow you away statistically when when he has to share production with Jerry Rice, Tom Rathman, Brent Jones, and Roger Craig. John Taylor was an electric player who was complete in all aspects of the game...He could burn you deep or take the short pass long for a TD. He was dangerous at any time he had the ball in his hands. Together with Rice they made up the most dangerous pair of YAC receivers ever to be on the same offense.

                        And no, Taylor and Rice >>> Rice and Owens. While Owens at that point in his career was very dangerous, I'm not sure he was a totally finished product...Like he was in 2001 after Rice left. And by that time Rice was long past his "prime" and no where near a shadow of his former self he was from 1985-1995.
                        Can I preface this post by saying I think Taylor was a decent player and also the early 90's 49ers belong in this argument especially when you add in Ricky Watters, However.

                        All good teams spread production, that is what wins championships. Look at my prior post on the Redskins trio Monk, Sanders and Clark. That is three receivers who in seven seasons all exceeded in seven seasons, Taylors production in 9 seasons. The Redskins also threw an awful lot to their RB's as well.

                        You can apply the same theory to virtually every team in that Top Ten.
                        1.)Chargers - Joiner, Winslow, Jefferson, Muncie
                        2.)Rams - I agree with you actually.
                        3.)50's Rams -Hirsch, Fears, Boyd
                        4.)80's 49ers - Endless list
                        5.)60's Redskins Bobby Mitchell, Charley Taylor, Jerry Smith, Larry Brown, Charlie Harraway
                        6.)70's Raiders - Biletnikoff, King, Branch, Casper
                        7.)80's Dolphins - Clayton, Duper and Moore
                        8.)Redskins - Already mentioned
                        9.)Vikings - Carter, Reed, Moss
                        10.)Colts - Wayne, Harrison, Clark, Edge, Stokley, Pollard.

                        If we want to get into a duo numbers argument, I am sure I can find a number of duo's where both members of that duo both exceeded Taylors production. How we counter the skew that Rice gives I do not know.

                        We have to ask the question.

                        Is the Rice/Taylor duo only mentioned because of Rice?

                        It is an interesting one. I agree Taylor was a fine complement to Rice, and I agree that he was a dangerous player especially on returns but he really should have produced more than he did in that company, and a "complete player" would have done more than Taylor.

                        As far as TO is concerned yes Rice was past his prime, yet was putting up numbers still in excess of those Taylor ever managed, meanwhile Owens in his years with Rice put up 319 receptions, 4758 yards and 43 TD's, equal numbers to Taylor in half the time on a team past its prime..

                        Also I reiterate you said in your original post "in the 80's" which I pointed out was a fallacy as in that decade Taylor only played three years of which only one year was a decent season.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by JordanTaber View Post
                          Yeah, not to mention, he didn't play all that long/had a lot of injuries...I mean, what kind of numbers are you EXPECTING from a guy who had to play second-fiddle to the greatest receiver in NFL history and was really only a starter for 6 years? In those 6 years, he had two 1,000+ yard seasons (with 10 TDs in one, 9 in the other), a 940 yard, 5 TD season, a season in which he only played in 9 games, and two seasons where he was really beat up but still managed lots of key plays.

                          I mean, this guy wants to lick the nuts of Rice/Owens, but they only had one year where they both topped 1,000 yards together, and that was with Rice 1157 and 9 and Owens with 1097 and 14....in a PASSING ERA.

                          And if you want to look at numbers--Biletnikoff wasn't doing anything that impressive statistically when he played next to Branch. Bobby Mitchell wasn't doing that much statistically when he played next to Charley Taylor.

                          Art Monk's best statistical seasons came in 1984 and 1985 (at least in terms of total yards). After that, his only three remaining 1,000 yard seasons were 1068 (with 4 TDs), 1186 (with 8 TDs), and 1049 (with 8 TDs).
                          For a start "this guy" is me, show some effin respect.

                          Next Control stated that Rice/Taylor were the best duo in the 1980's, as I pointed out he only had one meaningful season in that decade.

                          I have no interest in licking the nuts of either Owens or Rice. They as a duo in the four full seasons they played together put up even stats meaning they contributed equally to the duo. Owens took advantage of having a still very good receiver next to him at the very least and produced to deny otherwise is ridiculous. This is the crux of the argument and the Top Ten list, the group as a whole.

                          Control called Rice/Taylor the Greatest duo of all time hands down. Do you believe that?

                          You mentioned Owens/Rice did what they did in a passing era but then go onto contradict yourself by saying Mitchell, Biletnikoff and Monk did not do very much in what by implication were far less expansive passing eras. Yet you should really look closer at the eras the guys you used as comparison and see that their numbers fit right in with both their ages and the times they played in. You do realise Bobby Mitchell was Top Ten in yards and Top Five in Receptions in four years straight playing alongside Charley Taylor from 64-67. He retired in 1968.

                          All the guys mentioned produced in a way commensurate to the supporting cast they had.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by BaLLiN72 View Post
                            Should Lynn Swann and John Stalworth with the Steelers be considered?
                            I don't think there was a more dangerous duo in the 1970's, but perhaps they did not have the supporting cast to make the list. I think the list has a lot of teams that had multiple players producing good production, rather than a couple of players producing heavy production.

                            Did they have strong receivers in the TE's and RB's? I know Franco Harris had 307 career receptions but outside that what did they have.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by flave1969 View Post
                              Can I preface this post by saying I think Taylor was a decent player and also the early 90's 49ers belong in this argument especially when you add in Ricky Watters, However.

                              All good teams spread production, that is what wins championships. Look at my prior post on the Redskins trio Monk, Sanders and Clark. That is three receivers who in seven seasons all exceeded in seven seasons, Taylors production in 9 seasons. The Redskins also threw an awful lot to their RB's as well.

                              You can apply the same theory to virtually every team in that Top Ten.
                              1.)Chargers - Joiner, Winslow, Jefferson, Muncie
                              2.)Rams - I agree with you actually.
                              3.)50's Rams -Hirsch, Fears, Boyd
                              4.)80's 49ers - Endless list
                              5.)60's Redskins Bobby Mitchell, Charley Taylor, Jerry Smith, Larry Brown, Charlie Harraway
                              6.)70's Raiders - Biletnikoff, King, Branch, Casper
                              7.)80's Dolphins - Clayton, Duper and Moore
                              8.)Redskins - Already mentioned
                              9.)Vikings - Carter, Reed, Moss
                              10.)Colts - Wayne, Harrison, Clark, Edge, Stokley, Pollard.

                              If we want to get into a duo numbers argument, I am sure I can find a number of duo's where both members of that duo both exceeded Taylors production. How we counter the skew that Rice gives I do not know.

                              We have to ask the question.

                              Is the Rice/Taylor duo only mentioned because of Rice?

                              It is an interesting one. I agree Taylor was a fine complement to Rice, and I agree that he was a dangerous player especially on returns but he really should have produced more than he did in that company, and a "complete player" would have done more than Taylor.

                              As far as TO is concerned yes Rice was past his prime, yet was putting up numbers still in excess of those Taylor ever managed, meanwhile Owens in his years with Rice put up 319 receptions, 4758 yards and 43 TD's, equal numbers to Taylor in half the time on a team past its prime..

                              Also I reiterate you said in your original post "in the 80's" which I pointed out was a fallacy as in that decade Taylor only played three years of which only one year was a decent season.
                              First of all, i think you rely way too heavily on total numbers to influence your opinions. Did John Taylor "produce" as much as some of those other tandems did? No...did he impact games moreso than almost all of them? I'd say hell yes he did.

                              Taylor is one of those guys who you had to have SEEN a lot of to understand what I'm talking about. It's among the same lines as those who argue that Bo Jackson was one of the greatest RB's ever. Does his "production" suggest that is even remotely close to a possibility? No...but his explosiveness and presence on the field in general speaks for itself.

                              I haven't seen any of the 50's Rams, or 60's Redskins but as for all the others...I'd take Rice/Taylor in a millisecond over any of them. Certainly over Owens/Rice (post-1995), Moss and a 33+ year-old Cris Carter, Torry Holt/Isaac Bruce, and Reggie Wayne/Marvin Harrison.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                And just to touch on Rice/Owens vs. Rice/Taylor a bit more, to say that an over-the-hill Rice "exceeded Taylor's production" is a bit of a misleading statement. He had more yards and receptions, yes...But he did that with inferior Yards-Rer-Reception averages. In 1996 Rice had a pretty unimpressive 11.6 YPR and in 1998, he barely topped 14. John Taylor never had a season UNDER 15 YPR until 1994...Taylor in the complimentary role in the 80's/early 90's was MUCH MUCH MUCH more explosive/threatening to defenses than Rice was in the late 90's in the complimentary role to Owens.
                                Last edited by Control; 05-24-2008, 09:15 PM.

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