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Randy Moss - Most influential football player ever?

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  • Randy Moss - Most influential football player ever?

    Maybe, according to Jason Whitlock.

    http://www.kansascity.com/182/story/1325446.html

    I don't think I'd say he's the most "influential" but I don't think anyone would have a problem saying he's one of the most freakish athletes of all time in any sport. Whitlock says he might be the most influential but he doesn't go into who or what he influenced.

    What do you fellas think?

  • #2
    Try "HELL NO," Whitlock has zero knowledge of the history of the game and needs to shut his mouth.

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    • #3
      He changed how defenses covered deep passing. And that is a big part of todays game.
      Virginia Tech.
      ACC Champions 2004, 2007, 2008, 2010

      Next Up: 2012

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BamaFalcon59 View Post
        He changed how defenses covered deep passing. And that is a big part of todays game.
        Well without Dan Fouts and Coryell there wouldn't be deep passing as we know it, forget the defenses.

        Deion turned the game into a show. Jim Brown played 1 v. 11, required more attention than Moss ever did. Fran Tarkenton redefined quarterbacking with his scrambling. Lawrence Taylor changed everything. The NFL's history is too long and too deep for a guy like Moss to even be considered for most influential.

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        • #5
          I'd say Lawrence Taylor was more influential. Because defense were actually changed in the way that they scouted for certain players.

          Randy Moss I don't think changed anything that wasn't already in place. He's just a very hard player to play against. But he didn't change how receivers were necessarily drafted or scouted. I'd say Terrell Owens would be more influential that Moss was. He has/had a good mix of power and speed that honestly hasn't really been seen before and is very versatile. Moss has a lot of speed and although he is physical to a good degree, I wouldn't put him up there with Owens in that area. Other guys like Raymond Berry who perfected route running and Bob Hayes who was a known speedster made just a big an impact among wideouts in terms of transforming the game.
          Last edited by Ness; 07-15-2009, 05:54 PM.

          "Every light must fade, every heart return to darkness!"
          -San Francisco 49ers: Five Time Super Bowl Champions-
          Originally posted by Borat
          Oh, my bad. Didn't realize SWDC was the pinnacle of class and grace.

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          • #6
            Moss'd him.

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            • #7
              I think Moss brought the size factor to the game. I don't think there were many 6'4+ WR in the game before him that has his abilties; he opened a lot of eyes with that effect, imo.

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              • #8
                How bout........ NO

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by BamaFalcon59 View Post
                  He changed how defenses covered deep passing. And that is a big part of todays game.
                  How exactly? The NFL had been running zone defenses and deep double coverage since Bob Hayes came on the scene in the 60's.

                  Randy Moss is, without a doubt, the most talented wide receiver I have ever seen and ever expect to see. But influence isn't synonymous with talent anyway you define the two.

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                  • #10
                    Well, I suppose it could be argued (especially by Denny Green) that Moss brought back the bomb/deep ball into the league, but that's not near a cause of influence as much as it is a product of his own talents. Which can hardly be recreated, especially by scheme. Moss is the most talented receiver ever, or at least up until Calvin Johnson recently.

                    Rotoworld recently had the following blurb:

                    Randy Moss has averaged one touchdown for every 6.24 of his receptions over his 11-year career, the best TD rate in NFL history for receivers with at least 500 catches.

                    Moss' single-season record 23 TDs in 2007 obviously helped, but he scored at least 15 three previous times and found the end zone on 11 occasions in a "down" 2008 season.
                    Just noticed the OP says this is from Jason Witless. That explains a lot.
                    Pugnacity, testosterone, truculence, and belligerence.

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                    • #11
                      I think Moss along with a few other wide receivers helped to revolutionise the way defenses play the game.

                      The most influential? No, not a chance. But a part of a positional revolution that has altered the game? Without doubt

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                      • #12


                        Oh yeah.

                        What do the vikings and marijuana have in common? Every time you put them in a bowl
                        they get smoked.

                        2010-2011 Super Bowl Champions
                        Hint:Not the Bears.

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                        • #13
                          Most influential? No... Possibly the best receiver ever? Maybe.

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                          • #14
                            He changed the Packers next draft after he poop'd on them his rookie year.
                            -Boston Red Sox-New England Patriots-Boston Celtics-

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by WinslowBodden View Post
                              Most influential? No... Possibly the best receiver ever? Maybe.

                              I still don't think he has surpassed Mr. Rice. He's going to need another 2-3 elite level seasons before we can discuss Moss vs. Rice imo.

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