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underrated traits that most elite rb's possess

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Staubach12 View Post
    People never tend to talk about vision as much as they should IMHO.
    This is a huge one. The difference between a serviceable RB and a dominant running back is their ability to see openings or running lanes that turn stuffed runs into decent gains.

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    • #17
      Vision is the most underrated trait. You need vision to set your timing to allow the blocking to develop & follow them, to find the cutback lane once the hole cleared, to perform about 90% of the plays really. Everyone criticizes Jacobs' weird Eric Dickersonlike upright running style, but at 6-3 or so he can best utilize his vision before his other attributes like power come into play.

      And just when we thought the Every-Down Back who can consistently move the chains on 3rd & 3 or 4 was extinct in the NFL, here comes Cedric Benson .... who'da thunk it?
      Last edited by LizardState; 10-13-2009, 05:16 AM.

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      • #18
        As a former RB, vision is by far the most overrated attribute in football. I don't know, maybe I just had extraordinary vision, but finding a gap never presented the slightest bit of challenge. It's just plain as day, guard's back is turned this way, seam opened up, hit it, etc.

        Also, alot of RBs with "great vision" also have dominant offensive lines who have holes every where. Players who don't get accredited with "great vision" are usually on teams with lesser offensive lines.

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        • #19
          The most underrated trait for a runningback is blance.

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          • #20
            SEC Speedzzz

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            • #21
              Originally posted by J52 View Post
              As a former RB, vision is by far the most overrated attribute in football. I don't know, maybe I just had extraordinary vision, but finding a gap never presented the slightest bit of challenge. It's just plain as day, guard's back is turned this way, seam opened up, hit it, etc.

              Also, alot of RBs with "great vision" also have dominant offensive lines who have holes every where. Players who don't get accredited with "great vision" are usually on teams with lesser offensive lines.
              I don't know what level of football you played RB at, but this is really only true for the high school level. In high school, plays hit exactly where they are designed to hit. Once you get into college, and especially in the NFL, running plays very rarely hit where they are supposed to. Defenses are too good and too fast and make their reads to quickly. That's why NFL runners often see big chunks of their yardage come from cutting back against the grain, often before they even get to the LOS.

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              • #22
                Size of their THIGHS. lol. It's true.

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                • #23
                  vision, pass protection, and shifty but strong hips.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by bigbluedefense View Post
                    pass protection
                    uh definitely this too. rb's who are good in pass protection are a VERY good thing, because one, it shows capability for higher learning, to block on an NFL level requires practice, disregarding a lot of things you did in college, and having an open mind to learning new things...

                    besides, it opens up opportunity for you. especially if you have good hands.
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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by awfullyquiet View Post
                      uh definitely this too. rb's who are good in pass protection are a VERY good thing, because one, it shows capability for higher learning, to block on an NFL level requires practice, disregarding a lot of things you did in college, and having an open mind to learning new things...

                      besides, it opens up opportunity for you. especially if you have good hands.
                      with the way teams throw today, i think its become a must. his ability as a pass protector is actually more important than his ability to catch. although they go hand in hand most of the time.

                      if your primary back can't pass protect and you have to sub him out for another rb on pass plays, it really tips your hand and makes it that much harder to confuse defenders.

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                      • #26
                        Ok, we're talking all time elite RB's here. Guys like Bradshaw, Lynch and Benson are nowhere near that level.

                        Durability was brought up. Part of being durable is training hard, knowing how to take care of your body, and having the discipline to do proper rehab when necessary. Hard working, high character, high intelligence RB's know how to take care of their bodies and increase their chances of having long careers.

                        I don't agree that all positions have the same correlation of elite players having high character and intelligence. I can't think of any RB I think of as elite getting into any trouble during his career. I see guys like Lawrence Taylor and Michael Irvin who got in major legal trouble while playing, but were still elite.

                        Oh, and Emmitt Smith was a smart football player. He may not be good as a speaker, but he has a good head for competing.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Halsey View Post
                          Ok, we're talking all time elite RB's here. Guys like Bradshaw, Lynch and Benson are nowhere near that level.

                          Durability was brought up. Part of being durable is training hard, knowing how to take care of your body, and having the discipline to do proper rehab when necessary. Hard working, high character, high intelligence RB's know how to take care of their bodies and increase their chances of having long careers.

                          I don't agree that all positions have the same correlation of elite players having high character and intelligence. I can't think of any RB I think of as elite getting into any trouble during his career. I see guys like Lawrence Taylor and Michael Irvin who got in major legal trouble while playing, but were still elite.

                          Oh, and Emmitt Smith was a smart football player. He may not be good as a speaker, but he has a good head for competing.
                          so you are basically saying if you are smart at playing football you gonna be a good football player?

                          that is kinda tautological

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