Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1970s Steelers vs 1980s 49ERS

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1970s Steelers vs 1980s 49ERS

    This might not be the place for this but I think it would be cool to see what you think if the 1970s Steelers went against the 1980s 49ERS just want to know what you all think ?

  • #2
    49ers all the way !!

    Comment


    • #3
      Look at all the stars Blount,Lott,Montana,Lambert,too many to count. Steel Curtian against Jerry Rice would be a Fantastic Game.

      Comment


      • #4
        Is it the rules of the 1970's, or the rules of the 1980's? Because whether or not Mel Blount can break Jerry Rice in half midroute and not be penalized is kind've important.
        Still Team The Ke$ha!!!

        [@TDWinstead]
        Originally posted by MichaelJordanEberle (sabf)
        Damn Ke$ha is sexy.

        Comment


        • #5
          The Pittsburgh Steelers wouldn't be able to cope with Walsh's West Coast offense. If any classic Cover 2 would theoretically stand a chance of keeping up, I imagine theirs would be the one, but the West Coast was designed specifically as a response to the league-wide movement to zone heavy schemes that was created by the success of the Steel Curtain.

          Perhaps more important is that I think the Niners defense would have been well suited to handle Pittsburgh's attack. Lott, whether at corner or safety, would have taken the top away from that great deep passing attack.

          The matchup I'd be most interested to watch? Joe Montana throwing the quick slant to Rice against Jack Ham.
          Last edited by Paranoidmoonduck; 05-24-2010, 11:49 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Rodger Craig in the middle to Lambert. Other than Lott who else does San Fran have to beat that Steelers offense?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dannyz View Post
              Rodger Craig in the middle to Lambert. Other than Lott who else does San Fran have to beat that Steelers offense?
              Hicks, Reynold, and Dean?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dannyz View Post
                Rodger Craig in the middle to Lambert. Other than Lott who else does San Fran have to beat that Steelers offense?
                Kenna Turner, Michael Carter, Charles Haley, Fred Dean, Eric Wright, Dwight Hicks, and Kevin Fagan were some of the notable names on defense.

                "Every light must fade, every heart return to darkness!"
                -San Francisco 49ers: Five Time Super Bowl Champions-
                Originally posted by Borat
                Oh, my bad. Didn't realize SWDC was the pinnacle of class and grace.

                Comment


                • #9
                  OK Cool Thank You. Yeah that would be a good game

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    niners, hands down.

                    charles haley would just pull out his dick on the field and start talking about the steelers players wives in an explicit manner while beating off
                    E]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Paranoidmoonduck View Post
                      The Pittsburgh Steelers wouldn't be able to cope with Walsh's West Coast offense. If any classic Cover 2 would theoretically stand a chance of keeping up, I imagine theirs would be the one, but the West Coast was designed specifically as a response to the league-wide movement to zone heavy schemes that was created by the success of the Steel Curtain.

                      Perhaps more important is that I think the Niners defense would have been well suited to handle Pittsburgh's attack. Lott, whether at corner or safety, would have taken the top away from that great deep passing attack.

                      The matchup I'd be most interested to watch? Joe Montana throwing the quick slant to Rice against Jack Ham.
                      I thought the WCO was designed to beat the heavy blitz/man-to-man schemes that teams started running in the 80s? To be fair, the WCO Walsh installed in SF was completely different than the one he ran under Paul Brown with the Bengals in the late 70s/early 80s. Pitt's Cover Two is the perfect defense to stop the SF West Coast Offense (as we saw with Oak-TB), and the proliferation of the Tampa Two in the late 90s/early 2000s is a huge reason why we saw the true WCO die out in that time period.

                      This would be an aboslutely amazing game to watch, though. So many Hall of Famers it'd be unreal.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paranoidmoonduck View Post
                        The Pittsburgh Steelers wouldn't be able to cope with Walsh's West Coast offense. If any classic Cover 2 would theoretically stand a chance of keeping up, I imagine theirs would be the one, but the West Coast was designed specifically as a response to the league-wide movement to zone heavy schemes that was created by the success of the Steel Curtain.

                        Perhaps more important is that I think the Niners defense would have been well suited to handle Pittsburgh's attack. Lott, whether at corner or safety, would have taken the top away from that great deep passing attack.

                        The matchup I'd be most interested to watch? Joe Montana throwing the quick slant to Rice against Jack Ham.
                        Dude, you got it totally backwards. You beat the Tampa 2 vertically.

                        WCO was designed to beat the 46 style defenses, the Tampa 2 was born after the WCO became a trend in the NFL, to combat the WCO.

                        Then the Tampa 2 saw its demise when the league went vertical again.

                        Which is why you see the ZB and 46 popular again. The ever revolving door of football "evolution" if you will. We just keep going in circles.

                        Mark my words, the next trend will be going to a 4-3 defense. The 4-3 is the new 3-4, if that makes any sense.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by bigbluedefense View Post
                          Dude, you got it totally backwards. You beat the Tampa 2 vertically.
                          You beat the original form of the Cover-2 by expanding the dangerous middle of the field. You run the ball and do really quick passes early to keep the linebackers from being able to take a step back and sit in passing lanes and then you exploit those gaps with a variety of inside routes, both deep and shallow. So, unless, I'm missing something, that's exactly the entire idea behind Walsh's original imagining of the WCO. He built that offense to pull zones around the field and create those gaps that would allow for big plays.
                          Last edited by Paranoidmoonduck; 05-25-2010, 11:21 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by yourfavestoner View Post
                            I thought the WCO was designed to beat the heavy blitz/man-to-man schemes that teams started running in the 80s? To be fair, the WCO Walsh installed in SF was completely different than the one he ran under Paul Brown with the Bengals in the late 70s/early 80s. Pitt's Cover Two is the perfect defense to stop the SF West Coast Offense (as we saw with Oak-TB), and the proliferation of the Tampa Two in the late 90s/early 2000s is a huge reason why we saw the true WCO die out in that time period.

                            This would be an aboslutely amazing game to watch, though. So many Hall of Famers it'd be unreal.
                            The West Coast offense hasn't died out. It's still prevalent today in the majority of offenses. At least elements of it. As for referencing Oakland and Tampa Bay, it was John Gruden's experience with his old team that was the difference maker, not necessarily the offensive scheme of the Oakland Raiders and defensive scheme of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

                            "Every light must fade, every heart return to darkness!"
                            -San Francisco 49ers: Five Time Super Bowl Champions-
                            Originally posted by Borat
                            Oh, my bad. Didn't realize SWDC was the pinnacle of class and grace.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Paranoidmoonduck View Post
                              You beat the original form of the Cover-2 by expanding the dangerous middle of the field. You run the ball and do really quick passes early to keep the linebackers from being able to take a step back and sit in passing lanes and then you exploit those gaps with a variety of inside routes, both deep and shallow. So, unless, I'm missing something, that's exactly the entire idea behind Walsh's original imagining of the WCO. He built that offense to pull zones around the field and create those gaps that would allow for big plays.
                              This strategy would be excellent against a Cover Two defense that can't get a lot of pressure and disruption from it's front four. It doesn't really work in practice, though, because of the way the corners play in the Cover Two defense (especially before the rules changes). The corners do everything possible to keep their man at the line of scrimmage and funnel everything inside. They can do know they have safety help over the top and it gives the linebackers far less ground to cover, as well as an extra second or two to cover it. This problem is exacerbated when the defensive line is wreaking havoc with just a four man rush - you've got seven guys to cover (5 underneath), which makes windows really, really small. That's the major reason why we're seeing the Cover Two die off - because corners can't get away with nearly as much as they used to be able to and coordinators are much more adept at finding way to get their guys clean releases.

                              The only way to really, really expose the weakness of the Cover Two is to have a pounding running game that forces one of the safeties to come up consistently. If they're allowed to keep two deep the majority of the time, there's only two really vulnerable spots on it - the deep middle, splitting the two safeties and the "honey hole" in between the CB and S. Problem is that hitting these spots with any sort of consistency requires a lot of time and protection.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X

                              Debug Information