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The Interesting Article Thread

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  • The Interesting Article Thread

    Okay, so I was reading a couple of interesting articles last night, and wanted to get people's opinions on them. Problem is, they're not really "news" and don't really deserve to have their own thread, and any discussion about these topics will die after about 2 posts in the respective team threads (if they're even seen at all). So I figured we could make a thread for those random, interesting articles that don't really fit anywhere else on the board. This way, they'll actually get seen and (hopefully) discussed. It is the dead part of football, after all.

    Feel free to post interesting articles and editorials that you've read. Like I said, hopefully we can get some decent discussion going during this awful dead period.

    So, the first one:
    Pay Johnson What He's Worth

    I completely agree with everything John Clayton says in this article. There isn't a single position that gets screwed harder contractually than the late first round runningback.

    Other than top-10 picks, rookies have very, very affordable deals. Runningbacks drafted in the top 10 make huge bucks, and backs drafted after the first round usually get a nice, hefty contract because it's generally understood that they've vastly outperformed their contracts. However, a back like Johnson carries the "first round contract" stigma, so the perception is that he's making huge bucks. Truth be told, he's making closer to the guys in the second round than the guys at the top of the draft.

    Considering the demanding nature of the position, as well as the incredibly short prime, I have no problem with a runningback wanting to get paid. Like Clayton says, what usually happens is that guys get pounded into oblivion and get sent off into the sunset. Best case scenario is that their team pays them outrageous money for past performance. The problem with this, though, is that the team knows it has a ton of money tied up into a declining asset, so they negotiate the contract in a way that allows them to get out of it after a year or two.

    With the lockout looming, it's not surprising to see so many guys holding out for better contracts. With so many guys becoming RFAs instead of UFAs, we're seeing a lot of good, young guys in their primes missing out on millions of dollars. Furthermore, they may even have a year cut out of their primes due to the owners locking the players out next year. I can totally understand and empathize with them.

  • #2
    The Titans betta' pay de'man if aye know what's good for'um.

    *spits and cracks knuckles*
    Still Team The Ke$ha!!!

    [@TDWinstead]
    Originally posted by MichaelJordanEberle (sabf)
    Damn Ke$ha is sexy.

    Comment


    • #3
      One thing I've always thought might help situations like CJ's would be to shorten rookie deal lengths. Iirc, right now, picks 1-16 can have a max contract of 6 years, 17-32 a max of 5 and every pick after that a max of 4.

      I say make the top 10 picks have a max of 5, with all others a max of 4.

      I think that normally, most players have identified themselves as being worthy of an extension or a bust by year 4. If this were the case, CJ would have a lot more leverage with only 2 years remaining on his deal rather than the 3 he's currently stuck with......he hasn't even played out half his contract yet. And it's pretty clear that it's not paying him what he's worth......

      Just another thing to add to the giant pile of issues the NFL needs to address. Getting rookie salaries under control should still be a priority in the new CBA though. Did you know there's a good chance Eric Berry will become the league's highest paid safety without ever taking a single snap? Ludicrous. Absolutely ******* asinine and ludicrous.

      Comment


      • #4
        http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...ls-first-team/

        Brohm running with the first team. #1 pick is locked up.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think Buffalo could have a decent defense. Poz and Kawika inside, Maybin and Schoebel outside, Troup at NT. They have a good secondary.

          If they run the ball like hell, which they claim they will, maybe this team will muster up 4 wins or so.

          I still think St. Louis is worse than them on paper.

          Comment


          • #6
            I actually hope for a young Buffalo D. I guess Schobel will retire, or atleast i would if i i was him (no need for another Kampman), and maybe later Coleman can take the other spot next to Maybin (who is still a big question to me). In the inside Poz + Moats.
            "Not only is Polamalu the best player in the AFC North, but I feel he's the best defensive player in the entire NFL. No defender in the league combines world-class athleticism, smarts, fundamentals, natural football instincts and the knack for big plays better than Polamalu."

            Comment


            • #7
              http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5259694


              hahahaha
              Originally posted by ATLDirtyBirds
              Coples is that dude.
              Go Amare. I Love Tayshaun Prince...

              Orioles - Raiders - UNC - Nuggets/Wizards

              Comment


              • #8
                Just cut bait and let the Brits have their team back.
                Don't know how they turned $2.2bil down.

                Digging themselves deeper and deeper.
                If they don't re-sign some of our young core players, they'll have proved their ineptitude and frugality as owners and will have me venturing into the darkside.

                If they let more than one or two of Tanard Jackson, Donald Penn, Barrett Ruud, Davin Joseph, Carnell Williams, Stylez G. White, or even Trueblood go, I'm gonna burn this city down.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bigbluedefense View Post
                  I think Buffalo could have a decent defense. Poz and Kawika inside, Maybin and Schoebel outside, Troup at NT. They have a good secondary.

                  If they run the ball like hell, which they claim they will, maybe this team will muster up 4 wins or so.

                  I still think St. Louis is worse than them on paper.
                  Agree with it all. In my 2011 mock, I had them picking 3rd behind St. Louis and Tampa Bay....still got their QB in Locker at least.

                  When Spiller was drafted, I figured their run game might give them an extra win or two in 2010, but not getting a QB, LT or any other real worthwhile key position will hurt down the line...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Owner's should be careful what they wish for. Despite the top picks getting ridiculously huge salaries, the rest of drafted players are great value and later round picks are forced to play for very little for a number of years. In order to correct the top part of the draft Owners will have to give something up. If all rookies get a year less on their rookie contracts it will cost the owners much more than they save.

                    As for Chris Johnson. If I'm the Titans I wouldn't want to set the precedent of renegotiating deals when the majority of the current contract hasn't been played yet. It would just lead to players much more frequently complaining on their contracts and causing distractions. After this upcoming season I expect them to do a deal.
                    Last edited by Bucs_Rule; 06-07-2010, 11:27 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bucs_Rule View Post
                      Owner's should be careful what they wish for. Despite the top picks getting ridiculously huge salaries, the rest of drafted players are great value and later round picks are forced to play for very little for a number of years. In order to correct the top part of the draft Owners will have to give something up. If all rookies get a year less on their rookie contracts it will cost the owners much more than they save.

                      As for Chris Johnson. If I'm the Titans I wouldn't want to set the precedent of renegotiating deals when the majority of the current contract hasn't been played yet. It would just lead to players much more frequently complaining on their contracts and causing distractions. After this upcoming season I expect them to do a deal.
                      At the same time, though, I think the owners eventually have to acknowledge the time-sensitivity of the runningback position. They take such a pounding and have such a dropoff in production that they really only have one big contract in them.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bucs_Rule View Post
                        Owner's should be careful what they wish for. Despite the top picks getting ridiculously huge salaries, the rest of drafted players are great value and later round picks are forced to play for very little for a number of years. In order to correct the top part of the draft Owners will have to give something up. If all rookies get a year less on their rookie contracts it will cost the owners much more than they save.

                        As for Chris Johnson. If I'm the Titans I wouldn't want to set the precedent of renegotiating deals when the majority of the current contract hasn't been played yet. It would just lead to players much more frequently complaining on their contracts and causing distractions. After this upcoming season I expect them to do a deal.
                        And what if he Culpepper's his knee? Torn everything...probably a year and multiple surgeries before he can even think about playing football again.

                        I can absolutely see why CJ would want a new deal now...and in this instance, I think it would be perfectly fine for the Titans to give him one.

                        As for the handling of contracts as a whole, I think shortening the length of rookie deals along with a salary structure to keep rookie contracts reasonable would work out for both parties in the end.

                        The owners would save money by paying significantly less to unproven players who could bust, while the players selected later in the first round would benefit since, if they perform well, will hit their big paydays sooner.

                        Imagine if the Raiders didn't have to pay Russell so much....if there was a salary structure in place that paid him say, the average annual salary of QBs with a reasonable, middle of the pack signing bonus. They would have saved literally tens of millions of dollars...now think about the tens of millions of dollars that would be saved by every team that normally would have to pay that to a bust, you end up with quite a lot of money.

                        Now reverse it and say a player drafted later on, who under the current system has an absolute bargain contract like CJ, wildly outperforms it and wants more money. The money saved by not paying busts top dollar for next to nothing can be put back into the player's pockets by giving the guy who did well a mega contract that he actually deserved.

                        Over the course of about a decade...as struggling teams improve and good teams fade, each team will eventually save some money by not paying busts a lot of money and can then reinvest it into their own players who actually have performed well.

                        I'm having some trouble explaining it how I see it...I hope I made that clear enough.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BeerBaron View Post
                          Agree with it all. In my 2011 mock, I had them picking 3rd behind St. Louis and Tampa Bay....still got their QB in Locker at least.

                          When Spiller was drafted, I figured their run game might give them an extra win or two in 2010, but not getting a QB, LT or any other real worthwhile key position will hurt down the line...
                          Yeah, they might screw themselves out of Locker or Mallet.

                          If I were them, I'd run a boatload of wildcat with Jackson and Spiller. Its not like they have any other kind of offense that can scare anyone.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hahahahahaha...haha...ahhh..ha....ha.

                            ----

                            Aaron Rodgers calls Tony Kornheiser "stupid," "dumb" and "terrible"

                            Posted by Michael David Smith on June 8, 2010 10:52 AM ET
                            In 2008, when Tony Kornheiser was a Monday Night Football commentator for ESPN, Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers once sat down with him for a pre-game production meeting.

                            It would be an extreme understatement to say that Rodgers came away unimpressed.

                            In an interview with ESPN Radio in Milwaukee, Rodgers went off on Kornheiser and said he was embarrassingly unprepared for his job.

                            "You know who was better than Tony Kornheiser? Dennis Miller was ten times better," Rodgers said, via SportsRadioInterviews.com. "Dennis Miller was a great comedian, but one of the worst Monday Night Football guys ever. And he was ten times better than Tony Kornheiser. His stuff was actually funny. Tony wasn't funny at all. He did absolutely no research. We'd sit in those production meetings and he would add absolutely nothing to the conversation. I'd be like, 'What are we doing here? This is stupid.'"

                            Rodgers praised Monday Night Football play-by-play man Mike Tirico as coming into production meetings thoroughly prepared. Kornheiser? Not so much.

                            "You get in there with Tony and he's asking you all these dumb questions that have no application to the game you are playing or anything you are doing," Rodgers said. "He's terrible. . . . I don't think he's funny. I don't think he's insightful. I don't think knows, really, anything about sports."

                            Most football fans regard Ron Jaworski as one of the top analysts in the business, but Rodgers isn't particularly thrilled with Jaworski, either.

                            "I like him, but, when I was coming out, he did the worst segment in the history of TV about me talking about my fundamentals," Rodgers said of Jaworski. "It was not even close to anywhere near my fundamentals. The first time I met him, someone introduced me to him and I said, 'Yeah I know him. He's the guy who ripped me before the draft.' The rest of the night he told me how great I was. I was like, 'I know your song and dance.' And now he loves me."

                            The whole interview, in which Rodgers criticized other ESPN employees and took a shot at the Detroit Lions, is well worth listening to. Rodgers comes across as an entertaining and engaging player who's not afraid to speak his mind. When he retires, he'd be perfect for the Monday Night Football booth. Or as co-host of Pardon the Interruption.

                            http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com...-and-terrible/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Sounds like fame and recognition are getting to Aaron Rodgers head. Careful Rodgers, you may be a beast in the making, but you do have your flaws too. Youre not the second coming just yet.

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