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Pivotal plays in NFL History

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Don Vito View Post
    I thought the injury was before Rivers was drafted but I guess I was wrong good call


    Good chance hes a Dolphin now instead of a Saint if his shoulder isnt hurt. They took Culpepper because they feared the shoulder injury would ruin Brees.
    Originally posted by Thumper/JBCX/Bixby
    Orton will never be in the same class as the Drew Brees or the Peyton Mannings or the Tom Bradys of the world. Kevin Kolb has the potential to be that kind of player.

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    • #17
      Jesus that was a lot longer ago than I remembered, the Culpepper signing was a very big deal at the time for Miami

      Comment


      • #18
        A lot of the good ones getting mentioned. An obscure one I've been thinking about is when Flutie got benched back in 1999 by Wade Phillips. I'm not saying Flutie was an amazing QB or anything, but he was doing some good things for them that season and he shouldn't have been pulled for Rob Johnson in my opinion.

        A recent game that changed the Bengals would be that dreadful play off game in the 2005-2006 season when Palmer went down.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by 7DnBrnc53 View Post
          This thread is about plays that altered the course of a franchise.

          For example, the Tom Brady injury in 2008(that altered not only New England's future, but possibly also Denver's and several other teams as well).
          I don't see how this is a pivotal play in NFL history...seeing as how New England went on to have a great record that season and this past season made the playoffs like they always do. Brady is still playing at a high level and the Patriots are practically a lock to win the division practically every single season. And they'll most likely do it again. I wouldn't be surprised if they won the Super Bowl yet again. New England really hasn't changed ever since Tom Brady's injury, and it didn't really open the door for anyone else wide open, especially in their division, or end the Patriots reign as a good team in the NFL.
          Last edited by Ness; 07-12-2010, 04:43 AM.

          "Every light must fade, every heart return to darkness!"
          -San Francisco 49ers: Five Time Super Bowl Champions-
          Originally posted by Borat
          Oh, my bad. Didn't realize SWDC was the pinnacle of class and grace.

          Comment


          • #20
            If your talking about the Patriots you would have to think that Mo Lewis' hit on Drew Bledsoe changed NFL history more than the hit on Brady 2 years ago.
            Originally posted by George Carlin

            In Football the object is for the Field General to be on target with his aerial assault, riddling the Defence by hitting his Receivers with deadly accuracy, in spite of the Blitz, even if he has to use the Shotgun. With short bullet passes and long bombs he marches his troops into enemy territory, balancing this aerial assault with a sustained ground attack which punches holes in the forward wall of the enemy’s Defensive Line.

            In Baseball the object is to go home and be safe.

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            • #21
              Steelers not hiring Ken Whisenhunt as their HC

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              • #22
                From a Colts point of view the 2006 AFC Divisional game. With 80 seconds to go the Steelers, leading by 3, got the ball on the 2 yard line. Brackett popped the ball lose, Nick Harper recovered and instead of doing the sensible thing of getting a blocker he decided to run straight at Ben Rothlesberger. In the end it came down to a Mike Vanderjagdt Field Goal - the "He Missed It" Field Goal. If either of those plays had gone to Colts way then the Colts would probably have won the Superbowl that year, playing a poor Denver team in the AFC Championship game and then a poor Seahawks team in the Superbowl.
                Originally posted by George Carlin

                In Football the object is for the Field General to be on target with his aerial assault, riddling the Defence by hitting his Receivers with deadly accuracy, in spite of the Blitz, even if he has to use the Shotgun. With short bullet passes and long bombs he marches his troops into enemy territory, balancing this aerial assault with a sustained ground attack which punches holes in the forward wall of the enemy’s Defensive Line.

                In Baseball the object is to go home and be safe.

                Comment


                • #23
                  ^ That sig makes me happy, sadly.

                  But yeah, it's been mentioned. The most crucial single play to define a team's fortunes and legacy. Ouch.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Ness View Post
                    I don't see how this is a pivotal play in NFL history...seeing as how New England went on to have a great record that season and this past season made the playoffs like they always do. Brady is still playing at a high level and the Patriots are practically a lock to win the division practically every single season. And they'll most likely do it again. I wouldn't be surprised if they won the Super Bowl yet again. New England really hasn't changed ever since Tom Brady's injury, and it didn't really open the door for anyone else wide open, especially in their division, or end the Patriots reign as a good team in the NFL.
                    Well, if Brady doesn't get hurt, Cassel doesn't play. And that probably would mean that Cutler is still in Denver, and Tebow is with another team.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      The Saints were on their own 25-yard line looking at second down and 10. Quarterback Aaron Brooks passed the ball to the right side of the field to receiver Donté Stallworth, who caught the pass at midfield. Stallworth then bounced off a tackle and turned inside and broke two more tackles. The clock had already reached zero, and Stallworth pitched the ball to the 34-yard line to Michael Lewis who ran the ball to the 25-yard line of Jacksonville. He then turned and pitched the ball to Deuce McAllister, who ran to the Jaguars' 20-yard line. McAllister then pitched the ball to the right side of the field to Jerome Pathon, who caught the ball at the 24-yard line of Jacksonville. Brooks, who had hustled all the way upfield, then laid a block on the last Jaguars defender and Pathon dove into the end-zone.

                      There was a lengthy delay while the officials determined that all of the ball transfers were indeed legal laterals. All the Saints needed was a John Carney extra point to send the game into overtime.



                      Guess what happened? Cost us a chance at playoffs that year. First ever missed PAT by Carney.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Bernard Pollard taking out Brady's knee.

                        Brady went out, Cassell went in, he started to play well, then McDaniels went to Denver and Pioli to Chiefs. McDaniels wanted Cassell because he liked the way he played in his system, which caused Cutler to want a trade. Pioli then got the man he wanted in Cassel for the chiefs, which allowed them to not draft a QB early in the first and take both Tyson Jackson last year and Eric Berry this year. Cutler was dealt to Chicago, who hasn't had a first round pick in the past two years. Chicago, being the graveyard for QB's that it is, got to watch a very inconsistent, and at times downright despicable, series of games from Cutler. Denver, meanwhile, wound up with Orton and multiple first round picks, two of which were used to draft players that have been somewhat disappointing, and another pick used to draft the most controversial prospect the NFL has seen in a while; this coming after they also acquired the once-talented but scarcely-allowed-to-perform Brady Quinn. The Tebow pick will probably define McDaniels future career. If he develops well, McDaniels is a genius. If he busts, as many think he will, McDaniels is the biggest doofus of a HC in recent history.

                        Pollard got released from the Chiefs and got a nice deal from Houston, where he surprised many and played well. He then went on to participate in the play that resulted in Wes Welkers season-ending injury, once again seriously damaging the knee of a key Patriots player. As was the case two years ago, this loss ultimately cost the Patriots a true chance to become champions.

                        And it all happened because Bernard Pollard was either tripped, pushed down, or played dirty, and injured Tom Brady's knee.
                        Last edited by Mr. Goosemahn; 07-12-2010, 01:46 PM.

                        Props to clover_jeez!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by 7DnBrnc53 View Post
                          Well, if Brady doesn't get hurt, Cassel doesn't play. And that probably would mean that Cutler is still in Denver, and Tebow is with another team.
                          I suppose that's true. I probably would have realized it if Cutler, Cassel, and Tebow had actually done something like play at a high level all of a sudden. But if you think about it, nothing has really changed between the Patriots, Broncos, Chiefs, or even Bears if you want to throw them in. Then again, it's only been one season.

                          "Every light must fade, every heart return to darkness!"
                          -San Francisco 49ers: Five Time Super Bowl Champions-
                          Originally posted by Borat
                          Oh, my bad. Didn't realize SWDC was the pinnacle of class and grace.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            1990 Bills

                            Another pivotal play happened in Week 4 of the 1990 season, which, quite possibly, could have been the most pivotal play of the 90's.

                            The 2-1 Bills and 2-1 Broncos met in Rich Stadium for an important AFC game. Denver was on a two-game winning streak after losing at the Raiders on opening day. The Bills were 2-1, but their loss was a 30-7 blowout at Miami in Week 2, a game that saw people like Bruce Smith and Darryl Talley being pulled early, much to their displeasure(Talley talks about this on the 90 Bills Missing Rings episode).

                            The year before, Buffalo was known as the "Bickering Bills", as they struggled to a 9-7 campaign and a first-round playoff exit in Cleveland. That Miami loss seemed to bring those issues to the forefront again. And when Denver jumped out to a 21-9 lead early in the fourth quarter, the game seemed over. Darryl Talley said that he was wondering when the starters were going to be pulled. Denver had a short FG attempt that would have put the game away. Then, this happens:

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSzUzcg8EdM

                            The Bills would go on to win the game 29-28 in dramatic fashion, and then win two more home games with fourth quarter comebacks against the Raiders and Jets to run their record to 5-1. That winning streak, it could be argued, propelled them to SB XXV, and then to the next three Super Bowls as well. All because of one FG returned for a TD.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by 7DnBrnc53 View Post
                              Another pivotal play happened in Week 4 of the 1990 season, which, quite possibly, could have been the most pivotal play of the 90's.

                              The 2-1 Bills and 2-1 Broncos met in Rich Stadium for an important AFC game. Denver was on a two-game winning streak after losing at the Raiders on opening day. The Bills were 2-1, but their loss was a 30-7 blowout at Miami in Week 2, a game that saw people like Bruce Smith and Darryl Talley being pulled early, much to their displeasure(Talley talks about this on the 90 Bills Missing Rings episode).

                              The year before, Buffalo was known as the "Bickering Bills", as they struggled to a 9-7 campaign and a first-round playoff exit in Cleveland. That Miami loss seemed to bring those issues to the forefront again. And when Denver jumped out to a 21-9 lead early in the fourth quarter, the game seemed over. Darryl Talley said that he was wondering when the starters were going to be pulled. Denver had a short FG attempt that would have put the game away. Then, this happens:

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSzUzcg8EdM

                              The Bills would go on to win the game 29-28 in dramatic fashion, and then win two more home games with fourth quarter comebacks against the Raiders and Jets to run their record to 5-1. That winning streak, it could be argued, propelled them to SB XXV, and then to the next three Super Bowls as well. All because of one FG returned for a TD.
                              Biscuit. Really underrated player.

                              "Every light must fade, every heart return to darkness!"
                              -San Francisco 49ers: Five Time Super Bowl Champions-
                              Originally posted by Borat
                              Oh, my bad. Didn't realize SWDC was the pinnacle of class and grace.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Drew Bledsoe injury that lead to Tom Brady starting.

                                It probably would have happened anyway, but the Patroits supporting cast might not have been as dominant by that point and could have missed out on their rings.

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