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Pivotal plays in NFL History

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  • #61
    Originally posted by 7DnBrnc53 View Post
    This thread is about plays that altered the course of a franchise.

    For example, the Tom Brady injury in 2008(that altered not only New England's future, but possibly also Denver's and several other teams as well).

    Also, I have another one: Vernon Perry's FG block and return against San Diego in the 1979 playoffs. The Chargers were about to go up 10-0 in the second quarter when Oiler Safety Vernon Perry changed the momentum of the entire game with a FG block and a 50+ yard return to around the SD 30. The Oilers were able to win the game 17-14, and go on to Pittsburgh for the AFC Title game.

    If that FG is made, the Chargers probably would have gone on to win against a banged-up Oiler team that was missing Pastorini and Earl Campbell. The next week, they would have hosted Pittsburgh. Both teams had 12-4 records, but the Chargers beat the Steelers 35-7 at home that year. If they would have won, they would have played the Rams that year in the SB, who they defeated 40-16 that year in Week 8. A SB win for the Chargers in 79 may have been the start of a new dynasty. I think that they could have repeated the next year, and maybe that would have led to Fred Dean and JJ getting new deals before the 1981 season. If Dean doesn't go to SF, they may have had a harder time winning the SB, and maybe Cincy, Dallas, or the Chargers win that year. As a result, the Niner Dynasty might never have gotten off the ground, and the West Coast Offense wouldn't have been as widespread.
    How the **** do you remember your name when you log in?

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Job View Post
      How the **** do you remember your name when you log in?
      What the heck are you talking about?

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      • #63
        It looks like the serial number for my PC, which I can't remember.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by 7DnBrnc53 View Post
          The West Coast Offense wasn't created in reaction to the zone. I never said that. And, the Niners didn't pioneer it. Actually, the system that should be called the "West Coast" offense(the one that is now called the "Air Coryell" system) is the one that Sid Gillman pioneered with the AFL Chargers, which is more of a vertical game. Al Davis, a Gillman assistant, took the system to the Raiders.

          Here is where Walsh comes in: He was a running backs coach with the 66 Raiders, so, when he went to Cincinnati in 1968 to be an offensive assistant, I imagine that he took the principles of that offense with him. In 1969, the Bengals drafted a QB #1 out of Cincinnati U by the name of Greg Cook. The strong-armed Cook was supposed to be the QB of Walsh's offense for years to come. Then, against the Chiefs, he hurt his shoulder. He played through it the whole season, but in doing so, he tore his rotator cuff.

          The archaic surgery procedures couldn't do anything about it, so he ended up retiring in 73 after a few unsuccessful comeback attempts. So, in 1970, Walsh had to move away from the concepts of the original "West Coast" offense because Cook was gone. His QB's would be Sam Wyche and Virgil Carter, who didn't have Cook's arm strength or ability. So, he implemented a short passing game, and used more passes to the backs. That was the beginning of the offense that would benefit QB's like Ken Anderson, Joe Montana, and Steve Young in the future.

          Here are some Wikipedia articles(I know that Wiki isn't the best, but these links also have links to other articles):

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Coast_Offense

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Coryell
          Everyone already knows this story, and you did nothing to answer the question at hand.

          Way to regurgitate irrelevant information that most people already know.

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          • #65
            Whatever

            Originally posted by yourfavestoner View Post
            Everyone already knows this story, and you did nothing to answer the question at hand.

            Way to regurgitate irrelevant information that most people already know.
            Whatever you say.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by 7DnBrnc53 View Post

              Also, I have another one: Vernon Perry's FG block and return against San Diego in the 1979 playoffs. The Chargers were about to go up 10-0 in the second quarter when Oiler Safety Vernon Perry changed the momentum of the entire game with a FG block and a 50+ yard return to around the SD 30. The Oilers were able to win the game 17-14, and go on to Pittsburgh for the AFC Title game.

              If that FG is made, the Chargers probably would have gone on to win against a banged-up Oiler team that was missing Pastorini and Earl Campbell. The next week, they would have hosted Pittsburgh. Both teams had 12-4 records, but the Chargers beat the Steelers 35-7 at home that year. If they would have won, they would have played the Rams that year in the SB, who they defeated 40-16 that year in Week 8. A SB win for the Chargers in 79 may have been the start of a new dynasty. I think that they could have repeated the next year, and maybe that would have led to Fred Dean and JJ getting new deals before the 1981 season. If Dean doesn't go to SF, they may have had a harder time winning the SB, and maybe Cincy, Dallas, or the Chargers win that year. As a result, the Niner Dynasty might never have gotten off the ground, and the West Coast Offense wouldn't have been as widespread.


              My family still talks about this game. I guess it is their version of the 2006 meltdown.

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              • #67
                Whatever

                Originally posted by Job View Post
                It looks like the serial number for my PC, which I can't remember.
                Good for you.

                Another pivotal play occurred in the 1990 NFC Title Game when Roger Craig fumbled the ball and LT recovered. If the Niners run out the clock and go to the Super Bowl, I think that Buffalo could have knocked them off. They matched up better with San Francisco that year. The Bills had problems in the Super Bowl against more physical NFC East teams. And, there was a good chance that Montana may not have played in the game after the Leonard Marshall hit.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by Boss+Manning=Banning View Post
                  I won't go that far. As a Giants fan, it was a great and memorable play, but let's keep it in perspective. That play only got us a first down. From 3-5 to 1st and 10 on the Pats side of the field. After that, they still had a 3rd and long on us, and chances to stop us. We still had to score. It's not like Tyree caught it in the endzone, to win it. We still had to score, and they still had chances to stop us. It was a great play and memorable, perhaps even epic. But at the end of the day, it only gave us a first down.
                  You're insane.

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                  • #69
                    Scott Norwood's missed 41 yd fg in the Superbowl probably changes a ton of perceptions of the Bills, Giants, Jim Kelley, Bill Parcells....for years to come.

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                    • #70
                      In the Peyton Manning era, the defining play of the Indianapolis Colts would have to be "The Block". The play has all the elements of a defining moment. It was the AFC Championship Game (huge stakes) against the Colts' nemesis (huge rivalry), and it seemed to be the best chance the Colts had yet to win a championship, until of course they got down 21-3 (huge comeback). Then Peyton Manning figured out the no huddle offense would gas an aging Patriots defense, the Colts got a couple of breaks, and the largest comeback in Conference Championship history culminated on the aforementioned play. The Colts, down by 3 with 1:02 left in the game, had a 3rd and 2 that was essentially a must convert (situation team has struggled in previously), as the Patriots had two timeouts, and a field goal gives the Patriots the ball back with time enough to try to drive for a field goal of their own to win the game. The Colts, as they had the previous two plays, decide to run the ball. Jeff Saturday makes an amazing block of Vince Wilfork, takes him to the ground, and creates the gaping hole that allows Addai to "walk in for the touchdown", per Jim Nantz. This play gave the Colts the lead for the first time in the game, and put the Patriots in a situation they'd never faced in a playoff game to that point: they needed a TD to win, and had less than a minute of game time to get it. On the ensuing drive, Marlin Jackson intercepts Tom Brady's pass, the RCA Dome erupts in a deafening roar (I know, I was there), and the rest, as they say, is history.

                      Overall in Colts history, I don't see how the final play of "The Greatest Game Ever Played" could NOT be the defining play of Colts' history, considering it's a defining moment in NFL history.


                      The problem arises when people use statistics like a drunk uses a lamp post: for support instead of illumination.

                      If luck is where preparation meets opportunity, then clutch is where failure meets luck.

                      <Add1ct> setting myself on fire can't be that hard
                      <Add1ct> but tackling a mosquito might prove a challenge

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by WinslowBodden View Post
                        You're insane.
                        Slightly, but I have to admit it does open doors.

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