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  • Originally posted by D-Unit View Post
    I didn't like Haley when he was with us. I don't like him now either. I still want Shanahan.
    The thing is, it would be a shame to have someone like Wade Phillips let go of the defense. If we were to fire Wade in favor of someone like Shanahan, i'd have to stipulate that he work with a DC i'd hire before. I know some people don't like to hire coordinators before, but i really can't remember the last time Shanahan coached a good defensive team.

    Also, it's extremely easy to look good when you have Kurt Warner throwing the ball to Larry Fitzgerald all game.

    Originally posted by LonghornsLegend View Post
    Yea I guess your right to an extent, but anytime Jerry is silent on a big name player there is always something else going on, when rumors were swirling last off-season about Barber being traded Jerry jumped at the chance to tell people they were crazy in thinking that, he didn't know where these rumors were coming from and we had full intentions on keeping Barber.


    Knowing TO's personality I'm pretty sure Jerry would want to squash this rumor before it even picks up steam if he knew confidently he was coming back, but I really think it's a big decision still to be made and he hasn't decided...Frankly if you listen to all the quotes and read in between the lines I'd say it's leaning towards him being gone, at least that's the feeling I'm getting.
    There has been plenty of rumors that have never been addressed. I'm just saying, let's not look too much into the fact that Jerry hasn't come out and confirmed or denied reports. Look around the league and see how many teams respond to media reports like that. It just doesn't happen.

    Comment


    • Well, I know Garrett sucked bad this season, but I will hold my judgment on him. It seems that he's gonna stay so I will support him, hoping that he can get better. Garrett is a very smart guy, and smart guys learn from their mistakes. Now he has his backs against the wall, I hope he can find some motivation and make all of us eat crow.
      So my approach for the new season is: don't worry 'bout a thing, 'cause every little thing gonna be alright :D


      In Bob We Trust

      John Madden's wedding video business

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ddPHJWkPvU

      Comment


      • My question to garrett is....how hard do you have to think about it to give the ball to Felix Jones. He was averaging over 9 yards a carry up until that game...and to not give him an touches when we needed an explosive play...just makes me wonder....how smart is he really? Obviously it doesn't take a rocket scientist to give an explosive player the ball....That redskins game was the end of my trust in Garrett...he has to earn it back...he is right where Stewart was last year for me.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by LonghornsLegend View Post
          I think Haley will make a better Head Coach then Sean Payton, and as far as leadership is concerned he could run a team a whole lot better then Garrett seems like he could and that's a big concern for me over x's and o's sometimes...I don't think Haley is going to be the next great thing, but I do think he's going to make a fine head coach and at this point it's obvious he's not letting any prima donna's run him or his team and we need more of that going on around here.
          How in the world would you know this? And to say that he would be better than a coach that took his team to the NFC Championship game in his first season is kinda silly, IMO. Is there a chance he could be better, sure, but there is absolutely nothing that would indicate he would.


          I don't know what gives you the impression that players wouldn't respect and play hard for him, Mike Smith went down to Atlanta with that same passion and those players love him to death and have the utmost respect for him, it's not that hard if your that type of guy but we have alot of passive guys in house it seems.
          First, Mike Smith is not an immature hot-head like Haley is; two different personalities.

          What I'm saying is that today's player does not tend to favor hot-headed coaches. Big Bill himself told JJ that if they didn't have success quickly, his style of coaching would wear on players quickly. Even Bill knows the impact that style has on players. And I think Bill could get away with it for longer because he is Bill Parcells. Can you imagine what a veteran team like the Ravens would do if mid-way through a season, Haley started yelling and screaming when the team started facing some adversity?! They would eat him alive.

          Look, he may end up being a great coach. I just think it's comical that everyone is so gung ho for a guy that had some great weapons on offense yet could only finish 9-7 and win a horrible division. Not to mention how they played on the road this year, outside of Carolina.
          In war, you win or lose, live or die - and the difference is just an eyelash.


          -Douglas MacArthur

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Macarthur View Post
            How in the world would you know this? And to say that he would be better than a coach that took his team to the NFC Championship game in his first season is kinda silly, IMO. Is there a chance he could be better, sure, but there is absolutely nothing that would indicate he would.
            I don't know that, it's just my opinion.


            And I never said that he would be better then Mike Smith, my point was that Mike Smith became a leader of that team from an assistant and nobody really saw that coming, so I don't think it's all that hard to conceive that Haley ends up being a good team leader.


            I do know that he certainly deserves his shot when you look around the league and see who is getting Head Coaching jobs.


            Look, he may end up being a great coach. I just think it's comical that everyone is so gung ho for a guy that had some great weapons on offense yet could only finish 9-7 and win a horrible division. Not to mention how they played on the road this year, outside of Carolina.

            And that's entirely his fault? Again I'm not "gung ho" for the guy, but he's certainly more qualified then alot of guys that have been given chances lately and it has worked out out well for them...He deserves a shot.





            Originally posted by Scott Wright
            I guarantee that if someone picks Cam Newton in the Top 5 they will regret it.

            Comment


            • Hiring Haley is about as likely as seeing the comet.

              It would require too much crow eating by the organization and some of its players.

              Can't see this in a million years (not saying a bad idea thought) -- juss not happin.

              Comment


              • This is awesome


                Nice TO

                Comment


                • Originally posted by thule View Post
                  This is awesome


                  Nice TO
                  How is it awesome?

                  I must be missing something.

                  Comment


                  • Jerry Jones taking pictures with hot chicks...and TO dropping money on strippers is funny in my head idk....just because I don't look at them like normal people i guess.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by thule View Post
                      Jerry Jones taking pictures with hot chicks...and TO dropping money on strippers is funny in my head idk....just because I don't look at them like normal people i guess.
                      OK. I thought you were making a football point. Just a "nice to live large" point.

                      Comment


                      • http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=3863021

                        Former NFL coach Dan Reeves has been in discussions with the Dallas Cowboys about a consultant's role, according to sources.
                        I'm excigted about the possibility of Reeves coming in to consult with the team. I'm not sure we'd want him "buying the groceries" though. What's the general concensus re: Dan Reeve's drafting prowess?

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by BX View Post
                          I'm excigted about the possibility of Reeves coming in to consult with the team. I'm not sure we'd want him "buying the groceries" though. What's the general concensus re: Dan Reeve's drafting prowess?
                          Have fun with all the Vick-to-the-Cowboys rumors

                          Pick the Winners Champion 2008 | 2011

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by BX View Post
                            http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=3863021
                            I'm excigted about the possibility of Reeves coming in to consult with the team. I'm not sure we'd want him "buying the groceries" though. What's the general concensus re: Dan Reeve's drafting prowess?
                            The word re-tred in the dictionary has a picture of Reeves next to it.

                            Sad you need to hire a guy to do what Player Personnel and Coaching should automatically do. Weed them out before the fact and keep them in line after the fact.

                            If they make this move (which I don't get) all it is saying is you have the wrong coaches and wrong player personnel people with "problem" players all over the place.

                            Wrong message.

                            Comment


                            • I remember I called awhile back the signing of Michael Hawkins the former OU DB standout and Packers 5th rd pick a few years ago, I know once he became available we would look to scoop him up on the PS....His story was posted on dmn, I'll post here if anyone is interested:



                              By RACHEL COHEN

                              Micheal Hawkins ricochets through a life so cursed yet so charmed.

                              He could be living on the streets. Or starting at cornerback for Oklahoma.

                              He could be selling pest control services door-to-door. Or starring in the NFL.

                              Today, the 22-year-old Dallas native inhabits scenes of childhood daydreams, of "I wanna be a football player when I grow up." Today, he is a promising draft pick at Green Bay Packers training camp.

                              Tomorrow? It's true these charmed moments have not lingered before. Hawkins will pledge only this: He won't be an inevitable outcome, another kid from a fractured family dismissed as doomed from the start. He is a parent now, and no way is he passing on that curse to his child.

                              "I don't love football. I don't love it like other people love it. I do it because I'm good. I do it because that's what God blessed me to change my life, to change that cycle that I have in my family," Hawkins said.

                              "I play it for the love of my daughter and just to show my daughter how much passion I have to do something."

                              On a fall day nearly four years ago, Hawkins, then a senior at Carrollton R.L. Turner, waxed hopeful about his impending college football career. He was as he remains now, defiant and cocky, thoughtful and articulate.

                              "It will be a whole new start," he told The Dallas Morning News then. "I can't say I'm leaving the past behind. But I can go somewhere and not deal with it."

                              Yet starts and finishes, past and future, never seem to align in any logical order for Hawkins. Who would believe these snapshots of his life belong to the same person?

                              Summer 2000: Hawkins is homeless for several weeks, a 17-year-old who has never played a high school football game, sleeping in parks after fleeing an abusive father.

                              Summer 2001: Hawkins is one of the nation's top cornerback recruits heading into his senior year of high school.

                              Summer 2003: Hawkins is working odd jobs, seemingly done with football, back in Dallas after clashing with coaches in his lone season at OU.

                              Summer 2005: Hawkins signs a four-year contract with a $144,000 bonus after the Packers draft him in the fifth round, even though he hasn't played traditional football in more than two years.

                              'I was never satisfied'

                              "So that rascal finally made it to the NFL?"

                              The president of Garland-based Summit Pest Control Inc. sounded downright tickled at the news about his former employee.

                              Arch Smith knew that the kid who answered a newspaper ad two years ago used to play college football, but never found out if he was any good. Not that it mattered.

                              "I was more interested in his attitude and willingness to work and listen to instruction," Smith said. "That's what I needed, and he was a very impressive young man."

                              Hawkins had left OU after the 2002 season with an infant daughter to support. He confronted the question that had haunted him since he was 12 and lost his grandmother, who raised him and sheltered him with so much love.

                              Where was home?

                              Not with his father, with whom he went to live after his grandmother's death. Not with his mother, who, Hawkins has said, battled drug addiction.

                              The answer was the same one that had rescued him from the streets - Trinia Roberts, a former neighbor and friend's mother.

                              His first unannounced appearance at her door launched a life-changing series of events: going to live with her brother and sister-in-law; enrolling at Turner; joining the football team; becoming a blue-chip recruit.

                              This time, he stayed at her North Dallas apartment.

                              "When you look around society now, the majority of teenagers and young guys out there are hanging out on the streets, doing drugs. Micheal isn't like that," said Roberts, who works as a collector for delinquent auto loans. "You couldn't help but reach out to him."

                              Hawkins figured he was through with football, and that was OK. At least that's what he told himself. He worked at a car dealership and at a Wendy's. But, no, this wasn't right. This wasn't how the streets-to-Sooners tale was supposed to end, with the protagonist hawking Nissans.

                              "God didn't bring me through all the things I've been through to be selling no cars," Hawkins said. "That's not knocking cars, because some people, they're good at it, that's what they do.

                              "I was never satisfied. I was content sometimes, but I was never satisfied."

                              From AFL to NFL draft

                              A friend's uncle had played arena football, which inspired the idea to attend an open tryout with the Desperados in November 2003. Out of more than 400 hopefuls, Hawkins was one of two to make the cut. He earned about $30,000 his first season.

                              Hawkins didn't play much in parts of two seasons with the team, but he met a player named Cedric Bonner who mentioned Hawkins' talent to his agent, Fort Worth-based Alex Balic. When Balic learned Hawkins was only three years out of high school, he suggested he apply for the NFL draft.

                              Hawkins' name appeared on the early entry list, sending scouts such as the Packers' Alonzo Highsmith scrambling to figure out who this guy was. Highsmith, a former Cowboys running back, is friends with OU assistant coach Jackie Shipp, who told him Hawkins was one of the best athletes to come through the program in his time there.

                              That got Highsmith's attention. He left a message for Hawkins through the Turner coaches.

                              "One day," Highsmith said, "out of the clear blue sky, he calls me."

                              Highsmith arranged to have Hawkins participate in SMU's pro timing day. Hawkins ran a 4.3-second 40-yard dash, which really got Highsmith's attention. Highsmith took Hawkins to lunch, and the two chatted for nearly two hours.

                              Highsmith did his research into why Hawkins didn't stick at OU.

                              "It wasn't drugs. It wasn't alcohol," Highsmith said. "It wasn't those types of problems. I think it was immaturity and him not knowing what was expected of him."

                              Run-in with a Stoops

                              Mike Stoops understands. Why would Micheal Hawkins trust authority figures?

                              "He's had no family structure whatsoever, nobody to trust growing up," said Stoops, Hawkins' position coach at OU. "On the street, something you learn is not to trust a lot of people."

                              But football programs are built on trust. Hawkins said the coaching staff overreacted to him missing a weightlifting session after visiting his newborn daughter. Stoops, now the coach at Arizona, responded that Hawkins struggled to differentiate between being punished and being asked to make up a missed obligation.

                              "Coaching has a lot of tough love that goes with it," Stoops said. "He never felt secure enough to handle it."

                              Hawkins also felt Stoops' coaching style was too personal. Once, when he botched a drill in practice, Hawkins said Stoops told him "that I'm going to go back to Dallas and be like my mom."

                              Stoops denied saying that and called such a comment inappropriate.

                              "When you cross boundaries, when you say certain things, then that's when I'm going to get into you, coach or no coach," Hawkins said. "You don't respect me, I don't respect you."

                              Hawkins played as a freshman in 2002, returning an interception for a touchdown in a blowout win over UT-El Paso. But his college career ended unceremoniously, just as his high school playing days had. Hawkins said he quit Turner's squad after seven games his senior year instead of serving a one-game suspension for an argument with a teammate.

                              When Hawkins was staying with Roberts, she worried that his temper could cause him problems. Now she believes he has harnessed it. Desperados coach Will McClay said Hawkins took feedback personally at first but was learning to accept criticism.

                              Hawkins doesn't anticipate any run-ins with NFL coaches, saying they'll treat him like a professional, and he'll act like one. But what if he believes someone crosses that line?

                              "You could be President Bush - if you bring something personal up with me, I'm going to go right back at you," he said.

                              Coming back to family

                              A young man hardened beyond his years goes mushy at the mention of a little girl. Her name is Makhia, and she turned 3 on Aug.9. She lives with her mother and grandmother in Irving, and whenever she see guys in pads and helmets on TV, she exclaims, "My daddy plays football!"

                              Her daddy talks to her on the phone every day and would like for her to come to Green Bay for a game. He just worries about her ears hurting on the plane.

                              Asked what he hopes to provide for his daughter, Hawkins said, "Give her the best, in all aspects, as far as being a father: life, dreams, all that type of stuff. There's nothing more disappointing than when you've got a father out there who can't do nothing for his kids."

                              Tiffany Parson, Hawkins' high school girlfriend, said he does all he can to help her and their daughter. She can sense Hawkins sees in Makhia the family life he missed.

                              Hawkins said he's not in contact with his father but sees his mother, Noreen, and older brother, Rondell, often. He spent his 22nd birthday with them in Cleburne, but he was the one buying them clothes.

                              So poised, so candid about everything else, Hawkins turns hesitant, uncomfortable when pressed about his mother and brother. He acknowledges that his mother has spent time in jail, but he is passionate about defending her.

                              "She's made some bad choices in life, just like anybody," Hawkins said. "My mom's a good person, a real good person."

                              He says he'd toss aside his NFL career in an instant for the kind of family he has mostly peered at from afar, where home is never a mystery and trust never an object of doubt. He is also adamant about pointing out how many people have supported and sustained him, who have even allowed him to speak the language of family. So it feels good and right to call Roberts his aunt.

                              Impressive debut

                              The Packers had 11 picks in the seven rounds of this year's draft, including two in the fifth. It was the perfect situation to gamble on a player with Hawkins' upside, said Green Bay director of pro personnel Reggie McKenzie.

                              Hawkins is 6-1, 179 pounds. He's not just fast, scouts and coaches rave, he boasts remarkable skills for closing on the ball.

                              Stoops dared utter the words Deion Sanders. "His natural ability is off the charts," Stoops said.

                              In his first day of minicamp in April, Hawkins intercepted a pass. McKenzie said Green Bay's staff was impressed by how quickly he picked up the system and how developed his technique was.

                              Durability is a concern, though, especially after Hawkins missed the second minicamp because of minor knee surgery.

                              "The coaches felt like, 'Hey, we can work with this guy,'" McKenzie said.

                              Training camp started, and Hawkins kept turning heads. No longer is the question, "Can he play?" but, "How much will he play?"

                              Word out of Green Bay is he will probably be used as an extra defensive back in nickel and dime packages.

                              But there is one certainty in Micheal Hawkins' life. Asked what he hopes his daughter will say of him when she's older, Hawkins didn't hesitate: "I wouldn't ask for no other father than my dad."

                              "That's it," he said. "I don't need her to say I was a good football player."

                              He's not really anyone to get super excited over, but he does have starting potential if he can stay healthy for sure, durability is a big concern with him.





                              Originally posted by Scott Wright
                              I guarantee that if someone picks Cam Newton in the Top 5 they will regret it.

                              Comment


                              • I wouldnt mind Reeves at all...if you want to keep Garrett, than why not get him a true mentor? Just have Garrett hang around Reeves at all times. This move would def. be made more so for Garrett than to aid Wade, imo. Reeves certainly could teach Wade a few things but again, Garrett would have the most to gain and I think that would be the primary reason for such an addition.

                                Thanks BoneKrusher^

                                http://youtube.com/watch?v=6_j52DziMy4 (the man)
                                http://youtube.com/watch?v=2g6S3Anto7c
                                KO KNOWS

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