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  • Believe me you don't want him being a CB, he instant burnt toast in coverage

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    • http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shu...urn=nfl-wp1898

      Did you guys know about this? Kind of cool.

      R.I.P. Junior Seau

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      • Originally posted by ElectricEye View Post
        http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shu...urn=nfl-wp1898

        Did you guys know about this? Kind of cool.
        Yeah, they've reportedly been pretty close since they both attended the Manning camp last summer. Alex Smith seems to be the kind of guy that would go out of his way to work with him as well. I see Kaepernick as one who will be getting alot of info to sponge before the lockout is lifted.

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        • http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shu...urn=nfl-wp1898

          Did you guys know about this? Kind of coo
          l

          That is pretty cool though.At least Ck is all gun ho about this learning our new system and getting a head start.Gets me more liking the guy since he will have the work ethic already in place and a good coach.It must going to pretty simple play book if Luck can teach him this early or at least just about the same to the Standford play book.

          It would be pretty crazy if CK beat out A.Smith for a starting job.Though it might to early to let him start unless if he can run it pretty well and have good accurate numbers in pre season.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by ElectricEye View Post
            http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shu...urn=nfl-wp1898

            Did you guys know about this? Kind of cool.
            Writers are STRUGGLING to find something to write about, especially now since the draft is over. So I think that is what this article mostly is about.

            Kaepernick and Luck might do a little talking back and forth, but I doubt it will be anything more than that.

            On a side note, I wouldn't be surprised if somehow Kaepernick is the starter at the beginning of the season, but I expect Alex's experience, and lack of mini-camps, to make him the starter.

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            • Secret Superstar: Chilo Rachal, San Francisco 49ers

              Following the 2009 season, it was pretty clear the 49ers had some problems with their offensive line.

              So it was no surprise when they used two first round picks to bring in Anthony Davis and Mike Iupati. It wasnít even a surprise that both men found themselves starting all 16 games and becoming the talk of the unit: Davis for his sub-standard play, and Iupati for his punishing run blocking.

              But there were other stories on the line. While 49er fans bemoaned losing Joe Staley to injury for a large portion of the season, and saw the highs (run blocking) and lows (pass protection) in David Bassí switch to center, their best performer went quietly unnoticed.

              Itís with little surprise, therefore, that our Secret Superstar for the San Francisco 49ers is none other than right guard, Chilo Rachal....

              [continues here]
              Well...that was unexpected!

              Comment


              • Originally posted by BandwagonPunditry View Post
                Well...that was unexpected!
                This caught on a bit when it was released back in March. I take it as an aspect to consider (especially those that love to bash Rachal.) However, PFF uses almost entirely statistical analysis at times and can also be taken with a grain of salt.

                Regardless, I think Rachal tended to be a scapegoat in a lot of instances and I believe that he has become more and more consistent. If this trend continues, the youth, and power on the 49ers young line could deem exciting.

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                • Originally posted by phlysac View Post
                  This caught on a bit when it was released back in March. I take it as an aspect to consider (especially those that love to bash Rachal.) However, PFF uses almost entirely statistical analysis at times and can also be taken with a grain of salt.

                  Regardless, I think Rachal tended to be a scapegoat in a lot of instances and I believe that he has become more and more consistent. If this trend continues, the youth, and power on the 49ers young line could deem exciting.
                  They lost their credibility when they got their information incorrect. Rachal didn't get back into the lineup because of Adam Snyder not performing, it was because of the injury to Tony Pashos. Rachal's inline blocking is adequate, but that's about it not very good pulling and horrendous in pass protection.
                  Originally posted by 49erNation85
                  I dunno even half of those guys why did we sign them jeez.

                  Comment


                  • http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article...p=all&tc=pgall

                    Great read from Eric Branch about Tomsula. Hoping him and Leavitt can really turn Smith into something great.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Verloren View Post
                      http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article...p=all&tc=pgall

                      Great read from Eric Branch about Tomsula. Hoping him and Leavitt can really turn Smith into something great.
                      Great article!

                      Nice to see mention of Woodie High. Not only can produce quality NFL players (most of any HS in 2010), but also quality coaches as well.

                      Comment


                      • All the rookies have their numbers, except Aldon

                        http://49ers.pressdemocrat.com/2011/...umbers-called/

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                        • Great read on Donatell. He also somewhat confirms my suspicions about our CB picks in the draft being guys we really had our eye on all along.....

                          The only players Donatell has been able to coach thus far during his time with the 49ers are the prospects he scouted for the draft. The 49ers brought in several prospects, including Patrick Peterson and Prince Amukamara, for visits. Donatell also spoke at length with the two defensive backs the 49ers drafted.

                          "We sat down at dinner and talked a lot and I definitely learned a lot from him, looking at tape, learning different formations and everything," said Culliver, whom the 49ers selected with the No. 80 overall selection.

                          "So I definitely feel like he's going to be a coach that can teach me a lot and I can learn a lot from him."
                          http://www.csnbayarea.com/05/10/11/D...95&feedID=5936
                          Last edited by VAfy-ya; 05-10-2011, 10:39 PM.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by VAfy-ya View Post
                            Great read on Donatell. He also somewhat confirms my suspicions about our CB picks in the draft being guys we really had our eye on all along.....



                            http://www.csnbayarea.com/05/10/11/D...95&feedID=5936
                            I can at least understand the pick of Culliver now. At least he has the size and speed to potentially be a starting DB at one point in his career. And Donatell is a quality secondary coach too. Lets see how it plays out now.

                            Comment


                            • Some quotes from Trent Baalke during his draft pick film session with beat writers...

                              Lights! Camera! Draft picks! Baalke reviews 49ers draft class

                              In a darkened meeting room this morning, Trent Baalke paused the movie during a favorite action sequence: Nevada quarterback Colin Kaepernick rolled to his left, stared down pressure from a Cal defender and delivered the ball on a line to a receiver 20 yards downfield.

                              Nothing in Kaepernick’s delivery was quite as a coach would draw it up – the passer was flushed out of the pocket and never able to set his feet. As a defender barreled in, Kaepernick was forced to throw the ball at a three-quarters delivery instead of over the top.

                              But to Baalke, the 49ers’ general manager, Kaepernick’s ad lib is what made the scene so great. He hit the pause button again.

                              “A quarterback has to be able to work through chaos. If a quarterback can’t sort through that, he’s not going to make it in the National Football League,’’ Baalke said. “Watch here.”

                              The film rolls again and Kaepernick is on the move.

                              “He’s got quick feet in the pocket and then the throws a B.B. even though he never gets his shoulders squared downfield. You look for a quarterback who can throw of his back foot, who can change his arm angle.”

                              This highlight clip was part of the 49ers’ second annual post-draft review – loosely defined as the Trent Baalke Film Festival. The G.M. met with about a dozen writers to show what he and other 49ers scouts saw during their pre-draft evaluations.

                              Equipped with a laser pointer and center stage, Baalke broke down three or four plays from each of the 10 of players the 49ers selected last month. (This was, by design, a feel-good movie – “I’m not going to spend time talking about what a guy doesn’t do,’’ Baalke acknowledged.)

                              Here, then, is a close-up of every draft pick with Baalke providing the narration:

                              OLB Aldon Smith, Missouri (first round): “You look at the versatility he brings to the table. He’s played inside. He’s played outside. He’s got good quickness off the ball and he has those 36-inch arms. (Smith beats Colorado left tackle Nate Solder with an inside move and then hauls down the QB for a sack.) You look at the quickness. One thing that I’m looking for in a defensive player is a guy that can play to the football with his eyes. You watch Aldon – you can watch a lot of snaps – and he rarely takes his eyes off the ballcarrier. If you watch him, he’s looking past the blocker He’s trying to find the football. He’s feeling the blocker, but just look at his eyes and where they stay. (Baalke mentions NFL standouts Willie McGinest, Shawne Merriman and Bryce Paup.) Does Aldon have some stiffness to him? Yes, but those guys did, too. He also has some unique flexibility. He can get his body in position that other guys can’t.
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              QB Colin Kaepernick, Nevada (second round). “He’s got good stature with excellent straight-line speed. His arm strength his unique – he has a big-time arm. (Against Boston College, Kaepernick rolls left and throws that direction.) That’s very hard to do. Try that. You’re running full speed to the opposite side of your arm action and you’re able to throw the ball with velocity and accuracy. (On his funky mechanics) It’s like a golf swing – all that matters is the end result. … We’re comfortable with his motion. There may be some teaching when it comes to protecting the football. (On a play against Hawaii, Kaepernick looks to his left before his eyes drift back to his right to find tight end Virgil Green downfield for a 25-yard gain.) Look at his eyes. He came back to his right and threw it over the first line of defense and dropped it into the hole. The whole time, he stood tall in the pocket. This is life in the NFL. … I want a guy confident enough to throw the ball into the defense. … (On his freelance ability) There are guys who need everything to be right. In the NFL, very seldom is everything right. They’ve got to be able to throw off their back foot. They’ve got to be able to drop their elbow and throw it out of the side window. So you’re looking for guys who can change those planes, whether it’s with the arm or with the feet. It’s not like you’re in the backyard playing catch.”
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              CB Chris Culliver, South Carolina. (third round): “He started 31 games in the SEC and seven last year at corner. Every game, he got better at the position. He got more comfortable. That’s what we’re looking for. … We like that he’s played both positions. He’s played nickel. He’s played the perimeter. He’s a 6-foot-plus corner who ran in the low 4.4s. … (On film, he makes a tackle in run support) One of the things you look for is the ability to transition – the guys who can put their foot down in the dirt and close with quickness. This is where his safety experience can help: He’s not afraid of contact.”
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              RB Kendall Hunter, Oklahoma State (fourth round): “We’re not looking at him as a change-of-pace back. We think he’s a four-down back. He can run the power game, he can get to the edge, he can catch a ball out of the backfield, he can pass-protect and he can return punts and kickoffs … (Breaks off a few runs against Washington State). He’s got a very good combination of quickness, strength and bursts. Is he a 4.3 guy? No. But he has very good competitive speed. You don’t see him get caught from behind. I really like the way he finishes his runs.
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              G Daniel Kilgore, Appalachian St. (fifth round): “He’s a left tackle that will move inside. One thing we like about him is the balance and strength that he has in his body. He has good feet.” (He takes on Florida’s right defensive end). What do guards have to do? They have to be able to operate in space — even if it’s against a defensive back or a linebacker, they have get the job done. (Is he a guard or a center?) He’s going to come in here as both. It’s hard to be a one-position backup player in this league.”
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              WR Ronald Johnson, USC (sixth round): (Lined up in the slot, he slips away from defenders against Virginia Tech). “We feel like we got good value in this pick. He’s a guy we feel can play the slot and play the ‘Z’ position for us and also has return value. … He’s another guy where we like his wiring. Everybody at USC talked about his passion for the game. … At this point in the draft, he was too good a value to turn down.”
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              S Colin Jones, Texas Christian (sixth round): “You see on film that he loves special teams. He’s the first guy down and loves contact. We’re going to throw him into the mix at strong safety, but his path to this team is on special teams. … Can he develop a niche on the defense? Can this guy develop into that dime linebacker role? Can he be an elite special teamer? That’s what we drafted him to do.”
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              FB Bruce Miller, Central Florida (seventh round): (His highlight film shows Miller making sacks as a defensive end, but he will be a fullback in the NFL). He is wired the way we want our guys wired. He plays the game 100 percent, every snap. This guy is football savvy and football smart. (He compared him to former Stanford linebacker Erik Lorig, who played FB last year for Tampa Bay). This guy gets a lot of his production with effort. He’s going to be a hard guy to cut from the 53-man roster because he’s going to be at practice early and he’s going to outwork most of the players on the practice field. Those guys are hard to cut.”
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              G Michael Person, Montana State (seventh): “He’s a little bit bigger than Kilgore. (A clip shows him protecting the quarterback’s blind side at LT.) You see him have nice balance, nice feet. You’re looking for a guy that does not lose very often at this level. You want somebody who dominates and makes it look easy. That’s what he does.”
                              __________________________________________________ ____________

                              CB Curtis Holcomb, Florida A&M (seventh round): He’s a four-time captain. You talk about wired right? I don’t think anybody in our building had ever heard of that. (He stays with a receiver on a deep route). This guy is a lot like Philip Adams, who we feel very good about. Can he cover the receiver? Does he have the quickness to close? He has good feet and hips.”
                              http://blogs.mercurynews.com/49ers/2...s-draft-class/
                              Last edited by phlysac; 05-13-2011, 03:55 PM.

                              Comment


                              • Some more info on our newest CB Holcomb....

                                Draft guru Mel Kiper didnít have Holcomb rated among his draft-eligible cornerbacks, but the 49ers, who put him through a private workout, werenít the only team that had Holcomb on their radar.

                                Taylor said at least four other teams, including the Jaguars and Packers, brought him in for a pre-draft visit.

                                Said Taylor, ďHe was very busy that last month.Ē
                                http://49ers.pressdemocrat.com/2011/...l-born-leader/

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