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How to start out as a rap artist

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  • #16
    Here We Come wasn't bad, I mean in comparison to what is mainstream now, but I think the beat was what helped that song. Rap is all about how badass you are, gunplay, cars, bitches, and cash.....that's what they talked about. I could easily see that song being done by anyone in G-unit, TI, Weezy, Game, etc....it sounded like other mainstream "gangsta" rap songs.

    I Hear You Talkin and Nuh UH were very weak. They had poor beats and simplistic lyrics, I have come up with lyrics better than those and mine is just something I write for no reason when I'm bored. The mic quality on The Sad Truth is atrocious, the beat is again pretty weak, which is ironic because they are talking about how weak some other guy's beats are. It basically sounded like some "beef" track somebody would record about somebody else in highschool, weak premises for hating each other, and don't sound hard with anything they say. At least say you are going to murder the guy if you are trying to be "gangsta." People fight everyday, it's not hardcore. They are mentioning what seems like a very small group of people that they seem to know personally which leads me to believe it is just some stupid highschool drama.

    I am done arguing, until somebody says something stupid.

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    • #17
      Well being signed doesn't mean alot unless it's with a label that can get you out there.
      Originally posted by njx9
      i invite all of you to spam the board with moronic topics that aren't even vaguely entertaining. please.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Vince Lombardi View Post
        Well being signed doesn't mean alot unless it's with a label that can get you out there.
        You get signed to make a CD, it doesnt mean my friends will get their CD produced.

        They werent signed because of those songs either, the songs were done with little to zero equipment out of a kitchen. They were signed on potential. The very last song was a free style aimed at a kid and doesnt need talked about any further because its just that.

        Do you guys honestly think you have to make a hit song and then get signed? How the hell do you make a hit song with no professional help or recording equipment?

        You think 50 made "In the club" and everyone happened to like it so they signed him?

        These guys started out at a free style joint, were liked, decided to record a couple songs on acid pro, sent them out and a couple production labels replied, one came down to see a concert of theirs at a local club and it went from there.

        If you honestly judge these songs as finished product, it shows the lack of knowledge for what it takes to make an artist and how they begin.

        The fact that they even are getting look at because there white is amazing enough, not to sound racist, but there arent very many white folks in this career.

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        • #19
          starting out as a gangsta rapper is tough, you see the hardcore ghetto gangster image takes a lot of practice, for instance if you're white you gotta keep in mind that you're not black like barry white but that you're white like frank black is.

          Sig by Fenikz

          I remember NFLDC
          don't tell anyone, but Charlie Casserly is a dope fiend

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JoeMontainya View Post
            You get signed to make a CD, it doesnt mean my friends will get their CD produced.

            They werent signed because of those songs either, the songs were done with little to zero equipment out of a kitchen. They were signed on potential. The very last song was a free style aimed at a kid and doesnt need talked about any further because its just that.

            Do you guys honestly think you have to make a hit song and then get signed? How the hell do you make a hit song with no professional help or recording equipment?

            You think 50 made "In the club" and everyone happened to like it so they signed him?

            These guys started out at a free style joint, were liked, decided to record a couple songs on acid pro, sent them out and a couple production labels replied, one came down to see a concert of theirs at a local club and it went from there.

            If you honestly judge these songs as finished product, it shows the lack of knowledge for what it takes to make an artist and how they begin.

            The fact that they even are getting look at because there white is amazing enough, not to sound racist, but there arent very many white folks in this career.
            Dude I've worked in the music industry for years as a recording engineer, I know what it takes to make an album and I know what a record label does. I don't know if your rant is directed at me but seeing as you quoted me I'll respond.

            I never commented anywhere about the quality of their recordings, obviously most artists that get signed will only have a rough demo at that time. The record label will give them an advance (which will be repaid from album sales) and they'll use that money to make a professional recording. It's real simple, basically any label can do this now because the cost of making a "pro" quality recording has come down substantially over the years (though you still do get what you pay for, more money=better equipment, studios, producers, & engineers).

            The point of my comment was about marketing & distribution, which is where the major labels eat everyone else alive. Like I said, any of these small labels can make a decent album but most of them can't break their artists into the mass market. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule, many indie labels have had successful artists, but that's usually due to the talent of the bands/groups and them building a solid fan base through performing. These days most successful indie labels have been bought up and are just subsidiaries of the majors anyways.

            There's millions of albums out there being made, most of them will never be heard except by a small group of people. The difference between being heard or not comes down to how good of a product it is, how marketable it is, and whether or not the label has the means to put it out where people will take notice. Also getting exposure is one thing, many people are moderately successful through online means these days, but getting your CD manufactured and stocked in record stores and Wal Marts across the country is something that's only going to be achieved with the backing of a powerful label.

            I'm not trying to knock what your friends are doing, in fact I wish them luck, but realistically most bands/groups don't stand a chance of making it huge or even making a successful living as a performer. It's the sad truth.
            Originally posted by njx9
            i invite all of you to spam the board with moronic topics that aren't even vaguely entertaining. please.

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            • #21
              mixtapes is where its at

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              • #22
                Can I get that on A-track?

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                • #23
                  Pretty sure This Guy:


                  Is just a skinnier Ward:


                  And again:


                  Originally posted by snuff
                  Yeah, good joke. Awesome.

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                  • #24
                    I like the blackout on that other guy in the picture lol. id always find it weird to have my pics on display by someone else

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                    • #25
                      He looks more like a baby Dirk Nowitzki.

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                      • #26
                        LOL, I use to allways call him Dirk. They look like clones in a way.

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