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Hunter S Thompson

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  • Hunter S Thompson

    Damn, I miss that guy. I have been reading some of his articles again, and he may be the greatest American author of the 20th century. Hell, he may have been the greatest author in American history. He just had such a unique style of writing, he was just so eclectic.

    I need to go out and buy all his books.

    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2...hompson/030819
    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
    Hunter S. Thompson

  • #2
    What, does no one else like him?
    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
    Hunter S. Thompson

    Comment


    • #3
      he's the ******* man, but we've had like ten circle jerks threads about him

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      • #4
        Im a big fan of alot of hsi writing to be honest. He was one of the fathers of the "new journalism" era, along with guys like truman capote and Thomas Wolfe. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is an excellent novel, though no doubt most know it from the movie.

        Also, being a writer myself, I really enjoy looking at his work. it fits right into my genre, which is the dark, satirical novels (my favourite authors are Chuck Palahniuk and Bret Easton Ellis)
        Originally posted by Mr. Goosemahn
        The APS is strong in this one.
        Originally posted by killxswitch
        Tears for Fears is better than whatever it is you happen to be thinking about right now.

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        • #5
          Hunter S. Thompson.... he rules. His style is amazing.

          Sig by Fenikz

          I remember NFLDC
          don't tell anyone, but Charlie Casserly is a dope fiend

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          • #6
            Originally posted by someone447 View Post
            Damn, I miss that guy. I have been reading some of his articles again, and he may be the greatest American author of the 20th century. Hell, he may have been the greatest author in American history. He just had such a unique style of writing, he was just so eclectic.

            I need to go out and buy all his books.

            http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2...hompson/030819

            Greatest author in American history? Easy fella.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by andyjo672 View Post
              Greatest author in American history? Easy fella.
              I know, I mean that is just ridiculous hyperbole.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by andyjo672 View Post
                Greatest author in American history? Easy fella.
                I absolutely loathe most American authors. I am not sure if any American author has ever captured the spirit of the times like HST did with the 60's and 70's.

                I hate Faulkner, Steinbeck, and Hemmingway makes me want to cry. The few American authors I consider among the all time greats are HST, Mark Twain, Robert Frost, and Edgar Allen Poe.
                I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
                Hunter S. Thompson

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by someone447 View Post
                  I absolutely loathe most American authors. I am not sure if any American author has ever captured the spirit of the times like HST did with the 60's and 70's.

                  I hate Faulkner, Steinbeck, and Hemmingway makes me want to cry. The few American authors I consider among the all time greats are HST, Mark Twain, Robert Frost, and Edgar Allen Poe.
                  In all reality capturing the spirit of the times is easier in the 60's and 70's than the periods the others were writing in...simply consume massive amounts of drugs and start writing. BOOM, essence of the times.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by andyjo672 View Post
                    In all reality capturing the spirit of the times is easier in the 60's and 70's than the periods the others were writing in...simply consume massive amounts of drugs and start writing. BOOM, essence of the times.
                    It wasn't only the drugs. It was the whole culture. After the Kent State Massacre, we were probably the closest we have been to a civil war since the actual civil war. Had that been handled poorly, there would have been a revolution. He captured the mindset of that period, with or without drugs.
                    I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
                    Hunter S. Thompson

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by andyjo672 View Post
                      In all reality capturing the spirit of the times is easier in the 60's and 70's than the periods the others were writing in...simply consume massive amounts of drugs and start writing. BOOM, essence of the times.
                      Thompson's writing is about alot more than drugs.

                      sig by VLS
                      Originally posted by Smokey Joe
                      I don't care...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by someone447 View Post
                        It wasn't only the drugs. It was the whole culture. After the Kent State Massacre, we were probably the closest we have been to a civil war since the actual civil war. Had that been handled poorly, there would have been a revolution. He captured the mindset of that period, with or without drugs.
                        Thats fair, in reality I haven't read a lot of his work, I just tire very fast of that counter culture mumbojumbo that came about during the 60's and 70's. Also, interms of Civil War, we were much closer during the socialist and anarchist upheavals of the 30's.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by andyjo672 View Post
                          Thats fair, in reality I haven't read a lot of his work, I just tire very fast of that counter culture mumbojumbo that came about during the 60's and 70's. Also, interms of Civil War, we were much closer during the socialist and anarchist upheavals of the 30's.
                          I see a lot of parallels in the counter culture to what is going on now. Our involvement in Iraq closely mirrors our involvement in Vietnam.

                          "The 82nd Airborne was in the basement of the executive office building, so I went down just to talk to some of the guys and walk among them, and they're lying on the floor leaning on their packs and their helmets and their cartridge belts and their rifles cocked and you’re thinking, 'This can't be the United States of America. This is not the greatest free democracy in the world. This is a nation at war with itself.'" Charles Colson (Counsel to President Nixon from 1969 to 1973

                          We were as close to civil war in the aftermath of the Kent State shootings as we were in the 30's. Had those shooting been handled poorly, I have no doubt the country would have fallen into a civil war.

                          Amazingly, I have never read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Every time I have tried to get it from the library it has been checked out. I have gotten to the point where I am just going to buy it.
                          I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
                          Hunter S. Thompson

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by someone447 View Post
                            I see a lot of parallels in the counter culture to what is going on now. Our involvement in Iraq closely mirrors our involvement in Vietnam.

                            "The 82nd Airborne was in the basement of the executive office building, so I went down just to talk to some of the guys and walk among them, and they're lying on the floor leaning on their packs and their helmets and their cartridge belts and their rifles cocked and you’re thinking, 'This can't be the United States of America. This is not the greatest free democracy in the world. This is a nation at war with itself.'" Charles Colson (Counsel to President Nixon from 1969 to 1973

                            We were as close to civil war in the aftermath of the Kent State shootings as we were in the 30's. Had those shooting been handled poorly, I have no doubt the country would have fallen into a civil war.

                            Amazingly, I have never read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Every time I have tried to get it from the library it has been checked out. I have gotten to the point where I am just going to buy it.
                            How was Kent State handled well? It is often cited as one of the worst parts of the Vietnam war, and easily the worst on the home front.

                            As to your relation to today, I think that is off base. People that were alive in both periods claim that this i nowhere near the uprising that occurred in the 60's and 70's. They had violent student protests (Kent State), violence in the election process (1968 Chicago Democratic National Convention). The real tipping point in that time period also had a lot to do with the fact that there was a civilian draft, something that would almost be politically impossible in today's America. So comparing the two isn't really an option.

                            Also, a Civil War would necessitate a mass mobilization of uprisings accross the nation including the mobilization of military powers to battle the US government, which was never even close to occurring. Were there mass protests, yes. Was there ever serious talk of secession or uprising against the US government, no.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by andyjo672 View Post
                              How was Kent State handled well? It is often cited as one of the worst parts of the Vietnam war, and easily the worst on the home front.

                              As to your relation to today, I think that is off base. People that were alive in both periods claim that this i nowhere near the uprising that occurred in the 60's and 70's. They had violent student protests (Kent State), violence in the election process (1968 Chicago Democratic National Convention). The real tipping point in that time period also had a lot to do with the fact that there was a civilian draft, something that would almost be politically impossible in today's America. So comparing the two isn't really an option.

                              Also, a Civil War would necessitate a mass mobilization of uprisings accross the nation including the mobilization of military powers to battle the US government, which was never even close to occurring. Were there mass protests, yes. Was there ever serious talk of secession or uprising against the US government, no.
                              The aftermath was handled as well as it possibly could have been. Very shortly after the shootings, the guardsmen were indicted, and the National Guard reexamined their crowd control tactics. The government didn't try to defend the shootings.

                              Remember, we are only a few years into the Iraq War. Large scale Vietnam protests didn't happen for about 5 years after the beginning of our involvement. I don't think it will ever rise to the levels it did at Vietnam, but I can see almost daily the disillusionment with our government growing in people my age. This next presidential election will go a long way to determining if it can escalate to Vietnam like levels. If the GOP wins and there are reports or even rumors of improprieties, we could be in for some exciting times.

                              There does not need to be succession for their to be a civil war. Had one of those military guys got an itchy trigger finger during the riots in DC who knows what mayhem would have erupted. It undoubtedly would have led to mass riots across the country.

                              Our involvement in Iraq is an awful lot like our involvement in Vietnam. The protests haven't reached the same levels, but if we continue to handle it as poorly as we have, they still might. But, both wars were started(or escalated) based on lies. Both wars started out successfully, but got bogged down in guerilla warfare shortly thereafter. Only about 1/3rd of the population has approved of the handling of the war.

                              I think the biggest thing that could prevent an escalation of protests is a wide margin of victory in the upcoming elections. It doesn't matter which candidate it is, only that there is no controversy surrounding this election.
                              I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they've always worked for me.
                              Hunter S. Thompson

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