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Matthew Jones 12-07-2012 09:10 AM

GREs?
 
Hey everyone, I'm going to be applying to graduate schools over the next couple of months and was wondering if anyone had taken the GREs and could give me a recommendation on a good book for studying purposes, etc.?

Also, for schools that do not require GRE scores, should I still submit them? I'm going to be going for my Master's in Education (my Bachelor's is in English Literature) and one of my top schools (University of Connecticut/NEAG) does not require a GRE or comparable score.

I'm generally a good test taker but I'm not sure if it would help or hurt my chances to take the GRE, as I already have a solid GPA (hoping to finish with a 3.87.) Maybe I should just focus on the PRAXIS II (Connecticut teaching exam)?

Another other advice re. personal statements, etc. would be welcome! Thanks!

jrdrylie 12-07-2012 09:42 AM

I took both the GRE and the GMAT. The GMAT was slightly harder, so you're a little luckier you only have to take the GRE. For study preparation, I borrowed my friend's Kaplan book. I got it about 2 weeks before I took the test, did a lot of the exercises, all of the practice tests, and studied the words in the back. You may be able to get a study book from the library (I got my GMAT book there) so you can save some money.

The GRE shouldn't be too bad. The SATs are actually harder. I'm not sure what the required scores are, but a 1200 is easily attainable and a score in the mid-1300s can be had with just a little studying. The worst part is that you take the test on a computer. And if you get the question right, the next one is harder. If you get it wrong, the next one is easier. So it's kind of a mind game. Is it hard because I'm getting a lot right or is it hard because I'm an idiot?

If you get a high score, I would definitely still submit them. It can't hurt. Now if you get a score in the 1000 range, only submit if you have to.

Verloren 12-08-2012 04:51 AM

Math is mostly trig and basic algebra. No calculus. Some pre-calculus in there.

Study the vocab. Get lots of practice at analogies (my nemesis from SSAT and SAT study).

Prep books will give you tips on the exam, and it basically comes down to this for computer systems. If you get a question right, you get a harder question, and a higher score. If you get it wrong, the question gets easier, and your score drops. So basically, don't screw up the early questions. Screwing them up means throwing the chances of getting a high score out the window.

You'd be better off taking the GRE vs not taking it. If you get a good score, it will help you get into schools. If not, don't submit the score if you don't want to. Since there are schools you are applying to which don't require the GRE, it's not the be all and end, unlike the MCAT/LSAT.

Caddy 12-08-2012 05:01 AM

Weren't go asking like a month ago about being a paralegal? MAKE UP YOUR MIND, SON.

cmarq83 12-08-2012 11:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthew Jones (Post 3203722)
Hey everyone, I'm going to be applying to graduate schools over the next couple of months and was wondering if anyone had taken the GREs and could give me a recommendation on a good book for studying purposes, etc.?

Also, for schools that do not require GRE scores, should I still submit them? I'm going to be going for my Master's in Education (my Bachelor's is in English Literature) and one of my top schools (University of Connecticut/NEAG) does not require a GRE or comparable score.

I'm generally a good test taker but I'm not sure if it would help or hurt my chances to take the GRE, as I already have a solid GPA (hoping to finish with a 3.87.) Maybe I should just focus on the PRAXIS II (Connecticut teaching exam)?

Another other advice re. personal statements, etc. would be welcome! Thanks!

MJ are you an undergrad at UConn now?

Nalej 12-08-2012 11:12 AM

I'm thinking about taking them as well soon. That and the FE exam. Ugh, I hate exams.

Brent 12-08-2012 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caddy (Post 3204737)
Weren't go asking like a month ago about being a paralegal? MAKE UP YOUR MIND, SON.

he doesn't have the option of becoming a kangaroo boxer.

bigbluedefense 12-08-2012 01:26 PM

I took the General GRE. It's a joke. I literally studied 5 minutes for it. It's basic algebra and geometry and your standard verbal/writing section.

Check what the requirements are for the schools you want to go to. Many of them don't even require a GRE score. Especially if you're doing grad work at the same school you did your undergrad in.

bigbluedefense 12-08-2012 01:27 PM

The easiest way to get into a program is go non matriculating. Take 1 or 2 courses as a non matriculated student while you do your official application. Get As in them, then they can't deny you into the program unless they're dicks. You already proved you can handle their program by getting As in the classes.

Forenci 12-08-2012 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthew Jones (Post 3203722)
Hey everyone, I'm going to be applying to graduate schools over the next couple of months and was wondering if anyone had taken the GREs and could give me a recommendation on a good book for studying purposes, etc.?

Also, for schools that do not require GRE scores, should I still submit them? I'm going to be going for my Master's in Education (my Bachelor's is in English Literature) and one of my top schools (University of Connecticut/NEAG) does not require a GRE or comparable score.

I'm generally a good test taker but I'm not sure if it would help or hurt my chances to take the GRE, as I already have a solid GPA (hoping to finish with a 3.87.) Maybe I should just focus on the PRAXIS II (Connecticut teaching exam)?

Another other advice re. personal statements, etc. would be welcome! Thanks!

I would definitely focus on the PRAXIS II. GRE is important but the PRAXIS is basically what certifies you to become a teacher (along with other qualifications, depending on the state). I would advise re-reading (as I have been myself) or brushing up on some of the books/literature and common English Lit definitions (post-modernism, post-structuralism, etc.).

mqtirishfan 12-08-2012 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caddy (Post 3204737)
Weren't go asking like a month ago about being a paralegal? MAKE UP YOUR MIND, SON.

He'd be better off going to Grad school than fighting off the hordes of unemployed law school grads for paralegal jobs.

Also, unless their GRE prep is way better than their LSAT prep, ignore the **** out of Kaplan.

jayceheathman 12-08-2012 09:43 PM

The Kaplan books work fine. It is all algebra/geometry, vocab, and a small writing section. My nemesis was the time limit. I like to work on and finish the question while it is on my mind rather than skip it and that has been a problem for me.


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